Brainjack

Brainjack

by Brian Falkner

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Overview

Another terrifying sci-fi page-turner from the author of The Tomorrow Code!

Las Vegas is gone—destroyed in a terrorist attack. Black Hawk helicopters patrol the skies over New York City. And immersive online gaming is the most dangerous street drug around. In this dystopic near-future, technology has leapt forward once again, and neuro-headsets have replaced computer keyboards. Just slip on a headset, and it’s the Internet at the speed of thought.



For teen hacker Sam Wilson, a headset is a must. But as he becomes familiar with the new technology, he has a terrifying realization. If anything on his computer is vulnerable to a hack, what happens when his mind is linked to the system? Could consciousness itself be hijacked? Before he realizes what’s happened, Sam’s incursion against the world’s largest telecommunications company leads him to the heart of the nation’s cyberdefense network and brings him face to face with a terrifying and unforeseen threat.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780648287971
Publisher: Falkner Specialty Books
Publication date: 05/23/2019
Pages: 320
Product dimensions: 5.24(w) x 7.99(h) x 0.72(d)
Age Range: 13 - 18 Years

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Brain Jack 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 75 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good book
code7r More than 1 year ago
"Brain Jack" by Brian Falkner is a story about a 17 year old boy named Sam Wilson who is a genius hacker who, after bringing "the United States of America to its knees," is recruited to work for Homeland Security. This book was a wild ride and a peek into the minds of computer geniuses. If you ever wondered how you can have an action thriller book about computers and hacking, then this is a good book for you. The book as well paced and the characters become people who you root for. I really enjoyed this book and it is relevant to our present day. Sam is presented as an intelligent and mature teenager and would definitely hit a note with teenagers reading the book. I will definitely be seeking out other books by this author!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was hard for me to get into it at first, but about a third of the way into the the plot really started to form. Before that it seemed like a bunch of mosltly information that did not work with the plot, such as sams friend fargas who you do not see the rest the book. The ending seemed a bit quick also and i was hoping for something about meeting up with his family or with the other people he befriended a CDD. This was an amazing bok in all, and i hope that you read it sometime ( if you havent already). You may like it if you enjoy Science fiction Computors Action Hacking
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
Sam Wilson is a hacker; perhaps one of the best in the world. He can hack into any computer system, no matter what type of security is used. Your information is definitely not safe from him. The government knows this; their solution - put Sam on their team. Sam and his group of hackers work to keep "them" out of the United States Internet system. No one actually knows who "they" are, but they're out there and are constantly trying to get at classified information. One entity, known as Ursula, wants more than information. She wants total control of the human consciousness. Sam and his cohorts won't let that happen. Not unlike Cory Doctorow's LITTLE BROTHER and FOR THE WIN, Falkner presents a scenario that deals with cyber-terrorism/espionage. If you aren't a techie, don't worry; context clues are a wonderful thing, and Falkner makes the story accessible to all readers. Much of what he discusses read like Sanskrit to me, but it didn't matter because the story itself was so engaging. I thoroughly enjoyed this novel, and am excited to see what the author has in store for us next!
AngelaCinVA on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
From the opening words of the prologue, I was hooked. The premise of this book is scarily believable. In an America where Las Vegas has been destroyed by a nuclear explosion, the Department of Homeland Security¿s Cyber Defense Division recruits top teen hackers to protect the nation¿s computer systems. But a new danger arises as more people begin to use neuro-headsets to connect their minds directly to their computers. Can that technology be used to manipulate people¿s memories and control their actions? It takes a little while for Falkner to set up the scenario. But once the action begins, the pace is breath-taking! The writing is so vivid, I found myself tensing up, pulse racing, as I turned the pages. I am a bit uncertain how I feel about the ending. It seemed a bit too quick and clean. But the rest of the book is so good, I¿ll gladly forgive that.
RosanaSantana on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Sam, a teen age hacker, manages to hack the White House, but ends up arrested. His escape from prison is actually the final interview to work as "technical support" for the government. Then something goes terribly wrong. The book starts off slow but then becomes very exciting. Recommended read.
ALelliott on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
For students:If your brain is like a computer, could someone one day hack it? And if they could hack your brain, how would you know? These questions are at the center of Brian Faulkner's cyberthriller, Brain Jack. Sam Wilson is a genius computer hacker; he can even hack the White House. But when he gets caught by Homeland Security, he is plunged into a world where it's possible to plug your brain into a network just like a laptop. Where people can have memories downloaded directly into their minds. Where connection to a network could mean a direct connection to other people's brains.This book will keep you on the edge of your seat. It's full of action, both virtual and literal. One caveat: Falkner's use of computer terminology can get a little overwhelming at times for people who are not intimate with programming and network systems. But he is great at describing things in such a way that you are able to visualize them. Check out this book for a terrifying, all-too possible glimpse at the future.For educators and librarians:For advanced readers who don't mind using contextual clues to figure out what is going on. Very exciting book, but could be confusing for some kids.Reading level: 13 and up.Appropriateness: Mild cussing, nothing worse than "damn."Who would like this book: computer loving kids who will appreciate Faulkner's vase knowledge, kids who want an action novel and don't mind a challenge.
HeatherMS on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
"Brain Jack" by Brian Falkner is a story about a 17 year old boy named Sam Wilson who is a genius hacker who, after bringing "the United States of America to its knees," is recruited to work for Homeland Security.This book was a wild ride and a peek into the minds of computer geniuses. If you ever wondered how you can have an action thriller book about computers and hacking, then this is a good book for you. The book as well paced and the characters become people who you root for.I really enjoyed this book and it is relevant to our present day. Sam is presented as an intelligent and mature teenager and would definitely hit a note with teenagers reading the book.I will definitely be seeking out other books by this author!
callmecayce on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A fast-paced enjoyable cyberpunk-ish science fiction novel. I liked Sam, the main character, quite a bit. In some ways, he reminded me of Case from Neuromancer. The tech jargon was almost a turn off in the beginning, but the plot was strong enough that I wasn't going to stop reading. As an aside, I secretly hope they turn this into a movie because I would be at opening night.
mrsderaps on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
In a not distant future, Sam Wilson is a tech geek who gets in trouble after carrying out a huge hack that shuts down power to much of America. But, this America is not the one we're used to now. Las Vegas is literally crumbled, there are cameras everywhere, and criminals from all over the world are encroaching on the US via sophisticated computer viruses and pyrotechnics.Because of Sam's talent, he is recruited for the dream job that he never knew existed: to work for the US in the Cyber Defense sector of the Homeland Security Department. He is paid very well, but the stakes are high: He is constantly in physical and mental danger. The physical danger is obvious, but the mental danger does not occur to him until it's too late. The advanced neuro-headset that allows him to control his computer without a keyboard or mouse may also re-wire his brain. His thoughts may no longer be his own, but under the control of the very terrorists he's trying to fight.I was afraid when I first started reading this book that I would be lost in the technological terms and the computer nerd-speak. Not true. It was not only very readable, but also pretty suspenseful. I definitely read this quickly, even though it's not a read that is typical for me. If you enjoy Cory Doctorow (of Little Brother and For the Win), or liked the movie War Games back in 1983, you might like this book. It has a bit of a dystopic element to it, but the world-changing events that lead up to the story are not explained in great detail. Overall, this is a great read that left me with lots of thoughts about technology and how it's changing our world.
amandacb on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Brain Jack is a very specialized novel that involves technical language¿luckily, I love that kind of stuff, so I found all the jargon very interesting. The novel is obviously extremely farfetched, but I suspended belief for the time I read it and enjoyed it for what it was¿pure fiction. Sam Wilson is a high school kid who also happens to be a genius computer hacker. When he pulls off a hack that leaves even the government scratching it heads, he is recruited by a top government agency to work for them. However, when this agency and other users begin to use a new technology, called a headset, that relies on brain power to activate computer commands, the technology goes awry and begins to control the humans. Sam, a purist who does not necessarily need or want to use a headset, is one of the few who realizes this, and it is up to him to save the world, essentially. Car chases, a nuclear bombed-out Las Vegas, and computer trickery abound.I think the premise of the novel is a sound one¿that technology can take over our lives if we are not careful to ensure we are using it to supplement our tasks, not take over them.
ewyatt on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Sam is an expert hacker who is recruited to work for Homeland Security to protect America's information infrastructure. When neuroheadsets gain popularity, a new threat emerges as people begin to have implanted memories. Sam and his crew go on the run to try to stop the brain jacking before it is too late. The pace picked up in the middle of the story. The beginning is really heavy with techno-speak and descriptions of sophisticated hacks.
JRlibrary on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Sam Wilson is a very talented teen hacker, who, as a result of his expertise, comes under the attention of Homeland security. After a series of "tests" or interview situations, he is hired to help protect the nation's databases. Before he really settles into the job, those databases are attacked by computer terrorists, and Sam and his friend are accused of being traitors and must go on the run to avoid being killed. Falkner has education in computer science, and you can certainly tell when reading the book because the computer portions of the book are quite convincing.
stephxsu on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
In the future United States, a savvy teen hacker named Sam breaks into the nation¿s largest telecommunications office system to order himself a top-of-the-line neuro-headset and inadvertently causes a several-day meltdown of the US¿s network. Because of this, Sam is courted by a top government computer security organization to put his skills to good use. However, Sam and his coworkers do not anticipate a new threat that awaits them. As the world turns from traditional keyboard-and-mouse technology to the faster hands-free neuro-headset, the power of society¿s collective conscience may prove to be the most dangerous weapon ever accidentally created.BRAIN JACK is an edge-of-your-seat cyberthriller stuffed full of technical jargon. It will definitely not appeal to everyone, particularly those who like their characters more developed and the storytelling tighter, but if you¿re interested in an absorbing, probably-too-smart-for-its-own-good thriller, then this is an interesting choice.I of course like well-developed characters, but I can make exceptions when the author can convince me that he knows what he¿s talking about with the premise¿even if he doesn¿t. And Brian Falkner convinced me. I don¿t consider myself particularly technologically savvy, especially for the mechanics of computer hardware and the Internet, but I found myself enjoying the characters¿ unending technical term-dropping. It sucked me right into a cyber-world that I knew very little about, and so I was sufficiently impressed by the terminology used to get into the story.Where BRAIN JACK started unraveling for me was upon the introduction of the book¿s main nemesis. I won¿t spoil it for interested readers, but the idea is conceivable if we stretch our imaginations a bit. However, the book then resorts to wince-inducing action-adventure elements to force the plot along. These include: a getaway vehicle, a remote hideaway, and the obligatory car-and-gun chase, among others. It turns out that I was more satisfied with the world-building than with the actual plot of this book.In terms of quality, there are better books out there, but if you¿re looking into trying out a cyberthriller and are okay with the other flaws that I¿ve mentioned, then this will make for one hell of a ride.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoy this book a lot but, this book gets complicated at times but other than that i reccomend you read this book if you are interested in technology
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was very interesting and kept u wanting to read more, but the ending was very confusing and a little weird. Overall I would recommend this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Brain jack is a book witten for geeks. A must buy!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was so good!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is one of my all time favorites
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great book in all but for people who cant understand things about a computer just skip over it you will be happy you did because it is very action packed and well developed
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
S o
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Im gonna read it again
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am fifteen, and I absolutely loved reading this book. Some of the computer terms were difficult to understand at first, but the author made the book readable anyways. I would recommend this book to anyone who uses the internet and loves to read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago