Astrophysics for People in a Hurry

Astrophysics for People in a Hurry

by Neil deGrasse Tyson

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Astrophysics for People in a Hurry 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 49 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
So simple, so clear. Science and Space in a Nutshell. Just open it and fall in love.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Enjoyable quick read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good easy read. Written for the non scientist. Good update from high school and college physics. Nicely put the universe back in perspective.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Makes you think of things you never thought of and challenges you to rethink what you thought. His "Cosmic Perspective" chapter is indeed an eye opener and a wake - up call for some. Well done Neil.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It starts slow but it's a grabber .
PrimmLife More than 1 year ago
The difference between a good artist and a great one is never a question of competency. No, the great artist reveals the beauty of the subject in a way that creates awe in us whereas the good simply represents. The great reawakens that childish sense of amazement. If this is true, then Neil deGrasse Tyson is a great artist. His gift is to be able to present the large, complex mechanisms of the universe in exciting and accessible ways. From his books to podcasts to the show Cosmos to twitter, Dr. Tyson is raising public interest in science. Astrophysics for People in a Hurry, Dr. Tyson's newest book, presents 12 essays to give anyone a survey of modern astrophysics. While each essay is built on a technical framework, the content requires nothing of the reader but a curiosity for the world as it is. This is non-fiction filled with imagination. In this book, Dr. Tyson reveals the beauty of our universe that is often buried in the technical, mechanical papers of academia. Astrophysics for People in a Hurry renews that sense of awe we get from looking up at the night sky. TL;DR: This is a great introduction to the universe in accessible, sensible writing. Highly recommended. Astrophysics for People in a Hurry is twelve essays adapted from Dr. Tyson's "Universe" series in Natural History magazine. Since I didn't read that series, I can't say whether they are strict reprints or modified for this collection. It doesn't matter; these essays are an excellent overview of the astrophysics field. From the size of the universe to the Big Bang to dark matter and dark energy, this collection tackles big concepts in an accessible prose. My favorite essay was the final one, Reflections on the Cosmic Perspective. It's an argument for a more enlightened view. Dr. Tyson uses the perspective of an alien searching for life in the universe and what we may look like to them. With this essay, he's appealing to humanity to take the long view. It's a hopeful piece that urges us to put aside our differences to look into eternity; Dr. Tyson wants us to care for and about our world. "We do not live in this universe. The universe lives within us." This line from the essay typifies the wonder in which Dr. Tyson views his surroundings. The dark energy essay is dedicated to the redemption of the Einstein's cosmological constant. It mixes history with cutting edge science. Dr. Tyson also terrifies me here; he makes the claim that in the future the speed at which galaxies move away from us will be greater than the speed of light. This means that in the future, the sky might only contains stars from our own galaxy. It's almost too big to comprehend. Without a record of these times, future generations may never know there are other galaxies. I thought the weakest piece was The Cosmos on the Table. Conceptually, it is an excellent idea; the essay is a tour through the periodic table based on how the element is viewed/used in astrophysics. But somehow it doesn't work. Potentially this could be my bias against chemistry – definitely not my favorite subject. It just didn't rise to the eloquence and awe of, say, the Dark Energy chapter. This chapter seemed more utilitarian than the others. My only complaint is that this collection is too short. I'd love for a few more essays in here. Dr. Tyson, one of the few pop culture physicists, makes a strong argument for the beauty of the natural world. Read more reviews at https://primmlife.wordpress.com/
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Mr. Tyson has made me love science!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great overview of astrophysics. At times requires rereading make sure you understood, but this is astrophysics. Not too heavy at any point and written as if you are conversing on the subject.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Being anything but a scientist of any kind this book opened my mind up to the wonders of the cosmos in a relatable entertaining way. Anyone who has ever looked to the sky and wondered what it’s all about should read this book and begin their journey to understanding our place in the universe.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great explanations and antidotes. Makes the science so interesting and understandable. The author is an exceptional teacher.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Quick, easy read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Seeing the big picture, defocuses the small and insignificantly pointless that we occupy ourselves with endlessly. Our "humanity" is so petty. Humbling of ego can be the springboard to greatness. Thank-you Neil for the ego perspective....... . bwj...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Dr. Tyson fashions mind-boggling concepts into a language permitting mind-blowing realizations.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed it! A quick and easy read about interesting topics.
avontell More than 1 year ago
Excellent journey through space and time, highly recommended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A great look into science and space. Awesome book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
excellent+The+book+is+not+too+technical%2C+easily+comprehensible+and++short.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You+are+only+stardust%21
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Dr. Tyson examines the universe in a remarkably organized way. What you already know from various scientific sources this treatise reaffirms, and what you didn't know or didn't fully grasp this makes so much more attainable. He makes the important point is that we are both overwhelmingly insignificant to the universe we inhabit and yet that makes us not one zillionth less important to ourselves. I suspect that a reader looking for proof that one or another of the anthropomorphic gods that are the foundation of any of the world's religions will be disappointed. If you read the bible of most any western religion and also have an open mind to science, have no fear to read this. If you take the bible of a western religion literally and have a closed mind to science, you might find this book unsettling. Regardless, it is a worthwhile read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A must read for any and everyone over the age of 18.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Mind blown
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It's exactly as the title implies. A fresh perspective on some otherwise common information, but portrayed in such an elegant and interesting way that it's a must read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Astronomical
plappen More than 1 year ago
What is the nature of time and space? What is our place in the universe? Those are the sort of questions that this book attempts to answer. Scientists don't know just what dark matter or dark energy is all about. It could be some new particle or new phenomenon, as yet undiscovered. Whatever it is, it accounts for the vast majority of the weight of the known universe. Scientists have been able to recreate conditions the tiniest fraction of a second after the Big Bang. They just can't get back to the actual moment of, or just before, the Big Bang. Several thousand exoplanets have been discovered orbiting other stars. At interstellar distances, it is usually not possible to see the actual planet. Therefore, scientists have to focus their attention on a specific star, and look for a slight dimming of its brightness as a planet passes in front of it. It would be wrong to think that the space between galaxies, like the Milky Way, is just empty space. All sorts of things have been found, like runaway stars, gas clouds, x-ray emitting gas clouds, high-energy charged particles, dark matter and dwarf galaxies. Visible light occupies only a small part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Mankind has started to look at the stars using detectors that focus on everything from ultraviolet rays to infrared to radio waves. This is a gem of a book. It is very easy to read and understand, even for non-scientists. This book was made to be read on the commuter bus, or while waiting at the doctor's office. It is very much worth the reader's time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Everything (and more) that a novice like me needs to know.