Bluenote Café

Bluenote Café

by Neil Young

CD

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Overview

Neil Young is famous as a man who is going to do what he wants, and he's willing to pounce on a moment's inspiration and run with it if it pleases him. In 1987, Young decided he wanted to set aside rock & roll for a while and play the blues, and that's just what he did. He recruited his longtime musical partners Crazy Horse (Frank Sampedro on keys, Billy Talbot on bass, and Ralph Molina on drums), added a six-piece horn section (led by Steve Lawrence on tenor sax), and called the new band the Bluenotes, hitting the road with the new act in late 1987. In 1988, Young cut an album with the Bluenotes, This Note's for You, and toured some more with the group before deciding he wanted to move back to topical songwriting with 1989's Freedom, leaving the Bluenotes behind for good. Bluenote Café is an installment in Young's Neil Young Archives series that documents his 1987-1988 concerts with the Bluenotes; unlike most of the NYA releases, this doesn't present a single show, but stitches together highlights from 11 different gigs from November 1987 to August 1988. One of the unusual aspects of Young's Bluenotes period is that the format of the band didn't adapt itself well to his back catalog, so with the exception of a 19-minute workout on "Tonight's the Night," pretty much everything here is unique to this particular ensemble, and while it might have been interesting to hear Young rework some of his more primal material with a bluesy spin, that doesn't happen. But there are a number of otherwise unrecorded tunes here that merit preservation, particularly the lean, funky "Doghouse" and the tough but playful "Ain't It the Truth," and the performances here are consistently solid. Crazy Horse don't sound as exciting when reduced to a rhythm section, but they give this music a solid foundation and a deep groove, and if the horn section has only so many moves, they're emphatic and drive these songs home with impressive force. And the Bluenotes were a fine showcase for Young's guitar work; he doesn't spin off many epic solos here as he does with most of his electric bands, but the urgent, brittle tone of Young's guitar is a great match for his brief bursts of six-string fury, recalling a wired and feral version of Albert Collins. As a two-disc set, Bluenote Café feels a bit overstuffed and drawn out, but these recordings confirm the Bluenotes hold up better than many of Young's creative left turns in the '80s, and this is a thorough and entertaining look at an often overlooked phase in Young's creative journey.

Product Details

Release Date: 11/13/2015
Label: Reprise / Wea
UPC: 0093624926108
catalogNumber: 550219
Rank: 24905

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Neil Young   Primary Artist,Guitar,Vocals
Ben Keith   Alto Saxophone
John Fumo   Trumpet,Group Member
Claude Cailliet   Trombone,Group Member
Larry Cragg   Baritone Saxophone
Chad Cromwell   Drums,Group Member
Steve Lawrence   Tenor Saxophone
Ralph Molina   Drums,Group Member
Rick Rosas   Bass,Group Member
Billy Talbot   Bass,Group Member
Tom Bray   Trumpet,Group Member
Frank Sampedro   Keyboards,Group Member

Technical Credits

Neil Young   Composer,Producer
Niko Bolas   Producer
Gary Burden   Art Direction
Henry Diltz   Inside Photo
John Hanlon   Assistant Post Production
Elliot Roberts   Direction
Aaron Rapoport   Back Cover Photo
Jenice Heo   Art Direction
Jack Harper   Cover Photo

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Bluenote Café 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
glauver More than 1 year ago
During 1987 and 88 Neil Young formed a band called the Bluenotes, toured with them, and released an album called This Note's For You. The sound was blues with horns, at the time a new style for Young. He discarded it and returned to basics for Freedom and Ragged Glory, resuscitating his career. Now, almost 30 years later, he has dipped into his archives and released this double disc live album. It is surprisingly good, at least in the top five NY live releases. The band is tighter and more nimble than Crazy Horse and the horn section sounds like it belongs. Many of the songs were recorded again for the album, some were never released, and a few were remakes. Here is my list of highlights; Life In The City, Twilight, Ordinary People (later on Chrome Dreams II), Crime in The City (more muscular than Freedom), the bozo Doghouse, and the Buffalo Springfield remake On The Way Home. The set ends with a spooky 19 minute Tonight's The Night.