Forever Friday: A Novel

Forever Friday: A Novel

by Timothy Lewis

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Overview

Every Friday, a postcard.
Every Friday, a love poem.
Every Friday for sixty years.
 
Adam Colby is just doing his job, sorting through the unsold Alexander belongings after the estate sale. He is unprepared for what he finds in an old photo album, overlooked by the bargain hounds and treasure hunters—six decades of postcards and poems from Gabe Alexander to his wife, Pearl. The mystery of the Alexanders’ love entices Adam, a man unhinged by divorce and puzzled by the depth of commitment that he finds in the unabashedly romantic cards.
 
Forever Friday invites you to travel back in time to the early twentieth century Texas Coastal Bend where a young couple—Gabe and Pearl Alexander—are swept up in a miraculous love. As the heartwarming, pulse-quickening story of their relationship develops through Gabe’s poems, the Alexanders reveal a new way to consider what it means to be truly devoted to each other. Could the secrets of their love affair, laid to rest twenty years ago, hold the key to one man’s future?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780307732217
Publisher: The Crown Publishing Group
Publication date: 09/03/2013
Pages: 288
Sales rank: 1,163,865
Product dimensions: 5.78(w) x 8.02(h) x 0.77(d)

About the Author

TIMOTHY LEWIS is an author and playwright. He has authored more than twenty plays/musicals. In addition, he teaches a beginning novel writing class at West Texas A&M University and co-directs a summer writing academy. Timothy is also a professional speaker, cowboy poet, actor, and songwriter. He drew inspiration for Forever Friday from the postcards sent between his great-aunt and great-uncle over a period of sixty years. He lives with his wife near Amarillo, Texas.

Read an Excerpt

Forever Friday

A Novel


By Timothy Lewis

Crown Religion/Business/Forum

Copyright © 2013 Timothy Lewis
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-307-73221-7


Prologue

Summer 2006
Adam Colby

Some great romances worth the telling are never told, their lovers slipping silently between life’s timeworn cracks only to be pitched with yesterday’s trash. As owner of a small estate-sale business, I’d witnessed evidence over the years of various couples’ love lives. So I’d learned to sift through the piles of forgotten memories. Learned to appreciate a second look…and perhaps ease my pain.

That was how I discovered the postcards.

Bargain hounds and treasure hunters pushed through the heavy front door of Gabe and Pearl Alexander’s beloved home early before rushing away to their next classified find. Antique buyers, who were more savvy, missed the cards because they were camouflaged among several dozen identical photo albums. Inside their vinyl maroon covers, these albums held not the usual faded family snapshots, but hundreds of colorful postcards revealing six decades of married passion recorded in rhyme beside canceled postage stamps.

Surprised to find postcard poems instead of photos, I began reading them in between my dealings with customers. As a thirty-eight-year-old man who had once committed to “forever,” I was intrigued. What was this couple’s secret? In a fast-food world of abbreviated relationships, what supernatural love potion kept Gabe and Pearl enamored with each other for more than half a century?

So I continued reading through lunch and into the sale’s afternoon lull. I’m not sure I believed in love anymore, especially married love, but found myself becoming more entranced as each minute passed. Even though the Alexanders had lived together in the same house, the postcards were sent over the years from Gabe to Pearl, beginning in 1926. Each unique card was signed “Forever, Gabe,” the poem connecting an episode of their love to the picture on the front.

My guess was Gabe died in the mid-1980s, because that’s when the cards stopped.

One of the earliest cards was dated September 4, 1927. On the front was a picture of two colorful seashells. On the back, this poem:

Two tiny shells, together side by side
Wandering to and fro about the morning tide.
Two tiny shells, now picked up by a man
Who sets them out to dry upon the glistening
     sand.
Two tiny shells, how delicate, how proud
To be created by the One whose throne’s above
     the clouds.
And these two tiny shells are sent to you
     by me
Because I know you understand God’s wonders
     by the sea.

Forever, Gabe

I was curious if he’d mailed Pearl two actual seashells along with the postcard and, if so, what had happened to them. Surely she’d have treasured them, but the only seashells in their belongings were large and obviously store-bought. The ocean must have played a significant role in their marriage because there were several cards with sailboats and beach scenes, and with Galveston so close by.

“What kind of man invests this much time in his marriage?” I said aloud, feeling a little betrayed by a guy I’d never met. Love wasn’t a competition, but Gabe had left me floundering in the dust, and most other men as well. Men who loved their wives, or said they did, even though many times their actions proved otherwise.

At least I wasn’t a hypocrite.

Or was I?

Just before the sale ended, a customer declared himself the Alexanders’ next-door neighbor, so I discreetly asked about their interest in the sea.

“Wouldn’t know,” he said, then shrugged. “Gabe died shortly after I bought my place. Pearl would speak to me from across the yard, but she wasn’t keen on in-depth conversations.”

“Why?”

“Valued her privacy, I guess.” He shrugged again. “Spent the last year of her life confused and in an extended-care facility.”

“Can you tell me anything else?” I asked.

“Pearl had an unusual nickname.”

“Nickname?”

“Yeah, like a man’s, but I can’t remember it.” The neighbor paused. “Do you know what happened to their car? A big 1940s model Oldsmobile. Mint condition.”

I shook my head, wondering if the postcards contained Pearl’s nickname.

“The old gal probably needed the money and sold it,” the man continued. “Shame. I’d have bought it.” He rubbed his chin. “Any tools left?”

“Out in the garage,” I replied.

“The Alexanders were nice folks,” the man added before walking away. “Too bad you never met them.”

The neighbor was correct. I’d never met them, but had heard from the attorney who hired me that they had no children and were donating the bulk of their estate to charity. However, their will included detailed instructions that certain sentimental items be delivered to various relatives still living in the Houston, Texas, area. I usually contracted that job to a moving company, but since the Alexanders’ home was only a few miles from mine, and the items were small, I elected to deliver them myself. After reading the postcards, I felt strangely invested in Gabe and Pearl and was more than happy to oblige.

Over the next few weeks I made deliveries and asked questions. Some thought it odd that a total stranger would take such an interest in their kin. Others spilled all they knew to me, even digging up yellowed newsy letters. I selfishly decided not to mention the postcard albums unless someone asked about them, and no one did. So I concluded they were kept secret. In some ways, it even seemed the postcards had been written for me. But I couldn’t keep them, not in good conscience anyway. At the end of my quest, I’d take them to an Alexander relative as “accidentally overlooked.”

Gabe’s typewriter went to their niece, Alice Davis. Alice recently had knee replacement surgery and was, in her words, “convalescing nicely.” I spent a rainy afternoon wrapped up in her thoughtful recollections. She also told me about the Alexanders’ deceased longtime housekeeper, Priscilla Galloway, whose daughter, Yevette, looked after Pearl during that final year. I contacted Yevette and scheduled an appointment to meet with her the following week.

I suppose my obsession with the postcards was as much a matter of timing as anything. The stinging loneliness of my divorce still lingered, the blunt ache of a failed marriage. As I sent a confirmation e-mail to a somewhat reluctant Yevette, my eyes settled on a folder I’d saved with messages from my ex-wife. I opened it and clicked on her final e-mail. Even though it was dated approximately two years prior, devastation washed over me as though I were reading it for the first time.

Adam,

Today we’re officially over. Thanks for respecting my wishes.
If you’re still hoping I’ ll change my mind, don’t. I need my
own life. You need to move on. So please, no more questions.
When did I stop loving you? I’m not sure. Is there
someone else? Yes. That’s why I didn’t contest the house. I
never intended to hurt you.

Haley


The words “someone else” were, unsurprisingly, still the most painful.

Someone else?

In twelve years of marriage we’d had our share of difficulties, but hadn’t everyone? I had never doubted our love, nor envisioned a life without her. Other than what couldn’t have been helped, where had we gone wrong? What could we have done to prevent disaster?
(Continues...)

Excerpted from Forever Friday by Timothy Lewis. Copyright © 2013 Timothy Lewis. Excerpted by permission of Crown Religion/Business/Forum, a division of Random House, Inc.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Forever Friday: A Novel 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 30 reviews.
demiller More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book. Mr. Lewis did a great job telling the story of long term love!! Really worth reading!
Pickle331 More than 1 year ago
Forever Friday by Timothy Lewis is a love story--actually two love stories. The first is the story of Huck (Pearl) and Gabe Alexander, from their first chance meeting at the fish store Huck popped in to through their final day together. The second is Adam Colby's story of both a failed marriage and yet his hope for a second chance. The two stories intersect because of Adam's business as an estate salesman, when he finds six decades of postcards overlooked by antique buyers and treasure hunters.  As he reads the postcards, they raise questions--both questions about their life together as well as questions about gaps. How could Huck have fallen in love with Gabe and taken a chance on marrying him after knowing him for such a short time? What's the glue that held their relationship together? Adam meets with Yvette, a young woman whose mother worked for the Alexanders, and as they talk about the postcards and the Alexanders' relationship, Adam begins to have hope for a second chance at love. Each chapter begins with an original poem, sent on a postcard every Friday from Gabe to Huck. Each poem is not just a statement of love but holds within it the seeds of the truth that was the glue. Lewis skillfully blends both past and present in a story of love and hope. This book was provided free of charge from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group in exchange for reviewing it.
SheilaDeeth More than 1 year ago
What is the secret of a successful marriage? What is the “long division” that splits our time and divides us from our spouses? And how can two people keep romance alive? Forever Friday doesn’t really answer these questions, not in so many words, but it does present a charming portrait of an unlikely, but very happy marriage. It’s not a marriage devoid of conflict though, from first meeting (when the girl is already engaged to someone else) to the death that parts (just for a while). Huck (Pearl) and Gabe don’t always want the same things. They don’t always agree. They don’t always discuss their actions before causing each other hurt. But they stay together, they always make up, and Gabe keeps writing his postcards, one a week, to be delivered with love every Friday. If a postcard poem a week sounds impossible, it’s intriguing to learn this part of the tale’s based on fact. Meanwhile the other facts of this novel are equally well-researched and evocatively portrayed, as Texas towns, big oil, and everyday people grow and change through the twentieth century. I’ve never seen the beautiful orchid that forms a background icon to this tale, but I feel like I have, and I imagine myself seeking out its image now. In the foreground is a present day divorced estate agent, wondering if it’s too late for him to try again for romance. His story adds a nice counterpoint to Huck and Gabe’s mix of fate and angelic intervention. Not all great romances start with love at first sight. Not all are built on immediate commitments to honesty and communication. And not all coincidences are angelic intervention. But hope is real, and faith is the strength behind hope. And I really enjoyed this tale. Disclosure: I received this book for free from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group for this review
BrittanyMc More than 1 year ago
Forever Friday is a very unique way to tell a love story. The author sets the story up by introducing us to Adam, a man who does not know if it is possible for true love to last. He is disheartened by his wife leaving him two years earlier. After discovering a set of postcards with love poems on them that spanned sixty years of a couple’s marriage, Adam set out to learn the secret to this now deceased couple’s lasting romance. The first portion of the book moved a little slowly for me. However, after the initial introduction of the main characters and beginning situations in the book, things really took off. The story jumps back and forth between the present (2006), the recent past (2004) and the distant past (1926 – 1986). I did not feel this was confusing at all, as the author did a good job of beginning each historical chapter with one of the poem postcards and then going on to explain the situation that the postcard referenced. The main love story in the book, spanning sixty years, is the story of Gabe and Huck’s romance. It is truly a romance to take your breath away. The author did a great job of creating characters that touched my heart and I really enjoyed reading their love story. I admit that I would have liked more of a love story between Adam and Yvette, the young woman who was very close to Gabe and Huck and helped fill in the blanks for Adam. However, I understand that giving them a big love story would have detracted from the main romance. I think this story will stay in my mind for quite a while. Gabe and Huck discovered the way to keep romance alive for sixty years of marriage. Very sweet story. (4 stars) I received a complimentary copy of Forever Friday from WaterBrook Press in exchange for my honest review, which I have given.
Barca6 More than 1 year ago
Forever Friday by Timothy Lewis is a wonderfully written love story that chronicles the lives of Gabe and Huck for over sixty years. We should all be so lucky to have such love and total devotion as Gabe and Huck had for each other. If you enjoy reading Nicholas Sparks and Richard Paul Evans, you will enjoy this quick and easy read by Timothy Lewis.
Kellie4 More than 1 year ago
Forever Friday by Timothy Lewis was a wonderful read! I was pleasantly surprised at how the story and characters developed to make for a fun and unique read.  Huck, a newly engaged lady, has a chance meeting in the market with Gabe. They have an interchange, one that neither of them forget. Because of this, they look for each other in hopes that they will talk again. When they do finally meet again, several months later, it is like they have known each other their whole life, soul mates.  They marry, not without difficulties early on from the previous fiancé, and early on Gabe promises to send Huck a postcard every Friday with a poem. These postcards are found by Adam, an executor of their estate, who chooses to write their story. Along the way, he learns what it means to love for a lifetime, and how to love again.  This was a very fun, encouraging story, reminding us of how to make love last. 
KarinReads More than 1 year ago
The story opens with Adam Colby, an estate auctioneer, stumbling across photo albums filled with postcards. Every card was written by Gabe Alexander to his wife Huck. He sent her a postcard every Friday throughout their marriage. Adam is lured in by the postcards. Who were the Alexanders and why did they have a marriage of soul mates when his ended in divorce? Adam learns all that he can from the postcards but when that isn't enough he contacts friends of the childless couple. The Alexanders had purposed in their hearts that their marriage would never become "routine." They would not allow anything to take their focus off of each other, not children, jobs, friends. This book was an easy read. The chapters switched back and forth from Adam to the Alexanders. But, I have to admit that there was something missing in the book for me. Though the focus of the book was the Alexanders I felt that a depth of revelation was missing. The book didn't reveal the everyday struggles and trials that any marriage goes through. Only major issues were written about. My other issue was that I was under the assumption that this was a Christian book. I felt that God played a secondary role to their relationship.
SandrasBookNook More than 1 year ago
This book typifies why I am thinking about phasing out reviewing "Christian fiction". Putting the label "Christian fiction" on a book does not make it so. There's nothing "Christian" about this book. Smoking, drinking, immoral behavior, a so-called "guardian angel" while almost no talk of God Himself, much less anyone even TRYING to live a godly life makes for a very poor book indeed. The story line itself had some great promise, and there are some very sweet moments, but these are cheapened by the lack of any type of real Christianity, the selfishness of the two main characters--especially Huck--and a gratuitous attempted rape scene (which wouldn't have even happened if Huck had just been honest with her husband!). This is supposed to be a grand love story, but it falls very short. Huck and Gabe are so wrapped up in having a deep, loving, lasting marriage that is really becomes to the exclusion of all others. I also had an issue with the fact that their first "date", which was really all day and night, occurred while Huck was engaged to another man! If you're looking for a secular love story, this might work great for you. If you're looking for a Christian love story, I'd advise you to look elsewhere. I received a copy of this book from Waterbrook Press through "Blogging for Books" in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
millstreetreader More than 1 year ago
Warm and entertaining.  Timothy Lewis's first novel, Forever Friday, is a gentle, contemplative story similar in tone to the works of Nicholas Sparks or Richard Paul Evans.  As he sorts materials for yet another estate sale, Adam Colby stumbles upon a series of photo albums, filled not with treasured family photos, but hundreds of post cards, all written by Gabe Alexander to his wife Pearl.  When Adam learns that Gabe sent his wife a postcard with a new poem each and every Friday of their 60+ years of marriage, Adam wonders what kept this romance alive for decades when his own short marriage has ended in divorce. Where had he (and his wife) failed?  Adam sets out to learn more about this couple and their deep love, not an easy task since they have no children or close relatives.  When he locates the daughter of the couple's long time house keeper, Adam begins to learn more about the life of Gabe and Pearl. Despite the alternating modern day chapters and flashbacks to Gabe and Pearl's life, this book was a fast, entertaining read. I especially liked Pearl's spunk and the Texas oil country setting.  I am sure others will be warmed by this story.  I received a copy of this novel from Blogging for Books for my honest review.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wondefully written story of a timeless love. The combination of hearing the present as we are piecing the past together is intriguing and keeps me completely enthralled. I loved every second of this book. I know it will be one I read again and again.
Savurbks More than 1 year ago
Recently divorced, Adam Colby is hired to go through the belongings of Gabe and Pearl (aka Huck) Alexander. Surprised, he finds a collection of personal postcards in an old photo album dating back six decades which speak of true devotion. Through the Friday poems, much is learned about Gabe and Huck…their relationship, their soul-mate love, their unending devotion to each other as well as the many circumstances which tested all of these. “Two hearts commanding devotion”… A PENNY FOR MY THOUGHTS: Spanning decades between the postcards and the present day, Forever Friday linked two different time periods together by the timeless lesson of true love and devotion. Through postcards at the beginning of each chapter, flashbacks to Gabe and Huck’s relationship, and present day happenings, the author really was able to convey a strong message in his novel. Though not exactly what I was expecting, I found myself caught up in the story and the moments portrayed. I enjoyed the author’s writing style which kept the book moving forward to a final conclusion joining past and present. RATING: 4 (out of 5) pennies *I received a complimentary copy of Forever Friday from WaterBrook Press for my honest review*
HeathersStitches More than 1 year ago
I haven't done a Book review in some time, I'm not sure why as I Love to read a chapter or a few at night. I really liked this book. The Romance between Gabe and Pearl was so Sweet and reminded me of " The Notebook" which is probably why I just loved this book. It flipp- flopped between Gabe/Pearl's years in the past and then into Gabe's present. The story line was not hard to follow and I really enjoyed the ending with Gabe's choices. This book was sent to me for Review.
TGK1 More than 1 year ago
Forever Friday was a book I enjoyed reading.  Romances are not high on the list of topics I search through when looking for a book to enjoy, due to the possibility of romantic scenes.  In Forever Friday, the most risque scene was the kiss on a porch swing and the hints as to what followed.  No details or pages of long drawn out foreplay.   Timothy Lewis found the perfect balance between romance and tact.  True romance is what was in this book, not lust or unbridled passion.  It was a refreshing read and one I felt better for having read.  Each chapter starts with a poem and follows with the story associated with it.  Then end of the book contains questions that could be used for a group discussion or personal reflection. Huck, whose real name is Pearl, and Gabe came together through a series of unpredictable events.  From the first moment they met, it was like they knew each other.  Soul mates?  Kindred spirits?  Call it what you may, it was the beginning of a relationship that would grow through 60 years of marriage and  continue in love, even after death. Forever Friday is their story based upon postcards Gabe sent to Huck every Friday of their married life.  Each was unique and contained a poem he had written for her.  It was his way of creating many small links between them to keep their marriage strong and the two of them connected. Adam Colby is a man who doesn't know if true love exists or is something people just claim to have.  After a failed marriage,  he has been living life by going through the motions but not actually living.  When he comes across the photo album containing the post cards he is compelled to find the missing pieces and the answer to their lasting marriage.  In searching for the answer, he begins to look at his own life.  Did he have his soul mate and mess things up?  If she wasn't his soul mate, could he find someone to love like Gabe did Huck?  Is he worthy of such love? The story of Adam, toward the end, was pretty predictable and seemed rushed.  There weren't as many details and made it feel a bit "stuck on" to the Forever Friday story between Gabe and Huck.  I think the story would have been better without the blossoming romance between Adam and Yvette, having just left them as friends. Timothy Lewis tells of these two crossing paths as a true story is often told, skipping from one point in the past to another then back to the present.  It had the potential for a very confusing read.  Thanks to Lewis' great writing it flowed smoothly, with a plot you could to follow without getting lost. 
VictoryBelle More than 1 year ago
There’s so much I could say about “Forever Friday”, I’d almost tell you the entire story but then what’s the fun if you can’t read and enjoy it for yourself, right? Right!  If you’d you can view the Book Trailer and then read my review. Though I tend to enjoy the trailer myself after I’ve read a review. I get more hyped up about it. But that’s one persons glass of lemonade! Shall we begin? This book begins with Adam Colby. As he’s cleaning out a house for an estate sale he discovers an album filled with postcards signed by a Gabe Alexanders. Each with a love poem and stamp posted every Friday for sixty years. As he reads, he becomes more and more intrigued by the story between each postcard and poem with its gleaming passion and devotion.  “Two tiny  seashells, together side by side Wandering to and fro about the morning tide.  Two tiny seashells, now picked up by man Who sets them out ot dry upon the glistning sand. Two tiny shells, how delicate, how proud To be created by the One whose throne’s above the clouds. And these two tiny shells are sent to you by me Because I know you understand God’s wonders by the sea Forever, Gabe” Who was this Gabe Alexander? What did he know about love that Adam seemed to lack in his own lost marriage? Stung by the divorce from his wife of twelve years, Adam has been discouraged and is ready to give up on the hope of ever finding love again. Mystified by the Alexanders he begins his journey in trying to find the key to that “Forever.”  The beginning poem captivated me immediately, it was so lovely and touching. I couldn’t wait to read more of them. In the first few or so chapters when the time periods jump and point of views change, first to Mrs. Alexander in a nursing home then to a Yevette and then quickly back to where it all started. It took a couple jumps for me to get the swing of the in between time jumps and point of views but once you get a it, it actually enriches the overall story.  March 1926, that’s where the real story begins. Huck Huckabee has her first encounter with Gabe Alexander. From the moment she walks into the shop he knows there is something truly beautiful inside, like a pearl in an oyster shell. Now he can’t get her off his mind; Huck leaves and a month later his sea sky eyes still follow in her thoughts. I have to say, Gabe and Huck’s first chapter together over oysters was one of the most heart fluttering, charming, favorite moments for me. Instantly the characters came to life. Usually it takes a while to get used to characters but Huck and Gabe, it was like you’d known them your whole life! Yet there so much you still wanted to learn about them. I loved that about this book.  In a fleeting moment, Huck falls in love with Gabe as he does with her. Touching each others heart and soul. Upon their marriage Gabe begins with a promise to write and send Huck a postcard which she receives in the mail every Friday. Even though they live together and never spend more a working day apart, Huck waits excitedly for each one. What devotion. As the years continue there’s trying times, near death experiences, but the highlight of this story and what continued to bring tears to my eyes till the very end: Hope.  When Huck was ten years old she encountered stranger, possibly even a convict. But Huck believed him to be her guardian angel (as do I). And with each occurrence and unexplainable event just proved him to be real.  “Grab hope and never let it go.”  Through that hope, two people found each other; through hope their love not only last for six decades but grew and blossomed, maturing from that foundation and joining together as one. And though parted by death, their love still remained in each others hearts. “Tonight. Sweet mystery we explore. ... A timeless understanding.  Of how The Love Division’s foiled by more Than tender touch along love’s way,  But two hearts commanding  Devotion. ... On our first Forever Friday” Addicting as any Nicholas Sparks book; I personally believe this one succeeded NS’s! It’s now going into my timeless collection. I strongly recommend this book, even if your not a reader and say you have a friend or relative who is, I’d get it for them. It’s a phenomenal book. I hope Timothy Lewis writes more in the future. I’m definitely following this rising author.  WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group provided this book to me for free in exchange for my honest and unbiased review as part of their Blogging for Books program.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hope. One word that seems so lost in our modern lifestyles. One word that doesn’t have a meaning to most people in our decade. One word that is recovered when someone touches these pages. I bet most people, like myself, would only pick this up because of the beautiful cover. I had never heard of Timothy Lewis before and the book is not described as a bestseller….yet! If I could speak for a thousand people this book would have as many hits as The Diary of Anne Frank. I would like everyone to take a moment to watch the book trailer, then return for my review. Forever Friday Book Trailer Adam Colby, while cleaning out a house, finds six decades of postcards from a husband to his soulmate. As a man whos marriage just disolved and is unsure of how to carry on feels a connection to these postcards. He begins to make contacts and figure out their story. Gabe and Pearl “Huck” Alexander are the true definition of soulmates. The story starts out with Huck as a child, we learn about her family and her fiance whom she is uncertain about. “Your future,” Mister Jack said finally, “has to do with this here Anacacho orchiad bush. Fact is, this bush and your future is kin. Just as this bush shares itself with youngstrs like you, you will share yourself with your children.” pg 15 After meeting her guardian angel, Mister Jack, Huck begins a journey of closing one relationship to open a much grander love. Upon Gabe and Huck’s marriage, her husband begins sending a postcard with a poem every Friday. Although they live together and never spend more than a work day apart, Huck is always excited to read her Friday mail. There are trying times, near death experiences and unconditional love that keep them close to each other. Most of all, there is hope. With each frightening occurance the one will reach for hope and they once again are united. I loved this read, it was the perfect end to my week vacation. Nicholas Sparks better watch out because Timothy Lewis is going to run the romance world soon enough! This book has shown me how easy it is to lose the things that matter most when daily life gets tiresome and boring. It is the relationship that keeps you strong, the bond you share and the life you make. I cried for these characters, more than once, I inspire to be them as my marriage continues. “her in-love-ness was a knowing, a severely protected knowing undergirded by the gentleness shared between two soulmates. If felt safe, and it provided the freedom to communicate hidden fears and innermost desires without mock or rejection.” pg 95 I wish for everyone to pick this book up in the near future and enjoy the devotion of two people in a heartwarming, timeless love. I just wanted to let everyone know, this book was provided to me by Blogging for Books for review. I did recieve it for free and it was a pleasure to read and review it. I’m still choked up over the story, congratulations and thank you to Timothy Lewis for writing so beautifully.
busymomoftwo More than 1 year ago
hopeless romantic - This person is in love with love. They believe in fairy tales and love. Yes, I consider myself a hopeless romantic...I certainly love a good love story. Whether it is a book or a movie, there is just something so appealing to me about a good love story. When I read the synopsis of Forever Friday, by Timothy Lewis, I knew that I simply had to read it. "Every Friday, a Postcard. Every Friday, a Love Poem. Every Friday for Sixty Years." What a neat idea! Could you imagine? How romantic...not to just write a love poem, but to send it on a post card every Friday. The best part, the author drew inspiration for the story from the postcards sent between his great-aunt and great-uncle over a period of sixty years. The story is about Huck and Gabe Alexander. It is a story of how they met and how these soul mates found a love that led to these weekly postcards. It is told from the perspective of Adam Colby, the owner of a small estate-sale business, who came upon the postcard collection during the sale he was conducting of the Alexander's belongings. He pieces together their love story, through the post cards and conversations with Yvette, the daughter of their long time housekeeper. It is their story that he recounts in the book Forever Friday. The story is a great love story, set against sixty years of history, starting in the early twentieth century and ending in the summer of 2006. If you enjoy a good love story, I recommend this book. The author did a great job of developing the characters and telling their love story. Almost as soon as I started the book, I was hooked. I wanted to keep reading to learn more about their adventures. I must confess that I was a little surprised when I realized that it was a male author - I think that this could possibly be the first love story that I read by a man. Now, certainly, some of my favorite authors that are men have included love in their stories, but this book was a love story. The story struck me as one that could someday be made into a movie, one that if it were well done, I would really enjoy. A complimentary review copy was provided. All opinions are my own.
PlantsandPillars More than 1 year ago
This book was not what I expected. I was hoping for more history, mixed in with more quaint letter writing. I was rather disappointed, to tell the whole truth, but it was still cute. Sorting through the unsold belongings after the Alexander estate sale, Adam Colby is shocked to find a photo album filled with postcards and overflowing with a love story. Reeling from a recent divorce, Adam is struck with the apparent love that Gabe and Pearl had for each other... even after 60 years. Adam begins to hunt down clues and begins to understand what love is and what it means to be a couple devoted to each other. For better or worse. And while a dying Pearl waits for one last post card from Gabe - forgetting he's been gone for years - Adam traces the story and finds a love that will never die. I expected a more Christian theme to this book, and was rather disappointed. And I was expecting a little more resolution to Adam's life. But, overall, I'll give it 4 stars.
Heart2Heart More than 1 year ago
"Some great romances worth telling are never told, their lovers slipping silently between life's timeworn cracks only to be pitched with yesterday's trash. As owner of a small estate-sale business, I'd witnessed evidence over the years of various couple's love lives. So I'd learned to sift through the piles of forgotten memories. Learned to appreciate a second look...and perhaps ease my pain. That was how I discovered the postcards. Bargain hounds and treasure hunters pushed through the heavy front door of Gabe and Pearl Alexander's beloved home early before rushing away to their next classified find. Antique buyers, who were more savvy, missed the cards because they were camouflaged among several dozen identical photo albums. Inside their vinyl maroon covers, these albums held not the usual faded family snapshots, but hundreds of colorful postcards revealing six decades of married passion recorded in rhyme beside canceled postage stamps. Surprised to find postcards poems instead of photos, I began reading them in between my dealings with customers. As a thirty-eight-year-old man who had once committed to "forever," I was intrigued. What was this couple's secret? In a fast food world of abbreviated relationships, what supernatural love potion kept Gabe and Pearl enamored with each other for more than half a century? I'm not sure I believed in love anymore, especially married love, but found myself becoming more entranced as each minute passed. Even though the Alexanders had lived together in the same house, the postcards were sent over the years from Gabe to Pearl, beginning in 1926. Each unique card was signed "Forever, Gabe," the poem connecting an episode of their love to the picture on the front. My guess was Gabe died in the mid-1980's, because that's when the cards stopped." (pg. 1-2). Move over Nicholas Sparks!!! There is an incredible new author I can't wait for you to pick up his debut novel, Forever Friday. For those of you that love "The Notebook," then you will love this one without a doubt. I was completely captivated and mesmerized by this heartwarming love story that spans across sixty years of a man who vowed to do what he could to show the woman of his life, his wife, just how much he loved her by sending her postcards with a poem penned from his heart every single Friday til he died. Now Adam Colby, who happens upon the postcards tucked away in a photo album while going through an estate sale feels that he has stumbled across something more, perhaps the secret to making love and marriage last through the story he uncovers researching Gabe and Huck Alexander. I received Forever Friday by Timothy Lewis compliments of Waterbrook Multnomah Publishers for my honest review and received no monetary compensation for a favorable one. This book takes the readers back to the life of Gabe and Pearl, who you will learn loves to be called Huck instead, as they meet and spend sixty years of love together. You will learn the secret to defeating The Long Division that claims so many marriages today and how one man's undying love captivated not only Pearl's heart but also the reader's heart as well. I only hope this is the start to something wonderful with Timothy Lewis and I can't wait to see what comes next in his novels. By far, one of my favorite love stories this year and one that has a new-found permanent home in my personal library. Well worth every single one of the 5 out of 5 stars!!!! You won't want to miss this one!
Writer4God More than 1 year ago
Forever Friday by Timothy Lewis Every Friday, a postcard Every Friday, a love poem Every Friday for sixty years Adam Colby is just doing his job, sorting through the Alexander belongings remaining after the estate sale. He is unprepared for what he finds in an old photo album, overlooked by the bargain hounds and treasure hunters---six decades of postcards and poems from Gabe Alexander to his wife, Pearl. The mystery of the Alexanders' love entices Adam, a man unhinged by divorce and puzzled by the depth of commitment that he finds in the unabashedly romantic cards. Forever Friday invites you to travel back in time to the early twentieth century Texas Coastal Bend where a young couple---Gabe and Pearl Alexander---are swept up in a miraculous love. As the heartwarming, pulse-quickening story of their relationship develops through Gabe's poems, the Alexanders reveal a new way to consider what it means to be truly devoted to each other. Could the secrets of their love affair, laid to rest twenty years ago, hold the key to one man's future? This was an enjoyable read following Gabe and Pearl's (AKA Huck) relationship from the day they meet up until their deaths, showing first how they fall in love and then following their life after they're married, showing everything they go through during their marriage. It was a very sweet love story and I especially enjoyed the first half of it, though it was all good. A worthwhile read and one that I think most women would enjoy. I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for this honest review.
MelissaF More than 1 year ago
When I read the back cover of this book I was really excited to read it. It sounds Nicholas Sparks-like and used to enjoy Nicholas Sparks but I stopped reading him because of too many steamy love scenes. So I was hoping for something similar but cleaner. I hate to write about a book when I am disappointed but I need to be honest. I didn’t connect with this book at all. This is my opinion only and I am sure many other readers will love this book. Actually, this book as a lot of great reviews. I felt like I never got a chance to connect with any of the characters. There was a lot of hopping around and I couldn’t get a grasp on who the characters really were. There was a lot of narration in the beginning, just the character taking in the surrounds but not really moving the story forward. The dialogue that was there felt forced to me. Also, Huck (the heroine), gets so angry at one point she cuts some of her hair off in the middle of a restaurant. Even though I didn’t have a good grasp in her personality I still felt that was a bit impulsive. Like I said, I am sure many other people will like it, it just wasn't for me.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is a wonderful read. The story starts with Adam. He is divorced and trying to figure out what went  wrong in his marriage. He ends up finding a photo album of postcards at an estate sale that he is running.  He feels an attachment to the postcards, so he hides them so no one knows they are there and then reads through  them himself. He decides to contact someone that would know more about the couple who they belonged to. This story  is told in different viewpoints and timeframes. I enjoyed the change in time and point of view. I felt like I was part of the story  right from the beginning. Hank and Gabe truly were a love at first sight type of couple. They had found the way to keep a  marriage alive, and not get tempted by divorce. Switching from Gabe’s point of view to Hank’s viewpoint in the future was  a different way to tell the story. It kept me entertained and I believe that this story will definitely touch your heart.  "I received this book for free from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group for this review."
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Forever Friday is a novel by Timothy Lewis about the love shared between Gabe and Pearl Alexander.  It begins with a prologue written in the view of estate salesman, Adam Colby. While looking through the estate of the two lovers, Colby finds a photo album filled with postcards, all sent from Gabe Alexander to his wife, Pearl. Still reeling from his own divorce, Colby keeps the post cards so he can read through them and try to figure out if he can love again.  The story is told in different viewpoints, that of Pearl (or as she likes to be called, Huck) and Gabe Alexander and Adam Colby and in three different time eras. Making a connection with Huck is easy. She’s a take-charge, independent woman who knows what she wants and does everything in her power to get it. She lives life, doesn’t let life live her and Gabe is more than happy to go along with this journey as evidenced by their shopping trip on their first date. Huck smiled, remembering their first date and how he’d so easily convinced her to buy a new dress a Foley Brothers. Then moments later while she was in the dressing room, Gabe selected a pink sailor blouse that fit her perfectly. “I’ve seen a few husbands come in with their wives,” the young female clerk said as they stood at the cash register, “but they couldn’t wait to leave.” “I tried to,” Gabe whispered. “But I’m being held against my will under the spell of her beauty. Can you help me?” Adam is harder to connect with. It might have just been me, but the fact that he practically ‘stole’ the post cards in the first place, instead of giving them to the family, just stuck with me.  The only negative I found with the novel was the jumping around of viewpoints. Most times, Lewis makes it obvious whose head you following at that moment, but a few times he jumps characters, mid-chapter.  Otherwise, the novel told a beautiful story of love and living life to the fullest. I would definitely recommend to the romance lovers of the world. I received this book for free from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group for an honest review. 
Griperang72 More than 1 year ago
I was first drawn to this book because the idea of finding all those postcards from years ago where a husband wrote his wife every Friday sounded to me like a great story to read. I was then pleasantly surprised when I found out how much it read like a Nicholas Sparks book and just like his book this book gives you a feeling a love as you read it. This is a great love story that is a nice weekend read for anyone. I liked the characters and thought the author did a very good job on his debut novel. I look forward to reading more books by him.
Ashley_22 More than 1 year ago
Adam Colby was doing his job, going through the rest of the Alexanders' possessions, when he stumbles across 60 years worth of post cards. Each with a love poem. Each sent on every Friday for 60 years. Each to Gabe Alexander's wife, Huck. Adam, who has gone through a divorce & had lost his faith in love, has become entranced by the story of the Alexander's love. Travel back in time & relive the story of their love with Adam, as the postcards & their adopted Granddaughter help tell Adam the amazing story of their love. This book is AMAZING! I couldn't put it down. I love the way it is written. It reads close to a Nicolas Sparks book, who happens to be one of my favorite authors...I would recommend this book to anyone who has high faith & hope in Love. *I received this book free from Waterbrook Press in return for my review of this product.