American Jezebel: The Uncommon Life of Anne Hutchinson, the Woman Who Defied the Puritans

American Jezebel: The Uncommon Life of Anne Hutchinson, the Woman Who Defied the Puritans

by Eve LaPlante

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American Jezebel: The Uncommon Life of Anne Hutchinson, the Woman Who Defied the Puritans 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The author and I are apparently very distant cousins, as Anne Hutchinson was my eleven-times great grandmother. While I knew some of her story, the very readable, incredibly well researched account given by Eve Laplante was a huge treat. The author went to great lengths to portray Hutchinson within the context of her life and times, and without the modern spin of revisionist history. American Jezebel has the breadth of historical accuracy to make it a welcome addition to classroom instruction, as well as the easy readability that would appeal to everyone.
Guest More than 1 year ago
AMERICAN JEZEBEL is a compelling and fast-paced work that offers a vivid close-up on life in colonial America. Eve LaPlante has masterfully created a detailed sense of place and manners in early New England, allowing us to fully engage in the Puritan world of the confident, literate, ever-pregnant and heroic Anne Hutchinson. I have to ask¿ whose idea was it all these years to hide from the grammar and high school American history student the story of Anne Hutchinson? Her biography of conscience and faith is important and should be celebrated in our schools. The image of Anne, articulate and self-assured, standing up to the array of 40 male judges should be as ingrained as the image of honest Abe Lincoln walking back several miles to a store when he noticed he¿d been given one penny too much in change. Read this book. Tell others to read it. And let¿s get Anne Hutchinson into the school curriculum in the US. LaPlante has done a great service here, so effectively shedding light on Hutchinson¿s struggle for women¿s rights and freedom of expression, as well as her outspoken defense of the natives¿ rights. AMERICAN JEZEBEL of the 1600s has the ring of a modern feminist story, as the issues Hutchinson faced are not so different from issues we face today. Anne Hutchinson¿s vision, courage and accomplishments are astonishing. I¿ve been thoroughly captured by this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anne's story is compelling, but this book is very hard to sift through to find it. The author gives tons of information, but it seems that she rambles off in every direction and you lose sight of the plot. There is a lot of background information that is interesting, but takes away from the story of Anne. It was a good book for the school project we used it for, but really a hard and dry read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A great portrait of the colonial rebel Anne Hutchinson that resonates with issues faced by women today, starting with how to balance home life and work. AMERICAN JEZEBEL also gives us a vivid depiction of 17th century Puritan life in Elizabethan England and Massachusetts. The book opens with Hutchinson's trial for heresy, which is beautifully described and explained, as a result of which she was banished from Boston and went on to found the colony of Rhode Island! This book shows how extraordinary Anne Hutchinson was and that, as the first PERSON in America to espouse religious freedom and individual rights, she should be considered our founding mother. What a character! She raised 15 kids, was a midwife, AND could debate theology with the founders of Harvard College and make them look foolish (while pregnant for the 16th time)! The maps of 17th century Boston, Portsmouth, Rhode Island, the Bronx, and Lincolnshire, England alone, along with Laplante's excellent guide to touring these sites of Hutchinson's life, are worth the price of the book.
Louida More than 1 year ago
Anne Hutchinson was the first 'feminist' in the US. She challenged the men of the church (but never the church) and paid highly for her willingness to stand up for what she believed. A fascinating look at the role of men, women, and the church in the early American colonies.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Anne Hutchinson story is told here in well-researched historical context and with clear delineation of the person she was. This book added greatly to my interest in and admiration for a woman who challenged orthodoxy at its most vulnerable points.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This very engaging and fluidly written account of Anne Hutchinson's life and struggle is a must read for anyone intersted in American History or Women's History.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Like the author, Eve LaPlante, I too am a descendant of Anne Hutchinson. While I knew the basic story of Anne's banishment, this book helped me to better understand the attitudes and beliefs of the time. As a genealogist I can find and record the dry facts of born, marriage, and death. But it is difficult to add flesh to those dried bones and make your ancestor come to life. This book made Anne Hutchinson more than just those dry facts and dates, she became a living, breathing person.
lorriedee More than 1 year ago
This book gives an excellent view of the religious outlook in the beginning of the American country we now call the USA. Perhaps because this 'Jezebel' is in our family tree I found the story fascinating. Massachusetts Bay Colony was not as 'free' as we picture it. It also sets the stage for the beginning of women's rights. Excellent for learning about the early Puritan religious beliefs and for seeing how hard life was even for those considered 'well-to-do'. It also covers the Indian-Pilgrim relationships. You develop an understanding of the Indian viewpoint of these foreigners and how much these new people changed the way of life for the Indians. There is a great history lesson about the early United States and Canada.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
4.5 stars. This was an engaging story about the Puritans and their role in early America, as well as the societal role, or lack thereof, allowed to women at the time. From a 21st century perspective, it all seems crazy and unhinged. The author did a wonderful job of bringing this time to life. A must read for history buffs.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anne Hutchinson lived her life caring family, h aving 18 children, sharing her faith and as a result she was defending herself in court run by men who made the outcome suit their needs of authority in male dominant society. What a wise faithful woman she lived her life and is remembered
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book does a great job in pointing out the decline of morality in Western civilization. It gives an inside glimpse of the unfettered depravity of Liberal powers and the Communist/Zionist agenda. A MUST-READ for anybody who wants to understand the degeneracy of society under the Liberal/Zionist NWO control structure.
rainpebble on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Read for R/L B/C. Although I did learn something it was full of boring repetitiveness throughout. I doubt that I even want to sit through the B/C meeting. Might go just for the coffee. ;-)American Jezebel; interesting topic but written quite redundantly about Anne Hutchinson, New England's foremother and Harvard's midwife. I don't know about others, but I was very bored by 1/3 of the way through the book. Puritan New England, not told in the best manner. A 1 1/2 star read for me and I really can't recommend it.
cmbohn on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Themes: gender roles, religion, separation of church and state, individual freedom versus communitySetting: Massachusetts 1638 or soAnne Hutchinson was a terrible threat to the Puritan fathers of Boston. She discussed scriptures. And she was a woman. That's really about it. She also didn't agree with them, but I think even if she had, the idea that a woman was perfectly capable of reading, writing, reasoning, and preaching was going to make them very uncomfortable, no matter what else she did.This is a biography of Hutchinson and a story of the time and place she lived in. It includes a bit about the religious controversies involved and talks a lot about the other players in the case. She was eventually brought to trial, more than once, and charged with ¿traducing the ministers.¿ John Winthrop, governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, conducted the trial himself and made it his mission to get her punished for her behavior. He won, eventually, and Hutchinson and her family were forced to move to Rhode Island and then to Long Island where Hutchinson died.Hutchinson is an interesting subject, but something about this book just couldn't hold my interest. At one point I skipped ahead 100 pages and I really hadn't missed anything. I didn't enjoy this book very much. But I won't anti-recommend this book, if you know what I mean, because I think for the right reader, this would be a good book. Just not for me. 2 stars
NewsieQ on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Interesting book discussion in my readers' group. The line-by-line transcript of her trial got a bit dull at times.
karenmerguerian on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Anne Hutchinson was alternately respected and feared by the people and clergy of the 17th-century Puritan Massachusetts Bay Colony. In this book, author (and Hutchinson descendent) Eve Laplante convincingly demonstrates that Hutchinson's intelligence and defiance of the clergy was brave and admirable. Though it led to her exile it never led to her marginalization. Laplante is less successful in demonstrating that Hutchinson's persecution had to do specifically with her gender. Hutchinson in fact was exonerated for teaching women in her home, which she successfully argued was allowed by scripture. However, she doomed herself to exile by announcing that she received direct revelation from God, and that the clergy were wrongly preaching a covenant of works. In this she was like Roger Williams, and though he was a man, their punishment --exile-- was the same. John Cotton is portrayed here as a slippery betrayer of Hutchinson, his one-time prodigy, and Winthrop as a vengeful pragmatist. The author discusses Hutchinson's continuing legacy (always a problematic issue when it comes to the Puritans), and closes by reviewing her own exploration of sites around New England and New York that are connected to Hutchinson's life.
arelenriel on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Colonial New England history has always fascinated me. I grew up in Massachusetts where so much of Anne Hutchinson's story occurred. This is a wonderful book. It is well researched a presents a balanced picture of how women were perceived and treated in 17th century American.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the story of a great mind that helped shape some of the ideals that have become what we think of as 'America' and 'American'. It transcends gender even though Anne Hutchinson is a woman - her gender is central, but not exclusive, to the struggles. Ms. LaPlante is a wonderful storyteller and she puts forth a history that most Americans are probably not familiar with. I finished the book believing I have always been a Hutchinsonian . . . .