ISBN-10:
0819191418
ISBN-13:
9780819191410
Pub. Date:
10/04/1993
Publisher:
UPA
A Dog's Life

A Dog's Life

Paperback

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Overview

In 1979, Hans Bayer sat down at a typewriter to compose his memoirs. A noncom in the German Army in World War II, Bayer had served in the Hitler's Body Guards division. For a number of reasons, among them guilt at having been caught up in Nazi fanaticism, Bayer wanted to record some of the key details of his past, especially his experiences in the Hitler Youth and later in the inferno of the war. Miller and Toothman have translated this story of one young German's experience in a world holocaust, hoping that this book in some way will help to ensure that such horrors will never occur again.

Author Biography: Hans Bayer is a printer in Nuremborg, Germany. Ray Miller is Adjunct Professor at the University of Delaware. John Toothman is Associate Professor at Goldey Beacom College.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780819191410
Publisher: UPA
Publication date: 10/04/1993
Pages: 180
Product dimensions: 5.80(w) x 9.02(h) x 0.39(d)

About the Author

Hans Bayer is a printer in Nuremborg, Germany. Ray Miller is Adjunct Professor at the University of Delaware. John Toothman is Associate Professor at Goldey Beacom College.

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A Dog's Life 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Bayer was a Sudentan German (Czechoslovakia). He tells of his up bringing and the psychological distance between the Germans and Czechs. He was inducted into the SS 1st panzer division. Bayer says that most of his classmates were inducted into the SS. They were told that they would get a college education after the war, et cetera. He was in many of the major battles, but he never had the SS tattoo. He would be doing duty, trainning or seeing a dentist whenever the tattoos were being done. He was very thankful that he didn't have the 'mark of Cain' on him, when he was captured by the Russians in Prague. He tells of the horrors of pay back by the Czechs. In spite of this, and his bitterness about how Nazis ended up in positions in West Germany, Bayer is funny and tells a human story of a horrible time. It seems inappropiate, but I found myself smiling and crying, as he told how he saw his school teacher at the post office. Bayer was in his SS uniform and he automatically bowed in respect. The teacher, a Jew, ran away and Bayer followed him. His teacher told Bayer to never speak to him again, because Bayer would be killed. Bayer tells how he had to load ships in Poland, while on a starvation diet. A Finnish crew took him aside and fed him fish head soup. Little things like that kept him alive.