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Overview

Discusses the latest results in academia and industry on green composites. Existing machinability problems like low processability and reduction of the ductility are addressed and discussed in relation to use of adhesion promoters, additives or chemical modification of the filler to overcome these problems. Recent industrial efforts to minimize the environmental impact, e.g. biodegradable polymer matrix, renewable sources complete the approach.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9783110441949
Publisher: De Gruyter
Publication date: 09/25/2017
Series: Advanced Composites Series , #7
Pages: 161
Product dimensions: 6.69(w) x 9.45(h) x (d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

J. Paulo Davim, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal.

Table of Contents

Preface v

List of contributing authors xi

1 Green composite materials from liquefied biomass Mehmet Hakki Alma Tufan Salan Ayhan Tozluoglu Oktay Gonultas Zeki Candan 1

1.1 Introduction 1

1.2 Liquefaction technique 2

1.3 Foams 4

1.3.1 Polyurethane foams (PUFs) from liquefied lignocellulosics 5

1.3.2 Phenolic foam from liquefied lignocellulosics 8

1.4 Molding materials 10

1.4.1 Liquefied wood as replacement in novolac-type resin-based composites 12

1.4.2 Epoxy-type resins from liquefied biomass 16

1.5 Fibers 17

1.5.1 Fibers from liquefied lignocellulosics 19

1.5.2 Carbon and activated-carbon fiber from liquefied lignocellulosics 19

1.6 Films and coatings 21

1.6.1 Liquefaction of biomass for polyester production 21

1.6.2 Liquefied biomass as replacement for polyurethane films 24

1.6.3 Self-crosslinking film from liquefied biomass 24

1.7 Liquefied wood as replacement in fiber and ceramic 24

1.8 Conclusion 27

2 Tribological aspects of natural fiber composites Prasanta Sahoo Suman Kalyan Das Samir Kumar Acharya 33

2.1 Introduction 33

2.2 Significance of tribology in development of materials 34

2.3 Natural fiber composites 34

2.3.1 About natural fibers 35

2.3.2 Classification of natural fibers 35

2.3.3 Classification of green composites 37

2.3.4 Applications of natural fiber composites 40

2.4 Chemical modification of fiber surface-improving fiber-matrix adhesion 41

2.4.1 Alkaline treatment 42

2.4.2 Benzoyl chloride treatment 43

2.4.3 Permanganate treatment 43

2.5 Mechanical characteristics of natural fiber composites 44

2.5.1 Effect of micro- and nanofiller 46

2.5.2 Morphology of tensile tested composites 49

2.6 Tribological behavior of natural fiber composites 50

2.6.1 Measuring friction and wear 51

2.6.2 Friction characteristics of natural fiber composites 52

2.6.3 Wear behavior of natural fiber composites 53

2.6.4 Post-test morphology and wear mechanism 59

2.6.5 Tribological anisotropy in natural fiber composites 61

2.7 Closure 64

3 Development and characterization of novel fiber reinforced hybrid friction composites S. Manoharan V. Krishnaraj R. Vijay D. Lenin Singaravelu B. Suresha 69

3.1 Introduction 69

3.1.1 Research gap based on literature inference 71

3.1.2 Objectives of the present study 71

3.2 Materials and method 72

3.2.1 Materials 72

3.2.2 Processing 75

3.2.3 Experimentation 76

3.3 Results and discussion 82

3.3.1 Thermal, mechanical and thermomechanical analysis of basalt-recycled aramid fiber reinforced friction composites 82

3.3.2 Abrasive wear behavior of basalt-recycled aramid fiber reinforced hybrid friction composites 87

3.3.3 Fade and recovery behavior of basalt-recycled aramid fiber reinforced friction composites 102

3.4 Conclusion 111

4 Machining defects in green composites J. Babu Jose Philip J. Paulo Davim 115

4.1 Introduction 116

4.2 Defects in drilling of NFRCs 116

4.2.1 Delamination in NFRCs 118

4.2.2 Mechanisms of delamination 118

4.2.3 Methods of measuring delamination 119

4.2.4 Assessment of delamination 119

4.2.5 Delamination in NFRCs 122

4.2.6 Geometrical errors 123

4.2.7 Thermal damages 123

4.3 Machining defects in milling 124

4.3.1 Delamination in milling 125

4.3.2 Geometrical errors 126

4.4 Machining defects in turning 128

4.5 Summary 128

5 GUSMRC - From concept to structural application M. A. A. Aldahdooh Ali Alnuaimi A. Jamrah N. Muhamad Bunnori M.A. Megat Johari M. I. Martini 133

5.1 Introduction 133

5.2 UHPFRCCs: Definition and constituent materials 133

5.3 POFA: definition and its applications in concrete production 135

5.3.1 UPOFA treatment procedure 136

5.4 GUSMRC definition, development, and its applications 137

5.4.1 Development process 137

5.4.2 Tensile behavior of GUSMRC 139

5.4.3 GUSMRC application 140

5.5 Conclusion 142

5.6 Recommendations for future research 142

Index 147

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