ISBN-10:
0801829771
ISBN-13:
9780801829772
Pub. Date:
10/01/1982
Publisher:
Johns Hopkins University Press
The Building of Renaissance Florence: An Economic and Social History / Edition 1

The Building of Renaissance Florence: An Economic and Social History / Edition 1

by Richard A. Goldthwaite
Current price is , Original price is $34.0. You

Temporarily Out of Stock Online

Please check back later for updated availability.

Overview

Awarded the Howard R. Marraro Prize by the American Historical Association

"Always fascinating... The reader will get from Goldthwaite's book on the economics of architecture a more lively and more authentic impression of life in Renaissance Florence than from many more general descriptions of Florentine culture." — Felix Gilbert, New York Review of Books.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780801829772
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
Publication date: 10/01/1982
Edition description: REISSUE
Pages: 480
Product dimensions: 5.88(w) x 9.00(h) x (d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Richard A. Goldthwaite is professor emeritus of history at the Johns Hopkins University. He is the author of The Building of Renaissance Florence: An Economic and Social History and Wealth and the Demand for Art in Italy, 1300–1600, both also published by Johns Hopkins.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

The Building of Renaissance Florence: An Economic and Social History 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
mbluelivesay on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a comprehensive recounting of Florence as a cultural center. It details the moral and ethical climate which gave rise to surplus income, which in turn led to "conspicuous consumption", which eventually gave us the rich cultural treasure which is Florence today. He includes lengthy discussions of the influence of the Medicis and others and goes into great detail about the organization of construction of the great edifices and the manner in which they were funded and planned. There is, for instance, a good deal of information about the manner in which "architects" were drawn from the ranks of masons, carpenters, and other craftsman, as well as an in-depth discussion of the impact of Alberti and the manner in which he wrote mainly for the persons most likely to commission great structures, rather than for those who would build them.All in all, this is a very readable and informative book.