Falling Cloudberries: A World of Family Recipes

Falling Cloudberries: A World of Family Recipes

by Tessa Kiros, Lucy Broadhurst

Hardcover

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Overview

The New York Times calls Tessa Kiros's work "exuberant and colorful." And that is just what her gem, Falling Cloudberries: A World of Family Recipes, is. The book is full of personal touches and stories. It is a beautiful collection of family anecdotes, history, and traditions all documented with stunning photography, unique illustrations, and a warm dialogue that will simply pull you in.

Kiros's Apples for Jam, was called "a lovely quilt snuggled softly against your cheek" by the Times Herald-Record of Hudson Valley, New York.

You'll find Falling Cloudberries in the Cookbook section, but it could also easily be found in the World Cultures or Travel sections because the recipe collections give a unique taste of Finland, Greece, Cyprus, South Africa, and Italy all in one.

This is possible because of Kiros's life. She takes us on a global journey of taste and experience with her eclectic compilation of 170 simple and delicious recipes that reflect her world travels, multicultural heritage, family traditions, and amazing cooking combinations.

Taste the world without leaving your kitchen.

* Destination: delicious. Kiros inspires home cooks with a broad offering of dishes from Finland, Greece, Cyprus, South Africa, and Italy.

* Recipes are organized by country and are complemented with 185 four-color photographs and gorgeous illustrations. A handy index makes it easy to find specific foods and recipes.

* The book even has a lovely illustration of the author's family tree, which gives home cooks an inside look at the author's diverse and world-spanning family and their food traditions.

* The bold packaging and robust photography are just as inviting as Tessa's tasty dishes.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780740781520
Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing
Publication date: 03/24/2009
Pages: 400
Sales rank: 1,118,678
Product dimensions: 7.00(w) x 9.60(h) x 1.60(d)

About the Author

No one captures the spirit and soul of a place quite like Tessa Kiros. She was born in London, to a Finnish mother and a Greek-Cypriot father. The family moved to South Africa when she was 4, and at the age of 18 Tessa set off to travel and learn all she could about the world’s cultures and traditions, and new ways of living and eating. She has cooked at London’s The Groucho Club and in Sydney, Athens, and Mexico. On a trip to Italy to study the language and food, she met her husband, Giovanni. They now live in Tuscany, with their two children.

Customer Reviews

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Falling Cloudberries: A World of Family Recipes 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Christine_Emming More than 1 year ago
Jealous of Kiros' diverse family recipes and map-skipping travels, I read "Falling Cloudberries" from cover to cover, bookmarking tasty bites with flavors that span the globe. I was inspired to cook something immediately, but choosing a recipe proved difficult. My sweet tooth argued for dessert. But would it be the crumbly crisp Cinnamon and Cardamom Buns from Finland? Bougatsa from Greece, layered filo with sweet, custard-like filling? Cream cheese-filled Bourekia cookies from Cyrpus? In the end, Kiros' grandfather's Rice Pudding recipe (page 192), a mildly sweet and comforting dish, was the perfect footnote for the dinner I'd already eaten. Part memoir, part family scrapbook and entirely food-driven, this is the cookbook I wish I had written. Reading it feels familial, infused with childhood and nostalgia. Finished with my initial reading, I flipped through the book a second time to make my grocery list. The book already looked like a member of my (admittedly large) cooking library, torn paper scraps marking favored items and desserts with my notes for accompaniments. It being April, I'm baking up the South African cinnamon-swirled Bobba's Babka (page 246) for Easter brunch. Hopefully my family will love the recipe as much as I do. Served with a bit of nostalgia, this recipe collection provides a great balance of flavors with an approachable, continental flair. When this book arrived in the mail, I celebrated. There's a beautiful heft to the book - brimming with gorgeous patterns, color photography and thick, glossy pages - that makes it seem a prize, worthy of celebration and, perhaps, a bit more of that lovely rice pudding.
verybzymom on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I also have Apples for Jam by the same author, both books are beautiful. Just reading both books inspires me to get busy cooking. They are so gorgeous I hate to ruin them in the kitchen but the recipes are tempting. Apples for Jam is a bit stained but that's the sign of a good cookbook, at least in my house. Both books have little stickies notes on the pages with recipes I want to try. I enjoy the history she gives before the recipes and the wonderful photos, not just of food but of the places she has visited. This is a delightful book not just for cooks but for those who love to travel and enjoy different foods when they travel. If by Grandma, who loved to travel and experience new things, had written a cookbook it might have looked like this one.
grheault on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Beautiful cookbook, luscious pictures, wanders from Finland to Greece -- the gift of a friend who calls it her favorite cookbook.
comato on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is really beautiful, with a great cover and nice big pictures throughout. (It has the weight and shape of a novel, not of a cookbook that you'd be able to leave open on a counter and read from--style definitely won out over practicality here) I have to admit that the recipes in the beginning weren't that engaging to me, a lot of meat and potatoes, so I found myself skimming quite a bit until I got to the Italy section and the 'suitcase of recipes' section, both of which had many recipes that piqued my interest (and matched my palate better). If your comfort food is hearty, bone-sticking meals built around cream and starch, you'll find a lot to like in the beginning of the book. :) I thought the desserts were great throughout, and appreciated the variety and number of recipes included (too often, I think their inclusion is an afterthought in cookbooks). Overall, a beautiful book to page through with the author's story nicely tying together the disparate cuisines.
EMYeak on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I received my copy of this book in the Library Things Early Reviewer Program. My immediate reaction upon opening my package was: ¿Wow, this is a beautiful book with beautiful pictures.¿ I was thrilled. However, I quickly had a couple of other observations. It is a heavy book which is not quite so nice when holding it to read and I didn¿t care for the layout for use as a cookbook. The design is not the most practical for the use of the reader who actually wants to cook from the book.For each recipe, ingredients are listed first, then the name of the recipe, then a personal blurb about the recipe or the food. Directions for the recipe are given last and in smaller print then the personal blurb which make them harder to read while cooking. However, the directions are very thorough and go over to a second page in some cases. It would have been better if the second page was always a facing page but some of them finish after turning the page. Quite a few of the foods have pictures of the finished product. Serving suggestions and variations are frequently given. I like that Kiros also encourages the cook to add a little more or a little less of some ingredients depending on personal taste.There are many pictures. In addition to pictures of the food, some are of family members and some are scenic. Family members are identified, but the scenic pictures do not have any caption. I would have liked added information for those. The contents are:Food from Many KitchensFamily TreeFalling Cloudberries - FinlandOregano, Oranges, and Olive Groves - GreeceCinnamon and Roses - CyprusMonkeys¿ Weddings - South AfricaWashing Lines and Wishing Wells - ItalySuitcase of Recipes - WorldIndexI have marked several recipes that I hope to try:Pork Schnitzels - FinlandHasselback Potatoes - FinlandChickpea, Feta, and Cilantro Salad - GreeceBaked Lima Beans with Onions, Tomatoes, and Parsley - GreeceKourapiedes - GreecePita Bread - CyprusGreek-Cypriot Salad - CyprusKamut Bread - South AfricaApple Cake with Toffee Topping - South AfricaRicotta Tart with a Chocolate Crust - ItalyI have tried the Cinnamon and Cardamom Buns from the Finland chapter. They were delicious. I am quite pleased to have won this book and be able to add it to my library. It is a wonderful book to browse and I do hope to try some of the other recipes I have listed. Kiros has written a very nice book. My only wish would be for a more user friendly layout.
scrappycat on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
You know the saying "don't judge a book by it's cover"? That definitely does not apply in this case. First of all, it's gorgeous. I took the dust jacket off to keep from tearing it while reading, and was delighted to see that the inside matched the dust jacket. No, plain gray or brown. The inside is every bit as beautiful from the blue flowered design on the flyleaf, to the pictures of recipes and life. I say recipes and life, because that's what this book is, it's cookbook and a memoir all in one. The author of the book, Tessa Kiros, opens the book with the following quote, "These are the recipe I grew up with: the recipes that have woven their way through the neighborhoods of my mind, past indifference and into love. Those that have stayed while others might have fluttered away with a gentle spring breeze." What a growing up she did, she was born in London to a Finnish mother and a Greek-Cypriot father. When she was four, they moved to South Africa, and she now lives in Italy with her husband, Giovanni. Wow. Kind of makes my - born in Illinois, grew up in Missouri, and moved to Tennessee, seem kind of lame. So, it is with that rich background of cultures and influences that she puts together this collection of recipes and stories. And quite a collection it is. She begins with Finland - from her mother and her mother's side of the family, then to Greece and Cyprus - for her father, South Africa - from her upbringing, Italy - where she currently resides with her husband, and a section called suitcase - a lovely collection gathered along the way.I started out listing all of the recipes that I wanted to try (but they soon became too numerous, this book is 397 pages, after all). A very shortened version of my list:Finland - Potato Pancakes, Salmon Dill and Potato Soup, Cranberry JamGreece - Dolmades, Skordalia, Lemon and Oregano ChickenCyprus - Fried Haloumi Cheese, Green Olives with Coriander SeedsSouth Africa - Lemon Vanilla JamItaly - Olive Oil Bread, Pasta with Sardines and Wild FennelSuitcase - Caramel Ice Cream, Milk Honey and Cinnamon Ice CreamI can't begin to say enough nice things about this book. I absolutely loved it. It's big, gorgeous, filled with delicious sounding recipes, gorgeous photos, and a sweet family history.
landerman on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I received this as part of the Early Reviewers program last winter--and was super-excited to sit down and look it over. Like many reviewers here, I agree that the book is beautiful. The images are lush and inspiring. And I love that it includes cuisines that are so often overlooked by other cookbooks.I also deeply appreciate the detailed level of instruction in the recipes. In the marinated herrings recipe (p. 21), there are directions on how to go about filleting a herring. What a great inclusion for those of us who don't just know such things (or haven't already learned it from another cookbook!)On the other hand, some instructions are less-than-clear. Again in the marinated herrings recipe (p. 21), she calls for "4 (2 1/4 lb) lightly smoked salted herrings. I'm a fishetarian, I guess, because I cook vegetarian but eat fish out at restaurants. So I have no idea what the average size of a herring might be. And this wording doesn't help. Does she mean 4 herrings for a total of 2 1/4 lbs or should each herring weigh 2 1/4 lbs?And at the end of the day, the book fails me because it has yet to work its way into the regular rotation of cookbooks. I've flagged a couple to try (but have been put off by either the vast quantities of butter, heavy cream, and oil involved or the length of time involved--which is surprising considering I'm known for spending entire weekends happily cooking!) and have made just one (a potato salad I enjoyed but not so much that it would replace others in my repertoire). It's almost too pretty to be useful as a COOK book, yet there's not quite enough narrative to make me read it like a coffee table book (I'd say Marcella Cucina does more on that score.) Nevertheless, I'll keep it and hope to use it if for no other reason than the inclusion of cuisines otherwise missing from my "international" cookbooks.
cemming on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Jealous of Kiros' diverse family recipes and map-skipping travels, I read "Falling Cloudberries" from cover to cover, bookmarking tasty bites with flavors that span the globe. I was inspired to cook something immediately, but choosing a recipe proved difficult. My sweet tooth argued for dessert. But would it be the crumbly crisp Cinnamon and Cardamom Buns from Finland? Bougatsa from Greece, layered filo with sweet, custard-like filling? Cream cheese-filled Bourekia cookies from Cyrpus? In the end, Kiros' grandfather's Rice Pudding recipe (page 192), a mildly sweet and comforting dish, was the perfect footnote for the dinner I'd already eaten. Part memoir, part family scrapbook and entirely food-driven, this is the cookbook I wish I had written. Reading it feels familial, infused with childhood and nostalgia. Finished with my initial reading, I flipped through the book a second time to make my grocery list. The book already looked like a member of my (admittedly large) cooking library, torn paper scraps marking favored items and desserts with my notes for accompaniments. It being April, I'm baking up the South African cinnamon-swirled Bobba's Babka (page 246) for Easter brunch. Hopefully my family will love the recipe as much as I do.Served with a bit of nostalgia, this recipe collection provides a great balance of flavors with an approachable, continental flair. When this book arrived in the mail, I celebrated. There's a beautiful heft to the book ¿ brimming with gorgeous patterns, color photography and thick, glossy pages ¿ that makes it seem a prize, certainly worthy of celebration and, perhaps, a bit more of that lovely rice pudding.
nolagrl on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
First, the good. The premise of collecting recipes from the various cultures that have made Tessa Kiros who she is does bring some fresh and unusual recipes into the collection (I can honestly say I don't have other Finnish recipes so readily accessible). The photography is incredible, the production values and book design are outstanding, and Kiros' reminiscences of her family are somewhat -- somewhat -- engaging.And yet not so engaging that I was as drawn in and enraptured as I expected to be, given the lush look and layout. I never felt compelled to keep reading, never felt wholly connected to the author or her stories, didn't mark recipes as "must try" (and my seven full shelves of cookbooks are stuffed with books that are dog-eared and bookmarked, so I am a marker of such). I didn't learn as much about the cultures as I had expected to, and once past the (again) gorgeous photography, didn't feel that I was given enough to make this cookbook the one I would reach for rather than Vefa's Kitchen, or Diana Kennedy's In My Mexican Kitchen, or any Julia, or my Time-Life international series or even an old copy of Sheila Lukins' "All Around the World." I'm sure that if I were on an exhaustive recipe search through all of my cookbooks for an interesting potato dish, this one might make one or two rounds of the cut, and if I were to show someone "this is how to photograph food," I'd reach for it first. But overall, I wound up feeling disappointed and even a bit let down.(One quibbliest of quibbles from someone who has done her share of publication look-and-feel along with page and layout design: I would have chosen a different typeface for the actual recipes, or at least a different case and weight. The all-caps Times-ish serif face is deeply unattractive and cluttery.)
snash on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Recipes from the diverse cultures of Finland, Greece, Cyprus, South Africa, and Italy are each given a full chapter with 20 some recipes. It allows for diversity and depth all in one book. The book is further enriched by fabulous photographs of food, scenery, and people along with stories of the family and friends who inspired the recipes. I'm looking forward to trying a slew of them.
aviddiva on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Falling Cloudberries is beautiful, engaging, and filled with the kind of recipes that call to you from the pages, saying, don't be shy, this is home cooking, anyone can make this, and you can, too. More than a cookbook, but less than a memoir, Falling Cloudberries is a commonplace book, a collection of recipes, memories and photographs of food, families, and places the author has lived. It is designed to look like a scrapbook, with lovely chintz endpapers and spine, and a script font for the title and section headings. The wonderful thing about this cookbook is that, like any good scrapbook, the whole is so much more than the sum of its parts. The recipes, while interesting, are generally not complex; they are mostly common foods from the countries Tessa Kiros has lived. For me that is part of their appeal. I attend a yearly Greek festival each year. I love going for many reasons, but the best part is the food. I opened Falling Cloudberries at random, and there they all were, my Greek favorites: Lamb with lemon and oregano, pastitsia, fried haloumi cheese, loukoumades. In the South African section there is a recipe for garlic bread tucked in among more exotic offerings. There are less familiar recipes, too, including a number of enticing desserts, but this is mostly comfort food from Scandinavia, Greece, South Africa, and other places Tessa Kiros has lived. The vignettes that go along with these recipes are small, evocative passages, sensuous memories that recall a taste, a smell, the family member who shaped the dough or seasoned the chicken, the sight of octopus drying on a clothesline, the sad music from the ice-cream van.The photographs are really what make me keep coming back to this book . They are not just perfectly presented plates of finished dishes and stunning landscapes, nor are they how-to photos. Not every recipe has a photo, and not all the photos are of the food. They are large, full colored, abundant, and like the writing, evocative-- I could almost taste the black-eyed peas swimming in their glistening puddles of olive oil, or feel the heat radiating off the wall of a Greek church. The sepia-toned photos of Kiros's family look like interesting people I wish I'd known and been able to share a meal with. Overall, this is a lovely book to look through, to open at random and taste, and to be inspired by when looking for something new to cook . The recipes I've tried have been easy to follow and were eaten with great appreciation by my family. My only complaint is that the type used for the actual recipe directions is so much smaller than anything else in the book that it can be a bit difficult to read. In spite of that, I wholeheartedly recommend Falling Cloudberries as a memorable addition to your cookbook library.
tara35 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Tessa Kiros sure knows how to put together a beautiful book! I have enjoyed her book Apples for Jam but think this one is even better. The chapters in the book are arranged by location, all places that have had a special place in Kiros' heart. The chapters on Greece and Cyprus are my particular favorites.I have flagged countless recipes in this book to try. From Pastitsio and Moussaka to chickpea salad and Finnish meatballs, there is something here for everyone.This is more than just a cookbook, but one of those special books that you can curl up in bed with. Highly recommended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
skull More than 1 year ago
I absolutely LOVE all of Tessa Kiros' books. They are beautifully illustrated personal cooking memoirs, loaded with tasty recipes, gorgeous photos and family history. I recommend them frequently for cooks and cookbook lovers.