Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality

Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality

by Joan Frances Casey, Lynn Wilson

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Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Best book I’ve read in a long time. Joan’s story and bravery and Lynn’s compassion touched me in a way I hadn’t expected. Can’t recommend it highly enough.
lauriebrown54 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Author Casey (a pseudonym to protect her privacy) is/was a person with Multiple Personality Disorder, a disassociative disorder. Many people are familiar with the disorder from `The Three Faces of Eve¿ or `Sybil¿. This book is unique in that it tells the story of her treatment and integration from the POV of one of the personalities. Joan Frances Casey was abused terribly when she was a child, both sexually by her father and physically and emotionally by her mother. Her personalities emerged to allow her to deal with these assaults. Very intelligent and a high achiever, she entered college early and got her bachelor¿s degree very quickly. But her marriage ended, and, feeling like a failure, her primary personality came to consciousness on a window ledge. She decided she needed to try therapy one more time.Lynn Wilson was a psychiatric social worker for the college who realized something that Casey¿s previous therapists hadn¿t: Casey was a multiple. Knowing that the personalities had emerged because Casey had never felt safe in her childhood, she started on a path of re-parenting Casey, allowing the various personalities to feel safe and to know it was all right to feel and express the emotions they embodied. Wilson did not have any training in this; she did it all intuitively. And it worked- Casey integrated over about 4 years, much more quickly than most MPDs do. Most therapists think she went over the top with the case, bringing Casey into her own family and `adopting¿ her as a fifth daughter, but it worked. For both of them, and for Wilson¿s husband, who became a co-therapist. It¿s a very interesting read. We not only see things from the main personalities POV, but Wilson¿s diaries are interspersed with the main narration, allowing us to see both sides of the therapeutic process. It¿s a much more personal book that `Sybil¿ or `Eve¿ or the other books on MPD. Recommended.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
The flock Casey refers to is the flock of personalities that resides within her. Likened to the cooperation a flock of birds experience to fulfill a collective goal. Casey leads us through her flight from walking a tightrope in the daily struggles of life to the flight of integration she migrated into. With the help of not only a very devoted therapist who practiced reparenting to an extreme by having Casey live with her for brief peroids of time, Casey is accompanied by the therapist's dedicated husband also. Casey is able to reach her integration goal in record time and simutaniously masters her graduate studies at Harvard. Very distinct and well written conversations are captured between her personalities to express the internal dialogues that continually take place in this honest and clear tale. Therapists notes are scattered throughout the book to give a professional viewpoint to a process that was to be the first of several DID cases she would encounter in her career.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book will "hook" you immediately! This book was absolutely fascinating!!