Arthur Rimbaud: Complete Works

Arthur Rimbaud: Complete Works

by Arthur Rimbaud

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Overview

One of the world's most influential poets, Arthur Rimbaud (1854-1891) is remembered as much for his volatile personality and tumultuous life as he is for his writings, almost all of which he produced before the age of twenty. Paul Schmidt's acclaimed collection brings together his complete poetry, prose, and letters, including "The Drunken Boat," "The Orphans' New Year," "After the Flood," and "A Season in Hell." Complete Works is divided into eight "seasons"—Childhood, the Open Road, War, the Tormented Heart, the Visionary, the Damned Soul, a Few Belated Cowardices, and the Man with the Wind at His Heels—that reflect the facets of Rimbaud's life. Insightful commentary by Schmidt reveals the courage, vision, and imagination of Rimbaud's poetry and sheds light on one of the most enigmatic figures in letters.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780061561771
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 07/01/2008
Series: P.S. Series
Pages: 400
Sales rank: 596,804
Product dimensions: 5.30(w) x 7.90(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Arthur Rimbaud, born in 1854 in Charleville, France, is hailed as the father of Symbolism. His most famous works of poetry include The Drunken Boat and A Season in Hell. He died in 1891.

Paul Schmidt was, in addition to a translator, a playwright, actor, and author of two books of poetry.

Read an Excerpt

Arthur Rimbaud: Complete Works

The Orphans' New Year

I

The room is full of shadows; vaguely heard, The soft, sad whispers of two tiny babes. Their faces, heavy still with sleep, peck out Through long white curtains that shake and swirl ... -Outside, the shivering birds hop near; Their wings are numb beneath the dark gray sky; And New Year's Day, with all her foggy troop, Dragging along the folds of her snowy gown, Smiles through tears, and, shivering, sings her song.

II

And the little children behind the flapping curtainSpeak soft and low as in the dark of night.They listen, sunk in thought, to a distant hum ...They tremble often at the golden voiceOf the morning bell, which strikes and strikes againIts metal chime within a globe of glass ...And oh, the room is cold ... in heaps about the floorAround the bed, we see black mourning clothes:The bitter wind that howls before the doorSighs round about the house with gloomy breath!We feel, in all of this, a certain lack-Do these small children have no mother, then,No smiling mother, with triumphant eyes?She must that night have forgotten, bending alone,To blow the naked coals again to flame,To tuck the blanket and the quilt around themBefore she left them, saying "pardon me."Could she not have foreseen the morning's cold,Nor closed the door against the wintry blast? ...

A dream of mother is a cozy comforter,A cotton-covered nest where snuggling children lie,As pretty drowsing birds in swaying branchesSleep their sweet sleep, their soft white dreams!But here-this is some cheerless, featherless nestWhere the young are cold, afraid, and cannotsleep;A nest quite frozen by the bitter wind ...

III

Your heart tells you the truth-they have no mother. No mother in the house! And a father far away! An old housekeeper, then, took them in charge. The children are alone in the icy house: Orphans at four, now in their hearts and minds A happy memory by degrees revives, As bead by bead, we tell a rosary: Ah! What a wondrous morning, New Year's Day! Each one, that night, had dreamed a dream of gifts, The strangest dream, where he saw heaps of toys That whirled about, dancing a noisy dance, Then hid behind the curtain, then appeared once more! And in the morning they would hop from bed With a foretaste of sugarplums, rubbing their eyes ... They would go, hair tousled on their heads, Their eyes shining brightly, as on holidays, Their bare little feet skimming the floor, To tap very softly at their parents' door ... They let them in! Then came greetings, laughing loud, And kisses upon kisses, and happiness allowed!

IV

Ah! How lovely, those words said over and over! But how that house of long ago has changed!

A huge fire once burned brightly on the hearth, And lit up every corner of the room; The red reflections coming from the fire Would dance upon the polished furniture ... The cabinet's keys were gone! No cabinet keys! They kept on glancing at its dark old doors ... No keys! How strange it was! They often thought Of mysteries waiting in its wooden heart And thought they heard, beyond the beckoning Keyhole, a distant sound, a distant happy hum ... Their parents' room is quite empty today: No red reflections come from beneath the door: There are no parents, hearth, or hidden keys, And hence no kisses and no sweet surprises! Oh, how sad their New Year's Day will be! And thoughtfully, while from their big blue eyes Begins to fall a silent bitter tear, They murmur: "When will we see our mother dear?"

V

Now the little ones are sadly fast asleep: You would say, to see them, that, slumbering, they wept. Their eyes are swollen so, their breathing heavy! The hearts of little children are so sensitive! -But a guardian angel wipes away their tears And to their heavy slumber brings a happy dream, A dream so happy that their parted lips, Smiling, seem to murmur something out loud ... They dream that from under their small round arms, -Sweet gesture of awakening-they peep out; Their sleepy eyes begin to look around themThey think they have slept in a rosy paradise! In the bright reflecting hearth a fire sings. Beyond the window shines a bright blue sky;

Nature awakes and bathes in shining rays ... The half-bare earth, happy to be revived, Shivers with joy at the kisses of the sun, And in the old house all is warm and red: The somber clothes no longer lie about, The biting wind has finally died awayYou would think a good fairy had just passed by! The children, happy, cried for delight, for there, Beside the bed, in a beautiful rosy light, There, on the carpet, something wondrous shone: Two silvery medallions, black and white, Of shining mother-of-pearl and glittering jet; Little black frames whose covers of glass unfold, And the words "To Our Mother" engraved in gold.

Arthur Rimbaud: Complete Works. Copyright © by Arthur Rimbaud. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

Table of Contents

Translator's Introduction xiii
First Season Childhood 1(40)
Prologue
5(5)
"Ver erat"
10(1)
"It Was Springtime"
11(3)
The Orphans' New Year
14(3)
The Blacksmith
17(6)
Credo in Unam
23(5)
Feelings
28(1)
Ophilia
28(2)
The Hanged Men Dance
30(1)
Kids in a Daze
31(2)
Tartufe Chastised
33(1)
First Evening
33(2)
Romance
35(1)
By the Bandstand
36(2)
Letter
38(3)
Second Season The Open Road 41(16)
Faun's Head
44(1)
The Sideboard
44(1)
The Tease
45(1)
At the Green Cabaret
45(1)
Wandering
46(1)
Dream in Wintertime
47(1)
What Nina Answered
47(4)
The Customs Men
51(2)
Letters
53(4)
Third Season War 57(16)
"You dead of ninety-two and ninety-three"
60(1)
The Brilliant Victory of Saarebruck
60(1)
Evil
61(1)
Asleep in the Valley
62(1)
Angry Caesar
62(1)
Parisian War Cry
63(1)
The Hands of Jeanne-Marie
64(3)
Parisian Orgy
67(2)
Crows
69(2)
Letter
71(2)
Fourth Season The Tormented Heart 73(58)
Evening Prayer
77(1)
The Sitters
77(2)
Squatting
79(1)
Poor People in Church
80(2)
Venus Anadyomene
82(1)
My Little Lovelies
82(2)
The Sisters of Charity
84(2)
The Ladies Who Look for Lice
86(1)
Seven-Year-Old Poets
86(3)
First Communions
89(5)
"The Savior bumped upon his heavy butt"
94(2)
"What do we care, my heart"
96(1)
The Stolen Heart
97(1)
A Heart Beneath a Cassock
98(15)
Letters
113(18)
Fifth Season The Visionary 131(84)
The Drunken Boat
136(3)
Vowels
139(1)
"The sun has wept rose"
140(1)
Rimbaud's Contributions to the Album Zutique
140(9)
Stupra: Three Scatological Sonnets
149(1)
The Wastelands of Love
150(2)
Fragments from the Book of John
152(3)
"O seasons, O chateaus!"
155(1)
Remembrance
155(2)
Tear
157(1)
The Comedy of Thirst
158(3)
"Hear how it bellows"
161(1)
Lovely Thoughts for Morning
162(1)
Michael and Christine
163(1)
The River of Cordial
164(1)
The Triumph of Patience
164(5)
The Newlyweds at Home
169(1)
Brussels
170(1)
"Does she dance?"
171(1)
The Triumph of Hunger
172(1)
Shame
173(1)
Childhood
173(4)
Tale
177(1)
Parade
178(1)
Antique
179(1)
Being Beauteous
180(1)
Fairy
181(1)
Vigils
181(2)
Mystique
183(1)
Dawn
183(1)
Flowers
184(1)
Ordinary Nocturne
185(1)
Seascape
186(1)
Winter Festival
186(1)
Scenes
187(1)
Bottom
187(1)
H
188(1)
Democracy
189(1)
Historic Evening
189(2)
Letters
191(24)
Sixth Season The Damned Soul 215(30)
A Season in Hell:
219(1)
"Once, if my memory serves me well"
219(1)
Bad Blood
220(5)
Night in Hell
225(2)
First Delirium: The Foolish Virgin
227(5)
Second Delirium: The Alchemy of the Word
232(6)
The Impossible
238(3)
Lightning
241(1)
Morning
241(1)
Farewell
242(3)
Seventh Season A Few Belated Cowardices 245(38)
After the Flood
249(1)
Vagabonds
250(1)
Lines
251(2)
Devotion
253(1)
To a Reason
254(1)
Drunken Morning
254(2)
Lives
256(1)
Departure
257(1)
Royalty
258(1)
Workers
258(1)
Bridges
259(1)
City
260(1)
Wheel Ruts
261(1)
Promontory
261(1)
Cities I
262(2)
Cities II
264(2)
Metropolitan
266(1)
Anguish
267(1)
Barbarian
268(1)
War
269(1)
Movement
270(1)
Sale
271(1)
Genie
272(2)
Youth
274(3)
Letters
277(6)
Eighth Season The Man with the Wind at His Heels 283(58)
Letters
287(54)
About Arthur Rimbaud 341(4)
Index of English Titles 345(4)
Index of French Titles 349(4)
Index of First Lines 353

What People are Saying About This

Raymond Sokolov

Arthur Rimbaud was a disreputable, mean, ruthless, perverse, hateful wretch. He was also one of the greatest poet who ever lived...

"Schmidt has tackled poems, prose, and letters. He has adopted a new and persuasive chronological arrangement of the work. And he has nimbly compressed the life of the poet into engaging prefaces for each of the eight 'seasons.'...Schmidt has truly made Rimbaud his won. Like every good translation, his is an interpretation. And it is a matter of some astonishment to me that he has done as well as he has with lyrics that, in theory, ought to defy transfer into another language. He has found a tone, pr perhaps it is an idiom, that works.

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Arthur Rimbaud: Complete Works 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
IlPrincipe More than 1 year ago
I've always appreciated the writings of Arthur Rimbaud, but whether in the original French or in tanslation, I've often thrown up my hands at trying to understand his writing. This new translation makes him much more accessible. It is still a challenge reap the full significance of what he writes in some of the prose and poems here. Paul Schmidt has listened to Rimbaud and, in this book, performs the drama of Rimbaud's life in words and phrasing that speak dramatically and intelligibly.
apc251 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Every young man should read this, at least those serious about life, love, literature, and art. I was in my early twenties and was told about it by a friend in college. I was in the process of deranging my own senses at the time and it was a wonderful roadmap.
jenesuispas on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Schmidt's way of translating these poems is seen by many as controversial, in some ways he almost rewrites poems to make them fit a certain structure. What makes this so special? Rimbaud paid close attention to the structure in his own original poetry, they were considered ingeniously song-like and lyrical by his contemporaries. Schmidt manages to imitate this without changing too much of the content--he merely "swirls" it around, preserving the wit and beauty in Rimbaud's language along with the scatology. Just compare "The Stolen Heart" to any other version.
poetontheone on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
It is not even necessary to mention that Rimbaud's succinct oeuvre of poetry, all written before the age of 20, had a profound impact on Modern Literature. His poetry is replete with vivid and decadent imagery. These poems, accompanied by a selection of letters, give the reader a startling glimpse into a restless soul. Schmidt's rhythmic and fluid translation only heightens this intimacy. Rimbaud is a poet not to be passed over.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
The translation was the first I have read and the one I really like. The poem 'Romance' is wonderful in this book.