ISBN-10:
0130921793
ISBN-13:
9780130921796
Pub. Date:
07/01/1901
Publisher:
Pearson
Adventures in the Human Spirit / Edition 3

Adventures in the Human Spirit / Edition 3

by Philip E. Bishop

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Overview

The third edition of Adventures in the Human Spirit is now enhanced with even more of the special features that have made it the most readable and teachable single-volume survey of the humanities available. Covering the major periods, styles, and movements of the Western humanities from the ancient world to the 21st century, Adventures in the Human Spirit offers a balanced treatment of the major arts, philosophy, and religion in historical context. It is lavishly illustrated, with a greatly expanded number of color photographs. It remains, as before, enriched with features to encourage student engagement and critical thought.

New features include:

  • Summary of Key Topics now at the head of each chapter for easy overview.
  • New Key Concepts on Civilizations and Progress, Skepticism, Empiricism, Imagination, and the Human Will.
  • New coverage of Renaissance theater, Renaissance women painters and musicians, art deco, and the Mexican muralists.
  • Lavish new color illustrations throughout the text.
  • Expanded captions to capture the attention of student readers.

There are 477 illustrations, including 253 in full color and 10 color maps.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780130921796
Publisher: Pearson
Publication date: 07/01/1901
Edition description: Older Edition
Pages: 464
Product dimensions: 8.60(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.80(d)

Read an Excerpt

Preface

This third edition of Adventures in the Human Spirit enhances a book that strives to be the most readable and teachable single-volume survey of the humanities available. It summarizes historical developments in the arts, religion, philosophy, and science of the Western world, with emphasis on the connection between ideas and cultural creation. The conciseness and coherence of previous editions remain, as do the features that invite readers to begin a thoughtful and lifelong conversation with the humanities.

The most visible improvement in this edition is the welcome addition of color photographs on nearly every page – a boon to readers, who can study visual arts in detail. A summary of key topics now heads each chapter, giving readers an easy overview of what follows. I have revised the Key Concepts in several chapters, giving several a more philosophical cast. "Civilizations and Progress" (Chapter 2) considers our notions of human progress in light of recent discoveries. "Skepticism" (Chapter 9) and "Empiricism" (Chapter 10) stress the philosophical roots of the modern scientific attitude. "Imagination" (Chapter 12) and "Human Will" (Chapter 13) introduce readers to philosophical ideas that were widely applied in the art, literature, and science of the nineteenth-century West. In each case, these concepts can be connected to other themes in each chapter and to the culture and values of our contemporary world.

Other sections of the text have been revised following recent scholarship. The treatment of Italian Renaissance culture gives greater space to women musicians and to the Italians' innovations in theatrical design. The achievements ofwomen are accorded more attention, from the Renaissance painter Sofonisba Anguissola to the photographer Imogen Cunningham. In the twentieth century, I have added brief discussions of the Mexican muralists, art deco design, and classical Hollywood cinema. The last chapter ends with pointed examples of the truly global culture that is emerging as the new century begins. Many of these new topics are punctuated by attractive new illustrations.

These additions have been achieved without adding to the book's length or bulk, in keeping with its primary aim: to be the one volume on Western art and ideas that readers will keep on their shelf for a lifetime. I trust that students using this book will find a text that they can read and understand on their own. I hope they also find the questions that provoke them to question, debate, and explore far beyond the boundaries of these four hundred and fifty or so pages.

I am grateful to many for their assistance in making this edition possible. My most important critics have been students at Valencia Community College and the University of Central Florida. My relentlessly enthusiastic chairman Richard Rietveld and our department staff – especially Sonia Navarro and Bunnie Jackson – provide constant encouragement. I owe much to the loyal support of my colleagues at Valencia and elsewhere. Mary Jo Pecht, Kenneth Marshall, and Donald Tuthill, among others, have provided specific assistance on this edition. At Prentice Hall, my publisher Bud Therirn and editorial supervisor Kimberly Chastain urged me on to complete this edition sooner than I thought possible. It was a pleasure to work again with Elisabeth Ingles, ever cheerful and a professional to the last detail, in producing the text. Her sharp eye saved me from many errors. Picture researcher Maureen Cowdroy found many stunning new illustrations and designers Melinda Welch and Paul Barren accommodated them into a handsome format. For reviewing the manuscript, I am indebted to:

• Cortland Bellevance, Atlantic Cape Community College
• Cyndia Susan Clegg, Pepperdine University
• Mary Francey, University of Utah
• Howard Kerner, Polk Community College and Nova Southeastern University
• Mark Luprecht, University of Arizona
• Charles Mahan, Chattanooga State Technical Community College
• David Simmons, Brevard Community College
• James Walter, Sinclair Community College.

As they have reached college age, my children Shaughna and Aaron have become not only one reason I work at this but also a new and special audience. The other reason is Kira, my true and constant companion. This third edition is lovingly dedicated to my parnents, Harry and Verna Bishop.

Philip Bishop
Orlando, Florida
2001

Table of Contents

1. The Humanities: An Introduction to the Adventure.
Finding a Voice. The Arts. The Invitation to the Adventure.

2. The Ancient World.
The First Humans. Ancient Egypt. Early Asian Civilizations.

3. Ancient Greece: The Classical Spirit.
Early Greece. The Classical Period. The Greek Temple. Greek Sculpture. Greek Theater. Greek Philosophy. Greek Music. The Hellenistic Age.

4. Ancient Rome: The Spirit of Empire.
The Drama of Roman History. The Art of an Empire. the Architecture of Rome. Roman Art and Daily Life. Roman Theater and Music. The Roman Poets. Roman Philosophy.

5. The Judeo-Christian Spirit.
The Judaic Tradition. The Rise of Christianity. Christian Philosophy. The Christian Empires: Rome and Byzantium. Christianity and the Arts. The Rise of Islam.

6. The Early Middle Ages: The Feudal Spirit.
The Age of Charlemagne. Feudal Europe. Monasticism. The Romanesque Style. Early Medieval Music and Drama.

7. The Late Middle Ages: The Gothic Awakening.
The Gothic Awakening. Music and Theater in the Gothic Age. The New Learning. Courtly Life in the Middle Ages. Poets and Pilgrims. Prelude to the Renaissance.

8. The Renaissance Spirit in Italy.
The Renaissance in Italy. The Arts in Renaissance Florence. Early Renaissance Sculpture. Humanist Realism. The Genius of Leonardo. The High Renaissance in Rome.

9. The Northern and Late Renaissance.
The Northern Renaissance. The Reformation. Northern Renaissance Art. Humanism in the North. The Elizabethan Age. The Late Renaissance in Italy. The Venetian Renaissance and Ma

10. The Spirit of Baroque.
The Baroque in Spain. The Baroque in Italy. The Baroque in France.Music of the Protestant Baroque. The Dutch Baroque. The New Science. The English Compromise.

11. The Spirit of Enlightenment.
The Enlightenment. The Rococo Style. The Bourgeois Response. The Neoclassical Style. The Age of Satire.

12. Revolution and Romanticism.
Revolutions and Rights. The Romantic Hero. Elements of Romanticism. Romantic Demons.

13. The Industrial Age: The Spirit of Materialism.
Realism. The Spirit of Progress. Music and Modernity. The Last Romantics. Impressionism and Beyond. The Dark Side of Progress.

14. The Spirit of Modernism.
A Turbulent Century. Modernism in Art. The Freudian Revolution. Modernism in Literature. Modernist Music and Architecture. Art and Politics. In the American Grain.

15. The Contemporary Spirit.
Holocaust. Exploring the Absurd. Art in the Post-War Era. The Trials of Modern Architecture. Post-1945 Music. Post-modern Styles. The Global Culture.

Notes.
Glossary.
Bibliography.
Index.

Preface

This third edition of Adventures in the Human Spirit enhances a book that strives to be the most readable and teachable single-volume survey of the humanities available. It summarizes historical developments in the arts, religion, philosophy, and science of the Western world, with emphasis on the connection between ideas and cultural creation. The conciseness and coherence of previous editions remain, as do the features that invite readers to begin a thoughtful and lifelong conversation with the humanities.

The most visible improvement in this edition is the welcome addition of color photographs on nearly every page – a boon to readers, who can study visual arts in detail. A summary of key topics now heads each chapter, giving readers an easy overview of what follows. I have revised the Key Concepts in several chapters, giving several a more philosophical cast. "Civilizations and Progress" (Chapter 2) considers our notions of human progress in light of recent discoveries. "Skepticism" (Chapter 9) and "Empiricism" (Chapter 10) stress the philosophical roots of the modern scientific attitude. "Imagination" (Chapter 12) and "Human Will" (Chapter 13) introduce readers to philosophical ideas that were widely applied in the art, literature, and science of the nineteenth-century West. In each case, these concepts can be connected to other themes in each chapter and to the culture and values of our contemporary world.

Other sections of the text have been revised following recent scholarship. The treatment of Italian Renaissance culture gives greater space to women musicians and to the Italians' innovations in theatrical design. The achievements of women are accordedmore attention, from the Renaissance painter Sofonisba Anguissola to the photographer Imogen Cunningham. In the twentieth century, I have added brief discussions of the Mexican muralists, art deco design, and classical Hollywood cinema. The last chapter ends with pointed examples of the truly global culture that is emerging as the new century begins. Many of these new topics are punctuated by attractive new illustrations.

These additions have been achieved without adding to the book's length or bulk, in keeping with its primary aim: to be the one volume on Western art and ideas that readers will keep on their shelf for a lifetime. I trust that students using this book will find a text that they can read and understand on their own. I hope they also find the questions that provoke them to question, debate, and explore far beyond the boundaries of these four hundred and fifty or so pages.

I am grateful to many for their assistance in making this edition possible. My most important critics have been students at Valencia Community College and the University of Central Florida. My relentlessly enthusiastic chairman Richard Rietveld and our department staff – especially Sonia Navarro and Bunnie Jackson – provide constant encouragement. I owe much to the loyal support of my colleagues at Valencia and elsewhere. Mary Jo Pecht, Kenneth Marshall, and Donald Tuthill, among others, have provided specific assistance on this edition. At Prentice Hall, my publisher Bud Therirn and editorial supervisor Kimberly Chastain urged me on to complete this edition sooner than I thought possible. It was a pleasure to work again with Elisabeth Ingles, ever cheerful and a professional to the last detail, in producing the text. Her sharp eye saved me from many errors. Picture researcher Maureen Cowdroy found many stunning new illustrations and designers Melinda Welch and Paul Barren accommodated them into a handsome format. For reviewing the manuscript, I am indebted to:

• Cortland Bellevance, Atlantic Cape Community College
• Cyndia Susan Clegg, Pepperdine University
• Mary Francey, University of Utah
• Howard Kerner, Polk Community College and Nova Southeastern University
• Mark Luprecht, University of Arizona
• Charles Mahan, Chattanooga State Technical Community College
• David Simmons, Brevard Community College
• James Walter, Sinclair Community College.

As they have reached college age, my children Shaughna and Aaron have become not only one reason I work at this but also a new and special audience. The other reason is Kira, my true and constant companion. This third edition is lovingly dedicated to my parnents, Harry and Verna Bishop.

Philip Bishop
Orlando, Florida
2001

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