When Pride Still Mattered: A Life Of Vince Lombardi

When Pride Still Mattered: A Life Of Vince Lombardi

by David Maraniss

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When Pride Still Mattered: A Life Of Vince Lombardi 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 46 reviews.
Ravensfan-UBgrad More than 1 year ago
The author is able to balance the legendary iconic status of Lombardi while able to show his human side without tarnishing the image. There was enough about his family and personal life to enable one to connect to why he contributed and impacted society in an era that is lone gone but not forgotten. Great job of writing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I believe VInce Lombardi was the greastest coach in the history of the NFL. The theme for the novel i read is 'if you believe in yourself you have the courage, determination, dedication,competitive drive and if you are willing to sacrifice the little things in life and pay the price for the things that are most important, you can accomplish anything'. THe reason why i chose this theme was because his whole life he had been through so many struggles and the only things that he had were his courage, determination, dedication competitive drive, and the will to sacrifice for the things that were most important. Vincent Thomas Matilda's five children. Vince was raised in a catholic faith and studied priethood for two years before tranferring to St. Francis prepartory High School where he was a star fullback on the football team. Vince was accepted at New York City Fordham University in 1933. After a year one the freshman team, varsity football coach Jim Crowley made Vince a gaurd on Fordham's strong offensive line, which was called the seven blocks of granite. he was successful off the field as well, graduating with a buisness major in 1937. For the next two years Vince worked at a finance company, took night classes at Fordham's law scholl and played semi pro football with Delaware's Willmington Clippers. In 1939 he took a teaching and coaching job at St. Cecilia High School in Inglewood, News Jersey Vince taught algebra, physics and chemistry and coached their football and basketball teams. He married Marie Plantiz in 1940 qwith whom he had a son Vince Jr. and a daughter Susan. Vince left St. Cecilia in 1947 to coach at Fordham University. he spent one year coaching Fordham's football team and in the next as an assistant coach for the varsity team. Earl Blaik, football coach for the united states military academy at west point[and considered the best coach in the county at the time, hired Vince to manage their Varsity defensive line in 1949]. Vince regularly woirked seventeen hours a day with Blaik whos expertis helped built up leadership skills, Blaik aught and Vince to stick with simple blocking and tackling players strives for perfect execution and conduct himself respectfully on the field. Vince left Westpoint in 1954 for assistant coaching positions with the New York Giants, under head coach, and former colleague Jim Lee Howell. Vince was in charge of offensive stratagy for the Giants while coach Tom Landry led the defense. Within three years of Vince's arrival, however, the Giants were a championship team. For each of the five years that Vince coached the Giants didn't have a loosing season. By 1958, Vince was tired of being an assistant. He accepted a chalenging five-year contract in Wisconsin as the general manager and head coach of the constant loosers, the Green Bay Packers. At the time, the Packers had won only one game the previous year and Vince saw them as a chance to prove himself and his coaching abilities. Vince held the first of his intense training camps to gear up for the 1959 season. 'Dancing is a contact sport' he told the Packers, 'Football is a hitting sport'. Vincce expected obedience, dedication, and 110% effort from each man, but he also made a promise to them if they obeyed his rules and used his method, they would be a championship team. Three years later, that promise became a reality. At Lambeau Field in Green Bay on December 31, 1961, Vince watched proudly as the Packers defeaated the New York Giants 37-0 for the National Football League Champoinship. Despite long hours and fierc competition, Vince never put forth anything but his best effort. Just as he drilled his men to be the best players in professional football, he challenged himself. Vince constantly looked to make new plays and game stratagies, even changing his players' jersey numbers before a game to confuse the other team. The Packers' offensive line became so powerful, their run name was the 'Green
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was by far, the best sports biography that I have ever read. I couldn't put the book down.
robertmorrow on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Even if you are not a football fan, this is biography at its best. The all-consuming drive of the man makes for a fascinating character study that never leaves you wanting.
Elijah-J-Krause More than 1 year ago
Vince Lombardi. This name alone can invoke intense emotion. A fan of the NFL's Green Bay Packers Football team might go on and on about how he was simply the greatest coach of all time. They could also rant about how Lombardi's in a class of his own, separate from Chuck Noll, Don Shula, and even Bill Belichick. Bears fans could vociferate about how Lombardi stole the best years of their life from them. However, chances are neither of them know that he at one point coached the hapless Washington Redskins and that he could have turned them into the same dynasty that he made out of Green Bay. David Maraniss masterfully reveals this and many other hidden jewels of Lombardi’s life to the reader in When Pride Still Mattered. Maraniss’ exceptional attention to detail goes far beyond what should be expected in a biography of a sports figure. This detail involves Lombardi’s troubled relationship with his son, his membership of one of the fiercest offensive lines of all time, and his years coaching for Army College. It also expresses itself by unfolding the beginning of Lombardi’s life as an offensive guard for the Fordham Rams. It also brings his mentor, Colonel Red Blaik, to the forefront of Lombardi’s life. In the same way, Maraniss reveals the alcoholism of Lombardi’s wife, as well as the fledgling desire of Vince Lombardi Jr. to impress his father. Because of this detail, Lombardi appears not to be just a great football coach, but a person with a three-dimensional personality. When Pride Still Mattered by David Maraniss truly is a noteworthy account of an enigmatic sports figure’s rise to the top. While the incredible detail in When Pride Still Mattered can cause the book to become tedious at times, it is well worth it in order to discover the many intricacies of Lombardi’s life.
wenestvedt on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The bigraphy of Vince Lombardi, pro football demigod. My word, what a narrow world view that man had: football uber alles. I sure hope he was happy. I enjoyed reading the book, though I was relieved wheen it ended.
Joe5453 More than 1 year ago
This is a great book that displays the best coach to ever step on the football field. It shows Vince's life starting from him being a little kid all the way up to him being the coach and man he had became. It includes all of Vince's personal life on and off the field. This was one of the best books i have ever read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The most over riding thing about this book is that like the subject - we will never see another time (or person) like it again. Reading this is about what we all wish sports was still like; that is about the sport. This puts the name on the front of the jersey where it should be; FRONT. The idea of reading nostalja never comes to mind. You just find yourself wondering how we got to the point that the name on the back of players uniforms is the only thing that now matters. I don't know that a great deal of really new detail comes to the fore front, but the way it is all interwolven is truely wonderful. Vince the Icon becomes human and in that way, understandable. For sports fans it is a classic read.
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The title is very appropriate for the book. One that even those in senior high should read. All should read it.
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Anna Reed More than 1 year ago
my uncle told me to look this book up and he said it was good and he was so right