What Jesus Meant

What Jesus Meant

by Garry Wills

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What Jesus Meant 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 20 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I found his book to be quite thought provoking - being raised Catholic and after having some difficulty continuing to believe in the Catholic way, this book really helped me to understand that it doesn't matter what religion you are, all you really need is to understand what Jesus meant and then follow through. This book takes the confusion out of understanding the bible and some of Jesus' teachings and puts things into perspective for us to relate to today. It brings to a crystal clear light what exactly Jesus was here for and what he wants of us. I really enjoyed this book.
guls More than 1 year ago
Mr. Wills presents a number of slants on the life and teachings of Jesus. As a Catholic but one that does not agree with the church's ostentatious style I enjoyed this book. None of the points that Mr. Wills puts forth are radical or can be readily dismissed. It is not a "deep" composition BUT one that is a good and thought provoking book
ChrisO31 More than 1 year ago
This book is for anyone interested in developing their faith and keeping it fresh. Garry has a way of articulating a different perspective in a clear, convincing manner. Even if you don't agree, you have to admit it makes you think. Do not just read the first 50 pages; read the whole (short) book before making a determination; it will change your perception, at least a little.
AshRyan on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Garry Wills is one of those very few Christians (almost invariably Catholic) whom I can sort of respect---honest, knowledgeable, even intellectual, and perfectly willing to challenge fundamental tenets of his religion's dogma and to denounce the current pope and his predecessors. But in the end, it still comes down to blind faith in utterly unsupportable mystical gibberish---and his intelligence just makes it even more inexcusable, as it must require that much more evasion to maintain.
bethlea on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Garry Wills goes to the source - the market place Greek spoken by Jesus and His contemporaries and shows us what Jesus really meant. Not to found a church with any structure; not to create another religion with all its complexity and rules; but to free all people by showing them God's love and promising to be with them for all eternity.
PointedPundit on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Unambiguously, Garry Wills cuts to the heart of the gospel in his book ¿What Jesus Meant.¿As in ¿Lincoln at Gettysburg¿ and ¿Nixon Agonistes¿ (my two favorite Wills books) the author looks at a familiar set of facts and draws startling insights. In this book I was fascinated by Wills¿- a former Greek professor at Johns Hopkins University - ability to draw insightful and nuanced meaning from his personal translations of familiar New Testament verses.Like Jesus, Wills subscribes to no later day political as he explores the meaning of the ¿resign of heaven¿ promised by God¿s son. Like Jesus, he speaks plainly and bluntly about power, wealth and even religion itself.Able to be read in a single sitting, ¿What Jesus Meant¿ is sure to spark a personal internal debate over your understand of Jesus and the Scriptures. Finish it and you will join me in thanking Wills for enhancing your understanding of religion¿s role in our society today.
iammbb on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Wills has an interesting perspective on who and what Jesus was. He believes, as his foreword states, that Christ was not a Christian. ". . . he is not just like us, he has higher rights and powers, he has an authority as arbitrary as God's in the Book of Job. He is a divine mystery walking among men. The only way we can directly imitate him is to act as if we were gods ourselves - yet that is the very thing he forbids. He tells us to act as the last, not the first, as the least, not the greatest. And this accords with the common sense of mankind. Christians cannot really be 'Christlike.' As Chesterton said, 'A great man knows he is not God and the greater he is the better he knows it.' The thing we have to realize is that Christ, whoever and whatever he was, was certainly not a Christian."Wills offers some thought provoking analysis of what the Gospels really have to say about Jesus. His is an anti-establishment view. He claims that religion killed Jesus, that Jesus was opposed to religion as it existed in his day and that he "did not found a church."Don't read this book if you don't want to question your preconceptions.
Osbaldistone on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Sure to make you think twice (or at least think more) about things you've been taking for granted.
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If you are looking for a meditation on scripture, look no further.
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It's nice to read a book that uses current scholarship about Jesus' time and when the books of the New Testament were written but is written by a believer. The author makes sense of parts that might be confusing to a modern reader while acknowledging the Gospels were not written by eyewitnesses to the events.
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