Audition: A Memoir

Audition: A Memoir

by Barbara Walters

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Audition: A Memoir 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 127 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
B&N, are you kidding?! The nook book is barely a dollar less than the cost of the paperback?! What happened to Nook editions being so much more afordable than buying the book?
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was quite taken with how she was brought up. That part of the book was wonderful. But then it seemed to take a turn with name dropping and patting herself on the back. I also got the feeling that writing this book was some how a way to forgive herself for some of the details in her life. Anyway, I got tired of rolling my eyes with all the wonderful things she has done for the media and this country, so I finished and put it on the back shelf.
Guest More than 1 year ago
At nine o'clock this morning, I arrived at Barnes and Noble, picked up Audition and sat down to read with a cup of coffee. I read for hours, bought the book and continued reading at home. At over 600 pages, this book cannot be read in a day. However, I have read enough to report that the book is magnificent extremely well- written, very pleasurable to read and absolutely fascinating. Open this book and on the inside jacket is a listing of the hundreds (thousands?) of people who Barbara Walters has interviewed and knows. It's pretty staggering, actually. Born September 25, 1929, Barbara Walters has led an extraordinary life. Walters was first known as a TV morning news anchor and became the first female evening news anchor and many of us know her as the interviewer who can make anyone cry. Walters has spent decades reporting the news and extracting juicy details and world events out of world leaders, celebrities, heads of state and other VIP's. In Audition, we get to learn about Walter's personal and professional life and her relationships with many of the most famous people in the world. In the introduction, Walters states: 'It feels to me that my life has been one long audition--and attempt to make a difference and to be accepted.' I was quite moved by her introduction and her feelings about her mentally challenged older sister, Jackie. Walters credits her sister as being the strongest influence in her life and credits her for teaching Walters about compassion and understanding--the traits that have made her such an outstanding interviewer. 'I've guarded my sister's privacy for years.' Walters writes. 'And although she was the central force in my life, she was part of the package that I'm about to unwrap on these pages.' Walter's warmth and compassion comes through in this book and you come to care very deeply about her. This book is an inspiration for everyone, but especially for women. Walters even writes that the book is about giving others hope. I see hope and inspiration in these books especially for young women and girls, because it shows that a woman can be highly intelligent, tough and successful and still be a woman. Walters is a role model and this book a gift to the world. From the author of the award winning book, Harmonious Environment: Beautify, Detoxify and Energize Your Life, Your Home and Your Planet.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a page turner. Barbara led a very interesting life from childhood to where she is now.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Barbara Walters does herself no favors with this book. It is poorly written with no chronological order what-so-ever. It is very difficult to tell whether she is writing about something that happend last year or back in the 70's. She jumps all over the place in her stories. She exposes herself as selfish, arrogant, obsessed with her career and willing to sacrifice whoever to get to the top. She constantly says she feels guilt over her decisions as well she should. I hope she can look back at her career and think it was worth the people she stepped on to get there: her daughter, her parents, her mentally challenged sister, not to mention the countless men - some of whom were married. Quite frankly, I lost any respect I had for Barbara Walters and the majority of this book thoroughly disgusted me.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book kept me up until daylight! I do have to question the amount of times Ms. Walters says she felt guilty about something--but had it in her power to do things differently (ie her sister, her daughter) Also, I know that she needs to be impartial due to her status as a Journalist but she sure went out of her way to befriend some truly disturbed and heinous people. Eating grilled cheese with Fidel Castro-really not necessary for the story and so offensive to Cuban Americans. Other strange 'friendships' include one of the Melendez brothers, Chavez, and Roy Cohn. However, the book was chock full of interesting facts and stories about tons of fascinating people. It seems like Barbara stepped on a lot of toes to get where she is today. But she is larger than life and I was extremely interested throught this book. Well worth reading.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have watched Barbra Walters all my years, and become to love her, she was very gifted in interviewing. She has seen, lived, and done more then any woman, 'other than Oprah', I've known. I admire her more now than ever, I love how gentle she was in explaining on Oprah, how she let the person know she was writing about the affair, which he said he approved of. As for Star, Barbra was 100% correct on her answer as to why they kept her gastric surgery quiet. I was a viewer who knew right up front, Star was lying about diet and exercise, she must have thought the real world was ignorant. I did quit watching the view, as I cannot stand a liar or a thief. When Barbra explained her side and how Star treated them with the People magazine article, 'which I read too at the time', I never believed a word that Star said, this ruined her character for me. But now I feel sympathy for Star since Barbra was compassionate and human enough to explain the situation. Barbra is 100% honest and believable and through the years I've watched her interviewing, she's always been honest whether it was good or bad. And I love her even more today because of what she told Oprah, no matter what, you will always be more respected if you tell the truth, especially being in the public eye. I understand why she wrote about her affair, her sister, and her daughter, she wanted the public to know that even though she was this major icon in our world, she was very much human and suffered pain with the rest of us. She is a woman of integrity in my eyes, and this book will stay on my shelf as a part of my historical collection, and she, along with Oprah, has given women hope. Barbra is truly a role model and a woman of great character. I highly recommend this book for everyone, man or woman to read. FANTASTIC!!
mahallett on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
i was never a big fan. but i didn't realize how hard it was to be a woman tv journalist and how many firsts she had. i enjoyed her sense of humour, often at herself. she is very careful who she speaks badly of, no one in her personal life gets any flack but maybe that's best. she was always very busy and famous and i'm sure that wasn't easy for her daughter. but they seem to get on very well together and she seems proud of her. all in all much, much better than i expected.
readyreader on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I thoroughly enjoyed this memoir. I have a great respect for this woman who overcame the "good old boy" network in the broadcasting industry. I wouldn't have made some of the choices she made in her life, but I do admire her. I especially enjoyed the last part of the book when she talked about her various interviews and her perspective of the world and what was happening at some very momentous times in our recent history. She is a very classy lady!
GaryMiller on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Just finished her memoirs. She does a show once a year called "Ten Most Fascinating People". She deserves to be one of those people. Very fascinating book. No long review this time. Except for a couple of observations. She admits in her book about a long time and very secretive love affair with former Sen. Edward Brooke, while he was still married. She talks about it and analyzes it from what would happen to their careers if it ever came out. There was no analyzes about whether this was right or wrong. Certainly I am no one to judge. But then later in the book, she speaks of other people who were engaging in the same kind of activity and she thought it horrible. That was sorta weird. She does explain her side of the story about the various controversies surrounding the View. She talks about the many interviews she has done over the years, including the ones she enjoyed the most and hated the most. She and her parents were Jewish, but not practicing Jews. She talks about her father, who was in the entertainment industry, and a sister who was developmentally disabled. She spoke about how her parents and sister made an impact on her life. She talks about her three miscarriages and three unsuccessful marriages. She did adopt a child, who cause her much grief in her teen years, but later became a valuable member of society.
librarygeek33 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The fact that I read 624 pages of a memoir gets this book 3 automatic stars. The fourth star was earned by her extraordinary life and the quality of the writing (why was I surprised by this, duh...she's a "journalist" - and a really good one - after all). I've heard people (all right, my mother) complain that she shouldn't have "named names" (Ed Brooke). Actually reading the book reveals her "warts and all" portrayal of herself, which I feel gives her license to tell it like it was. It can't be easy to truthfully open up your life to the world. The sense of honesty that runs throughout is the factor that rates the extra 1/2 star and gives me a new appreciation for the "icon" that I thought I knew.
SigmundFraud on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
over written but an interesting read. I never cared for Barbara Walters but this made me feel more sympathetic. I do think she may have erred in her priorities. It seems like it was career first and Jackie, her child second. Those are choices one makes but it seems like she now has regrets.
brianinbuffalo on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Listening to Walters narrate her autobiography was a great value-added to this audio book. The abridged version omitted some celebrated subplots (i.e. the affair with the congressman). But the book provides some excellent behind-the-scenes peeks at shows like NBC's "Today," ABC's "20/20" and "The View." Walters' globe-trotting reflections in the middle of the book become yawners in a shot time. But she gets back on track relatively fast. For folks interested in journalism and broadcasting, this is a must-read from a television icon.
sroot on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book. Barbara shares the ups and downs of her life in a personal, friend-to-friend manner. She tells the high spots of her life and interviews, but doesn't shy away from the difficult times and her struggles. I have even more respect for her as a person and a journalist after reading this.
bookweaver on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
It started off well, but I got bored with chapter after chapter of all the interviews...there really was no story after Walters joined "20/20"...no stories about herself, that is. I would read the first half or so then just skip to the interviews that interest you.
breezygrl44 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I had no idea that Barbara Walters had such a tough childhood. She always seems so together but this book made me see her in a whole different light, no different than you or me. She really is damn good at what she does for a living. Guess that childhood prepared her for the tough world of TV.
NemesisClaws on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
B. Walters is very brutally honest when it comes to her family, but at the same time, she's also a bit evasive on other things. Just about every man in her life was "kind, gentle, etc"...blah, blah, blah. One rather gets the impression that there was nary a fight in her personal life, which we know isn't reality. Her mother, father, and sister is what perhaps bothers me the most in this book. It's like they basically gave up on living life, even when they were rich. Sure was a lot of denial and avoidance in that family. Overall, I'm impressed though that she's very delicate when she could've rip a few folks into two. Very much a graceful and dignified lady. Clearly shows that her rise to top was a bit accidential at first, but slowly built up steam along the way.
JustMyTwoCents More than 1 year ago
A Fascinating Memoir--Warts and All Look at the Life of a Very Accomplished Reporter I was too young to remember Barbara Walter on the Today Show and I've never seen The View as it is on during the day when I am working. I remember Barbara Walters, therefore, from a number of her interview specials. What a fascinating life she has led. The reader also gets to see how difficult it can be to "have it all."  While her career soared, it did have quite an impact on her personal relationships--her marriages, and her relationship with her daughter. Barbara Walters did not hold back and you got to see a many-faceted woman--competitive, sometimes selfish, often guilt-ridden, confident and insecure often at the same time. Her comments were also thought-provoking at times. For example, her explanation and sometimes conflicted feelings toward Roy Cohn--a man she would be forever grateful to because of the help he offered her father, but who she also felt negatively toward for his treatment of others. It made me think about how we expect famous people to take a stand on everything and treat relationships in an all-or-nothing way, when few people do that in their own lives. This was a long book, but hard to put down.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It is written like Ms Walters speaks. You can almost hear her talking. Good sense of humor.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book is as interesting as the woman herself!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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dwyerGL More than 1 year ago
Detailed and interesting insight into the life of Ms. Walters. Some surprising facts. It can be a bit tedious at times
Anonymous More than 1 year ago