Ram Dass: Fierce Grace

Ram Dass: Fierce Grace

Director: Mickey Lemle Cast: Ram Dass

DVD (Wide Screen)

Overview

Once a symbol of '60s counterculture and psychedelic drug use, Ram Dass has since become a renowned speaker and author on the topics of aging, spirituality, and overcoming the mistakes of the past. This documentary chronicles his journey from his affiliations with LSD advocate Timothy Leary to his endeavor to continue remaking himself after his stroke in 1997.

Product Details

Release Date: 04/15/2003
UPC: 0795975103435
Original Release: 2002
Rating: NR
Source: Zeitgeist Films
Region Code: 1
Presentation: [Wide Screen]
Time: 1:33:00

Special Features

20 minutes of exclusive additional footage; Chant master Krishna Das' prayer "Hanuman Puja." accompanied by a photo montage of Maharaj ji; "Hanuman Puja" lyrics in Sanskrit and English; Biographies of Ram Dass and producer/director Mickey Lemle; Personal statement from Mikey Lemle

Cast & Crew

Scene Index

Side #1 --
1. Night of the Stroke [4:12]
2. Speech Therapy [2:58]
3. Aqua Therapy [4:55]
4. Rachel [6:48]
5. A Worthy Adversary [3:31]
6. The Alpert Family [4:09]
7. Psychedelics at Harvard [7:43]
8. After Harvard: Millbrook [4:40]
9. Maharaj ji [12:45]
10. Ram Dass Returns From India [7:25]
11. Be Here Now [6:58]
12. Acupuncture [6:20]
13. Still Here [6:50]
14. Abby: The Death of a Lover Is a Path [11:19]
15. Closing Credits [3:03]

Customer Reviews

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Ram Dass: Fierce Grace 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I saw this film last night at the Cathedral of Assumption in downtown Louisville. My wife and I had been invited by our good friend, a newspaper publisher. I went into this film knowing literally nothing about Mickey Lemle nor Ram Dass. Upon leaving, I was overwhelmed by the film that I had just viewed. First, this is strong documentary filmmaking and tremendous story-telling on Lemle's behalf. The way the film is cut and the clips he chose for final use, were perfect. Material-wise, I was relieved to learn that Rass didn't appear to be a Messiah, but instead, a spiritual leader upon this earth, who listens who-heartedly to others. Too, the emphasis on him as an old man, the victim of a stroke, and the lengthy shots of Rass being loaded/unloaded out of his car, were nothing but effective. The neo-comedy of Rass and the gathering of souls on a golf-course are whitty, unexpected, and mostly hilarious. But good hilarious. The way his father, a simple man, thought his son strange, yet whole-heartedly loved him was powerful. What I liked about this film was that the present cinematography juxtaposed with the 60's and (even earlier!) cinematography, matched up perfectly. I couldn't believe the quality of the early Rass film, the choice of angles: the cinematography alone makes this film almost-cinematic and could be compared to a Soderbergh 35mm film. Lemle is an outstanding visionary. Nearing the end of the film, Abby enters the picture. A beautiful and refreshing and even tasteful choice by Lemle and Rass. All in all, I've never seen a film like this and it deserves many awards, even the Academy. It is one of the most unique films you'll ever see; it's captivating, pulls you in, at times beautiful, at times funny as hell, and certainly sad as hell at times. By far, one of the most extraordinary filmmaking experiences you'll ever see. Even if you care not a damn about the subject material, you'll leave a fan not only of Rass, but of Lemle and the pure art, beauty and joy of documentary filmmaking. Breathtakingly powerful.
Guest More than 1 year ago
NOT ONLY DOES HE SHARE HIS STROKE AND LIFE WITH US IN A MANNER TO SHOW ALL THE WORLD WHAT STROKE IS AND CAN DO, HE HELPS THOSE OF US ALSO TAKING THE ''STROKE'' JOURNEY IN MANY WAYS. ITS POWERFUL, ENTERTAINING, AND VERY EDUCATIONAL. ALSO COVERED HIS LIFE BIO IN A COOL WAY.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago