Left for Dead: My Journey Home from Everest

Left for Dead: My Journey Home from Everest

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Left for Dead: My Journey Home from Everest 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 35 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If I could give less than one star, I would."Left For Dead" is one of the worst books I have ever read. The back of the book tells how it is a story of survival and a reclaiming of a life. The book however does not live up to this promise. Only about 1/4 (at most) is about Beck's part in the Everest tragedy and his recovery from the event. This small portion is basically a rehash of things already described in Krakauer's "Into Thin Air" and Boukreev's "The Climb". There is absolutely nothing new here, as you would think would be since it is written by Beck himself. The remainder of the book contains a seemingly endless debate between Beck and his wife, Peach, about who is the worse spouse. I found it very monotonous and unentertaining to read. Throughout the accusing, criticizing and belitlling I found nothing that resembled the story of survival and the reclaiming of a life that the book said to offer. Stay away from this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'I searched all over the world for that which would fulfill me, and all along it was in my own backyard.' That's how Beck Weathers sums up what his harrowing Everest adventure taught him. If you're looking for suspense, look elsewhere. The facts of the 1996 climbing season on Mount Everest are well known, and Dr. Weathers (a Texas pathologist) tells his own climb's story in his book's first section. This is one man's personal memoir, not a mountaineering book, and I knew that when I bought it. His reasons for wanting to summit Everest were entirely unlike pioneer climber George Mallory's famous, 'Because it is there.' For Dr. Weathers this was one more way to insulate himself from the growing pain of living. What could make such an outwardly successful human being feel that way about his life? Beck Weathers had it all, and not just the material things that a partner in a thriving medical practice can afford for himself and for his family. He also had a loving wife, two healthy and gifted children, a host of friends, and a supportive extended family. Yet this brilliant and charismatic man could not bring himself to believe that these people really did love him, and wanted his company. Nor could he allow himself to enjoy theirs, because in his mind he did not deserve happiness. He deserved, instead, the kind of punishment that extreme sports inflict. The enormous gap between Beck's world as he perceived it through the filter of chronic depression, and Beck's world as it really was, closed when he to all intents and purposes froze to death on Mount Everest. Opening his eyes after hours of lying out in a blizzard, left for dead not once but twice by comrades unable to carry him to safety, was his first miracle. Getting off the mountain alive was his second, after the Base Camp doctors responded to news of his revival by telling those trying to care for him after he stumbled into camp horribly frostbitten: 'He is going to die. Do not bring him down.' The third miracle, though, is the greatest one. Beck Weathers held onto his near-death epiphany. He believed the truths he'd finally glimpsed, and used that knowledge to transform his life. Slow reading at times, as we follow Beck's early life and go with him through young manhood? Maybe. But everything he says in those chapters is necessary to the story, and his flashes of wry and biting humor had this particular reader howling at times. He spares himself nothing, and allows others who know him - wife 'Peach' mostly, but also his children, brothers, and associates - to add their viewpoints even when they honestly disagree with his own. No, this isn't a book about mountaineering. It's about redemption, and how high a price one man paid to find the happiness that should have been his all along. I am very glad I read it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As the critic review states 'this book deals in part with the climb but mainly with Weathers's life before and after the catastrophe'. And even though the excerpt implies the book is about the climb, it is not. The majority is about his life which is the most boring, obnoxious, arrogant, bunch of hogwash I have ever read. Unfortunately, I did not read the reviews. I heard an interview of him by Neal Boortz on a local Atlanta radio station. I bought the book thinking the book would focus on the climb. Instead it is about his cat, his son and daughter, just mindless, totally uninteresting drivel. I could not even finish the book. It was bad enough paying for the book but I was really mad at taking the time away from reading good books to read this ripoff.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Left for Dead is an intense book that plunges it's readers into a epic story of survival and of the strength and perservierence of the human spirit. I lost a whole nights sleep because I couldn't put it down, and then lost another thinking about it! If you enjoy reading about Mt. Everest, climbing, survival, or anything at all, you will love this book! A must buy!
Debbie Saelens More than 1 year ago
Thought+I+was+buying+a+book+about+survival+on+Everest%2C+but+got+an+autobiography.+Disappointed.%0A
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Beck Weathers proves there's a mountain we all need to climb in order to transform our self-serving behaviors to serving others. Beck's journey is written to inspire and entertain. You will be fully absorbed and impressed by his articulate style. I was moved to both tears and laughter.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I felt this book not only summed up what Krakauer began but also swam beneath the surface of Beck Weathers and his extraordinary recovery. I also enjoyed Beck¿s struggle to refurbish his marriage. I offer oodles of praise for Beck Weathers.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Don't read Left for Dead if you expect to get the skinny on what really happened on that tragic day on Everest, this book only focuses 1/10th of its pages on those events, and then only sketchily. But it's a fascinating psychological study of a man, and what makes people want to climb, the climbing fraternity, and a disintegrating marriage. The author's wife and others have their own voices in the book, and it makes a very effective look at all sides involved. A fascinating read, and it's a shame on the lack of Everest information, because Weathers can really write well, and explains himself wonderfully. He needs to write another book focusing only on that 1996 expedition.
amerynth on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I can't get enough of climbing memoirs, but Beck Weathers' book "Left for Dead" is not really that kind of book. It is, in part at least, the story of his remarkable survival in the deadly 1996 season on Mount Everest, where he was left for dead but survived. In his opening chapter, he describes himself as an "amateur climber," in my opinion someone who had not business being on Everest, and his book reads that way. It annoyed me the first time he described his crampons (essentially cleats that you attach to your boots to provide traction on ice) as knives. The fact he continued to call them knives rather than crampons thereafter drove me nuts.I've read several other books on the Everest tragedy (including Krakauer's, Boukreeve's and Breashear's.) I had been avoiding Weathers' book for no particular reason... perhaps it was instinct that I wouldn't like it. Although he had the most dramatic story of all, Weathers' book was the worst of the lot. (Only a small portion of the book is about the expedition itself.) Perhaps my intense dislike for this book is that I expected to be a climber's book and it is more a story about depression. I found it hard to swallow the redemption story and mostly just felt sorry for Weathers' family.
drebbles on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
ivided into four parts, "Left for Dead" is not only about Beck Weathers' near death on Mount Everest, but his life before and after the disastrous expedition. The first part of the book describes the events on Mount Everest; the second part is autobiographical; the third part is about his depression and why he took up mountain claiming; and the fourth part is about his life today. Also discussed are his marriage woes and how his marriage survived his various obsessions (such as motorcycle riding and sailing, as well as mountain climbing). The book isn't written solely from Weather's point of view; there are reflections from other people in his life, most notably his wife, Peach. "Left for Dead" is an interesting read about a flawed human being. Beck Weathers has a good, at times self-deprecating, sense of humor, and is very honest about his flaws. His wife, Peach, is aptly named, but I had to wonder why she stayed married to a man who was absent much of the time and difficult to live with when he was around. There wasn't as much about mountain climbing as I would have liked, but in the end Weathers seemed ill prepared for Everest. Mountain climbing was just an outlet for Weathers' ongoing depression and it's a miracle he wasn't hurt in some of his earlier attempts. While the book goes into much details about Beck's childhood and troubled marriage it glosses over other elements - most noticeably the cost of Beck's climbing expeditions and how Beck was able to take so much time off from work. Finally, I'd like to see an updated postscript on future editions to see how Beck and his family are doing today. This was an enjoyable read.
Katymelrose on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I think Beck's story is intriguing and almost fairy-tale-ish....but not in a bad way. It is because so much of his outlook on life changed based on that one incident, it wasn't a gradual change like life usually is. Because of my expectations, I wasn't sure I was going to be too terribly interested in the parts other than his experience on Everest after reading Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer and The Climb by Anatoli Boukreev, but I was interested. Beck tells his story with a self-deprecating sense of humor that makes the story easier to read than it would be without it. He doesn't glorify any of it and includes things that I would imagine would be very difficult to share with the world. This might finally end my consuming need for more information that Into Thin Air evoked.
bookymouse on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I had been wanting to read this for awhile. Beck Weathers was left for dead twice during the 1996 Everest season. This is the account of his recovery, as well as what led him to the mountain to begin with. I started it this morning and just finished it. This is a brutally honest look inside a very lucky man. I couldn't put it down.
birksland on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
One of the most honest books about the sacrifices of climbing and insight into the kinds of people that do it. As a former mountaineer, I appreciated the non-macho slant of this book.
DarkRavenDH More than 1 year ago
The story of survival against all odds… May 10, 1996 marked one of the worst climbing disasters on Mount Everest. When a sudden storm trapped climbers high on the mountain, eight would perish in the unforgiving weather. One who was left for dead, who would have made it nine persons, recovered after spending over a day in the open. Though he would lose a hand and all the fingers on the other, Weathers had made it home alive. This is his story. Where Weathers could have spent a lot of time lambasting the decision to leave him, he has chosen to concentrate on how the mountain changed him. Weathers reveals that he was clinically depressed most of his life, and that climbing mountains was his way of coping with his problems. The climbs became his sole focus and his marriage was disintegrating around him. Depression can do strange things to people, and like many others, Weathers was unable to see past his solution from the crippling illness. His near death on Everest changed him more than physically. When he awoke on the mountain and staggered into camp, Weathers really woke up to the things that are important in life. I really liked this book. I also deal with depression, and Beck Weathers’ story was a real shot in the arm. When you feel like you can’t go on, there is always someone who has faced worse and survived. Thanks for your book, Beck Weathers. I will not soon forget the lessons you have taught me. I give this book five stars… Quoth the Raven…
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book surprised me in the best of ways - I was initially disappointed when the portion about the events on Everest wrapped up so quickly, but the more I read about Beck and both his back-story and the aftermath of Everest, the more respect I had for him as a person, and the more wrapped into the book I became. The honesty and open-ness with which he looked back on his decisions and how they affected himself and his loved ones was something the average person is probably not capable of. I think he endured hell on Everest, and that part of his story was absolutely captivating, but the part that really grabbed me was how that experience changed him as a person in such significant ways, beyond the physical effects. It was overall inspiring, brutally honest, and a thoroughly engaging read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is a bit related to Into Thin Air but the story is centered around Beck Weathers and his life before and after Everest. My overall view on the book is that it's not the best I've ever read but it's not the worst. A common theme is this book is the battle between balancing a hobby such as mountain climbing with family. Some things I like about this book is it builds a very strong character of Beck and to add to that there are sections of the book where members of friends and family have written in the book to give their opinions about Beck’s decisions.On the other side some of my dislikes are that the timeline of the book jumps around quite a bit. The beginning starts with his near death experience then jumps to the beginning of his life, then back to Everest then continues from there. This is very confusing to me and throws off the story. Into Thin Air has already been made into a movie and i found that to be enjoyable but if this book was turned into the movie it wouldn't really add to the story and usually when books shift into movies the return isn't that good. If you want to see how an Everest disaster effects somebody's life or the kind of effort that is needed to even get to the point where you can climb Everest I would recommend reading this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Best keep you on the edge of your seat and hard to put down
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