A Poet's Moon

A Poet's Moon

by Jacquee Thomas

Paperback

$19.95
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Overview

A Poet s Moon is a historical fantasy that takes place in the 1870s. Elissa Johnson is a daughter of a maid who works in a wealthy household. She yearns to travel, and is led to believe that will never happen -- till her lover, Paul, appears in her room and takes her to many spots throughout Western Europe. Magically, he gets her back home before she s missed. Is she dreaming?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780595244584
Publisher: iUniverse, Incorporated
Publication date: 09/16/2002
Pages: 392
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.87(d)
Age Range: 3 Months

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2.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
From the first sentence I was captured by the story. I was right in the middle of the 19th century and it was easy to imagine the world around Elissa Johnson, her home, environment, and the society in which she was born. Not only the different character fascinated me, the whole setting - which I could easily visualize, hear, smell and even taste - became alive. I was part of the incidents, an attached observer excited to follow the path wherever it would take me. This wonderful book shows it all. Mind, Body and Soul related to Love and described in the poetry of dreams.
Guest More than 1 year ago
One of the themes reflected in this story is how, in a woman's pursuit of success, other women are often among her biggest obstacles. They can be mean-spirited and uncomfortable with female ambitions that aren't their own. Mrs. Charrington works hard to be an obstacle to Elissa's ambitions, and she's an example of what we still see today -- an insecure, mean-spirited woman putting down someone she feels threatened by. Not all women are like that. Elissa isn't. Throughout the story Elissa tries to get around her obstacles, while being true to herself and to those around her. Of course, is she being true when she talks of Paul? Sometimes, even she's not sure. This book is an engaging read, with just enough description to let your imagination take over.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I like the way this is written, with a smooth style that flows from page to page. The storyline makes it hard to put the book down. The characters seem to rise from the pages. I absolutely enjoyed this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
not at all good. you only have to read the synopsis of the book to realize that if that reads as if it's a 6th grade book report, the whole book reads that way. I wish I had let that warn me. Poor, out-of-time dialog, attitudes not compliant with the social mores of the time in which it is set, and poor sentance structure. it could have done with heavy editing. the idea has merit, maybe reworked it would be fine.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a teacher at a middle school, I am always looking for titles to add to my classroom 'library' and suggestions for the school's library. Unfortunately this title will appear in neither. The story's plot is not very original and is not even interestingly presented. The characters are tired caricatures. The language seems forced and not at all poetic. The dialogue is silly at times and just plain odd in others. Many of my middle school students are more accomplished writers. Even if this book was picked up by a 'young adult' and believe it would be thrown down almost as quickly.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is simply dreadful. The characters seemed like they were named by a person who really liked 80's dramas such as Dynasty and Falcon Crest.. The language goes in and out of being correct to the time period. The pages are loaded with bad cliches, redundancy, and more adjectives than you can shake a stick at.. The one redeemable quality of the book is the hilarity of reading some of it aloud . The book has gems such as- 'He looked at her, pulled her close for a kiss' I would like to see a fairy first' I could not stop laughing at the poor sentence structures. This is a valiant first attempt by an author who should have perhaps been better 'well read' .
Guest More than 1 year ago
"A Poet's Moon" is presented in such detail and with so clear a window into the mind of Elissa, her journey becomes an escape. We witness her tribulations, feel the blows she takes, welcome her triumphs. Through her eyes we see how the residents of Charrington manor deal with their roles in society. Everyone has a different style, and a different motive. People in "A Poet¿s Moon" struggle with their identities while they try to make it through life -- just as we often do. This story was set long ago, yet it has a way of reflecting on our own lives. It¿s captivating.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read it in three days. At first I picked it up to skim through the pages, but everywhere I stopped I found myself drawn in. Interesting characters continued to appear (Uncle Frederick's my favorite) and I kept wondering what was going to happen next. This is a strong story, written with a unique and smooth voice. The theme pertains to lessons in following the heart, and in endurance. I don't have much time for leisure reading, but I had to read this book cover to cover. Then I passed it along to a friend.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I cannot figure out why this book is categorized under young adult. As an adult the disturbing misuse of language and unending cliches would not quite make it enjoyable for an adult who reads anything of quality... I would suggest quality classic novels such as Jane Eyre or Wuthering Heights for "historic romantic fiction". -This book doesn't come close, isn't intellectual, and isn't keeping in language with the time period the author tries to capture..
Guest More than 1 year ago
A Poet's Moon is not a well-conceived or well-crafted book. It's misuse of language is as regular as its stilted dialogue from start to finish and the gaping holes in detail and lack of adequate backstory throughout give you a sense that the author is writing only to titillate herself. The "romance" of the piece doesn't have the substance to appeal to adults or the clarity to entertain an audience at any age. It fails as a literary work and does not even manage pop-fantasy romance as it plods oafishly along paths through heavily-clichéd fairy forests and across a fanciful "Western Europe" that is as dulcetly annoying as its model is beautiful. This book can only be called out and out pulp. And by pulp, I mean only that the book is formed of pages made of paper, made of pulp.