Small Great Things

Small Great Things

by Jodi Picoult

Hardcover

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Small Great Things 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 187 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is the story of a nurse accused of willfully not carrying out her duty to save the life of a new born baby. As a black.woman, she was forbidden to.touch the son of a white supremicist. When the baby crashes and codes in.her presence,what is the right thing to do? Obey the orders of her supervisor or don't.touch the.struggling baby. . White privilege as well as rampant racism is examined here, as well as all the ways we try to tell ourselves that WE aren't like that..well written and thoughtful with just enough suspence and rage inciting incidents to keep you interested. I.learned more about the white supremist culture than I ever wanted to know. Seriously, Doc Martens?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this book and was profoundly disturbed. I had never thought about active racism vs passive racism; I only thiught in terms of racism period! In light of our recent election I want to thank you for writing this book and encourage all of you to read it. I have been awakened!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm almost embarrassed to admit how ignorant I was before reading this book. It's honestly a life changer! I would love to have a friend like Ruth and a friend like Kennedy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I absolutely loved it. This book has had me torn between bawling my eyes out and re-thinking how I see the world. Just an absolutely amazing book. My favorite, by far, among her many novels.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is amazing! Loved it! Could not put this beautifully written book down. This is a story to be read by everyone that is part of the human race. It will make you look inside yourself and bring you to tears. Jodi Picoult is one fantastic writer!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a must read Her best book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A gripping, thought provoking read
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Jodie is the best. I've read everone of her books and she just keeps getting better!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Omg. She's nails it yet again. Great vook
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I suspect like many people you are in denial. No one explores the issue more succinctly, honestly, and forth rightly than Jodi Picoult in this book. Powerfully moving and insightful story which forces each one of us to face our stated belief, "I am not a racist." And to move beyond it, confronting the damage white privilege does to the nonwhites. We MUST acknowledge it and learn to be comfortable discussing it. Or it will never change and we will not evolve to our more perfect Self.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved this book! Jodi once again you have left me thinking about you characters, and begging for more.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Intense, at times difficult because it's thought provoking. It's also the best book I've read in a long time. A book like this is overdue , and in a period when there is so much divisiveness the message may inspire reflection and understanding. People of color do live in a different world than the whites around them , with constant reminders they aren't the power group. Even the lessons about daily life taught to children reflect this ; not many whites discuss with their children how to act if stopped by police , nor do they have a valid fear that stop could be lethal. Well written , well proof read , hard to put down , excellent book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Jodi dives into controversial topics and allows all view points and voices to be heard. Really an amazing writer.
RandyTramp More than 1 year ago
Like ripping a bandaid off a wound, this story did just that. Ruth, a widowed African-American nurse is told not to touch a baby. Why? Because of Ruth's skin color. The new-borne has problems and Ruth disregards the order, trying to save the babies life. The baby dies. This story will stay with me for a long time. Emotional, troubling and powerful. I enjoy Jodi's writing style. Each chapter, a different character. "Grace to say yes, the right to say no." "People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite." Nelson Mandela To say I enjoyed this book would be inaccurate. I experienced it and I'm grateful to have changed in the process. America needs to read this book for healing.
cloggiedownunder More than 1 year ago
“What if the puzzle of the world was a shape you didn’t fit into? And the only way to survive was to mutilate yourself, carve away your corners, sand yourself down, modify yourself to fit?” Small Great Things is the 22nd adult novel by American author, Jodi Picoult. Ruth Jeffries is an experienced neonatal nurse, working in the Labour and Delivery suite at Mercy-West Haven Hospital in Connecticut. Having performed her usual checks on baby Davis Bauer, she is shocked to be told she may not have any further contact with him. Turk Bauer is a White Supremacist and determined that no black nurse is going to touch his child. Notwithstanding the directive, some time later Ruth finds herself faced with a dilemma when Davis stops breathing. Despite emergency intervention, Davis dies and Turk is convinced that Ruth is responsible. When Ruth is arrested, it is Public Defender Kennedy McQuarrie who represents her for the arraignment, and helps her seventeen-year-old son organise bail. Seeing the opportunity to gain experience, Kennedy asks to be assigned to Ruth’s case, a case that would normally go to someone more experienced. Picoult uses three narrators: Ruth, Turk and Kennedy give the perspective of the black defendant, the White Supremacist and the privileged white lawyer who believes herself impartial to race. Characters that begin as somewhat stereotypical soon develop a depth that may surprise. Likewise, the plot that seems to be headed to a fairly predictable conclusion develops a few interesting twists. Drama and tension are relieved by the delightfully funny banter between Kennedy and her family. This is a story that is packed with emotion: sorrow and grief, love and hate, guilt and shame, all guarantee some lump-in-the throat moments. Words of wisdom and insightful observations are a feature: “It is amazing how you can look in a mirror your whole life and think you are seeing yourself clearly. And then one day, you peel off a filmy gray layer of hypocrisy, and you realize that you’ve never truly seen yourself at all” Picoult also gives the reader some marvellous descriptive prose: “Turk Bauer makes me think of a power line that’s snapped during a storm, and lies across the road just waiting for something to brush against it so it can shoot sparks” and “We passed a few women in the kitchen, who were bouncing from fridge to cabinets and back like popcorn kernels on a hot griddle, who were exploding one at a time with commands: Get the plates! Don’t forget the ice cream!” are examples. Of course, only a person of colour may judge if Picoult’s portrayal of a black woman is accurate, and, while many will criticise this white author, with her privileged upbringing and education, for having the audacity to present a black person’s perspective, her extensive research, as mentioned in the author’s note, is apparent in every paragraph. Racism is a big topic to tackle, so if an author of Picoult’s talent and reputation can make even a few more people truly aware of it, and cause them to honestly examine their own attitude towards it, then this book is worthy of praise. Moving and thought-provoking, Picoult’s latest offering is another brilliant read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As always, her characters are delightfully real. I was left questioning my views and feelings on race and relationships. This book brought me to a deeper level of understanding and love for the human heart.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was beautifully written and made me really think deeply about myself and my race.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The story's main character is Ruth, an African American working as a nurse on the OB ward at a small, understaffed hospital. One night a White Supremist and his wife go to the hospital to have their baby. Ruth is told to stay away from the child after he is born when she attempts to give the baby a check up. Events spiral downward from there and make for front page headlines. This is a much needed story regarding racism, the differences in how one is treated when they have a darker skin tone. I hope this story will allow for more open dialogue on race.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Story draws the reader in immediately! I couldn’t put it down until I finished reading the book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great Book!!*
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Yet again Jodi Picoult knocks another out of the park....thought provking...eye opening story revolving around racism.. in all aspects...truly makes you stop and think...a must read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Truly one of the best books I've ever read! This is one that everyone should read! So incredibly eye-opening!
Ilovemister More than 1 year ago
This book was a real eye opener. All I can say is, if you don't read this book you are missing perhaps the finest books of 2017!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wonderful mind opening story
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved this book real page turner!