Dead Waters (Simon Canderous Series #4)

Dead Waters (Simon Canderous Series #4)

by Anton Strout

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Overview

Simon Canderous, of the Department of Extraordinary Affairs, is used to fighting vampires and zombies. But the strange murder of a professor has everyone stumped. And it's making some people crazy. Literally.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780441020119
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 02/22/2011
Series: Simon Canderous Series , #4
Pages: 352
Product dimensions: 6.56(w) x 4.22(h) x 0.96(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Anton Strout is the author of the Simon Canderous novels and the Spellmason Chronicles. He lives in New York.

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Dead Waters (Simon Canderous Series #4) 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 18 reviews.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In Manhattan's Columbus Circle, Department Of Extraordinary Affairs Other Worldly Division field agent Simon Canderous and his girlfriend Jane Clayton-Forrester of Greater and Lesser Arcana Division are off the clock doing a favor for vampire Aidan Christos. Customer complains about a spirit haunting an antique store the Undead own; vampires are unable to bite or punch ghosts. The pair rid the store of the insane ghost, but psychometric Simon absorbs tons of negative emotion from the sick spirit. No time for rest for the weary as the pair attends a meeting called by Simon's boss Inspectre Qumbley who explains to Jane, Simon and his partner Connor Christos that David Davidson of the Mayor's Office of Plausibility Deniability needs the help of DEA. Davidson explains that a murder of Professor Mason Redfield has shaken up NYPD. Quimbley is shook too as he knows Mason. The three agents visit the homicide scene in which Mason drowned without a struggle as there is no water on his clothing or on the floor; only in his lungs. The case spins wetter and weirder while Simon struggles to control emotional overload and the need for a chest of drawers. The latest Canderous urban fantasy (see Dead To Me, Deader Still and Dead Matter) contains the usual defense mechanism banter used by the field agents to relieve the emotions of some of the gruesome adversaries they dive after in "mortal" combat. City budget cuts provide further comic relief as those risking their lives for a government paycheck are told the phony platitude to do more with less although they already spend 90% of their work time in deadly inquiries and 120% time on bureaucratic paper required by fiscal cookie-cutters. Fast-paced even off the clock, readers will enjoy Anton Strout's Dead twisting investigative thriller with a stunning climax. Harriet Klausner
pollywannabook on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Review courtesy of All Things Urban FantasyI get stupidly excited by acronyms in Urban Fantasy. Covert, or otherwise, organizations that deal with the supernatural and have names like the IS (Inderland Security) from the Rachel Morgan series, the UDA (Underworld Detection Agency) from the upcoming series of the same name by Hannah Jayne, or the ITF (Integration Task Force) from the Charlie Madigan series. I¿m fascinated by the bureaucratic side of paranormal worlds. It¿s that little element of order in a world that breaks all the rules that draws me in every time. In this case it¿s the DEA (Department Of Extraordinary Affairs) from the Simon Canderous series. Other Worldly Division field agent Simon is a bit of a head scratcher for me. He¿s a capable early 20¿s psychometric (meaning he has the ability to `read¿ the history of an object by touching it), he has a longtime girlfriend in the form of fellow agent Jane Clayton-Forrester with whom he¿s considering taking a big relationship step with, and he¿s often the go to guy for jobs no one else can--or wants--to handle. Given all that, I was really caught off guard by how immature he was. It probably didn¿t help that most of the other men in DEAD WATERS kept calling him `Kid¿ or `Son.¿ I had to keep reminding myself that I wasn¿t reading about some fourteen year old. I also had some issues with the pacing and plot. There¿s always a whole lot of talking around an issue before someone cuts in with a `so the real issue is¿¿ or `so here¿s what we know¿¿ It was frustrating and severely stunted the pace. On top of that, the basic plot was just not compelling until the very end. Simon and Jane spend most of of DEAD WATERS running around Manhattan trying to solve a supernatural murder and track down a water nymph. There was a nice twist at the end that involved some Greek mythology which I always love, and the relationship issues between Simon and Jane provided a few nice occasional breaks, but overall I found myself just treading water through most of this book. Jumping in mid series is always a gamble as you never know how much backstory you¿re missing, or if you¿re lacking some vital piece of information that¿s integral to the enjoyment of the latest book. Maybe that¿s the case with DEAD WATERS. If not, I¿m sorry to say that the potential of this book was wasted on me.Sexual Content: Kissing
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bravewarrior More than 1 year ago
In this fourth installment of the Simon Canderous series, Simon and Connor are called to a murder scene. It may have been that I have spring fever, or it may have been the book, but I did have a hard time reading the first half of the book. It was a regurgitation of facts from the first three books that include unlikely dialog. Simon spends a lot of pages getting teased whether he understands the cohabitation hints Jane is giving him. The second half of the book, I read in two days. It was a page turner, but not as good as the first three books, which I rave about. The ending does bring more problems that will be answered in a fifth book. Best dialog regrading budget cuts in the Department of Extraordinary Affairs: "Are you, like the Men in Black".... No, they're fictional. You know that, don't you... Because they have a huge budget and unlimited resources."
Paul_Genesse More than 1 year ago
Dead Waters by Anton Strout is the best of the series so far. Strout's comedic writing style has matured, though his main character still has a ways to go, which is part of the fun. Simon is a wise-cracking machine-and a zombie skull crushing machine, with his telescoping metal bat. Add in his psychometry powers, he can tell an object's history by touching it, and you have a very fascinating character. I really enjoyed this book was surprised at all the twists and turns as the murder investigation unfolded. The interaction between Simon and his girlfriend, Jane was highly entertaining. The side characters delivered as well, plus this book had crazy mythology, butt kicking, romance, and during the finale, the most unique use of a Ghostbusters lunch box ever. For a fun urban fantasy romp, take a dip into Dead Waters, just watch out for the floating zombies . . . they'll bite your ankles off. Paul Genesse Editor The Crimson Pact anthology
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Qwillery More than 1 year ago
Dead Waters is the 4th book in the Simon Canderous series and the very best of the series so far. Simon is a psychometrist. He can read the history of an object by touching it. In Dead Waters, Simon is still somewhat impulsive and reckless but he is maturing. He still makes his trademark wise-cracks, but he is growing emotionally as he must deal with some personal issues. I always find that Simon's heart is in the right place... despite the various creatures that want to remove it. Simon is a very likable protagonist. I adore the supporting characters in this series: Jane Clayton-Forrester (Simon's technomancer girlfriend), Connor Christos (Simon's partner), Inspectre Argyle Quimbley (Simon's and Connor's boss), and Godfrey Candella (the D.E.A. Archivist). While Simon is the main character, the book really feels like an ensemble piece. I love the back and forth between the characters. There is genuine camaraderie. Simon, Jane, and Connor must solve the mystery surrounding a university professor's unusual death. The murder deeply affects Inspectre Quimbley as he used to know the professor well. The storyline dealing the aging Inspectre is very well done. I really enjoyed learning more about his past. Anton Strout deftly continues to lampoon bureaucratic red tape with New York City's Department of Extraordinary Affairs. I find the inner workings of the D.E.A. both fascinating and amusing. While the D.E.A. is facing severe budget cuts, fortunately none of my favorite characters lose their jobs. New York City is a great backdrop for this series. Dead Waters borrows from mythology in an inventive way. I won't reveal which mythology or what was borrowed as it would be a major spoiler. This is the darkest of the four books. I cried at one part of the story though there are far more moments that brought laughter. The pacing is excellent with a lot of action. The plot is really engaging. The mystery and its conclusion are handled beautifully. Dead Waters is a tasty melange of murder, mystery, and mythology, with a dash of mayhem thrown in for good measure.
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