Just So Stories: And Other Tales

Just So Stories: And Other Tales

Audio Other(Other - Abridged, 4 Cassettes)

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Overview

Everyone knows Rudyard Kipling's animals are the ones most worthknowing anywhere. This collection—beautifully performed by Boris Karloff—includes Kipling's Just So Stories (where we meet the animals when the world was new—so new, in fact, that the Rhinoceros had not yet losthis buttons!) and stories from his timeless classic, The Jungle Book.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780694524761
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 06/28/2001
Edition description: Abridged, 4 Cassettes
Pages: 5
Product dimensions: 4.40(w) x 7.20(h) x 1.30(d)

About the Author

Rudyard Kipling was born in Bombay (now known as Mumbai), India, but returned with his parents to England at the age of five. Among Kipling’s best-known works are The Jungle Book, Just So Stories, and the poems “Mandalay” and “Gunga Din.” Kipling was the first English-language writer to receive the Nobel Prize for literature (1907) and was among the youngest to have received the award. 

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Just So Stories 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 104 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I grew up with my Mom reading the Just So Stories to me. They were clever and I enjoyed them thoroughly. I don't think I can ever forget the way my Mom used to read The Elephant's Child to me. She'd would always use funny voices. I highly recommend this book. I garantee full enjoyment for the whole family!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Let me make it clear that I am reviewing the Signet Classics version of Just So Stories. The reason I say that is because the original versions of these stories contain material that would be offensive to most people today, but the worst of that has been removed from this edition. The other advantage of this version is that it contains Kipling's own illustrations and his captions for those illustrations. Finally, this version is also very inexpensive. These stories were told to Kipling in their original form when he was a child by his Indian nursemaids. They are drawn from many non-Western sources, and provide good contrasts with European fairy tales. In most cases, the stories are about animals or early human beings and their development into their modern form or capabilities. But they are really satires on human weaknesses, with the moral showing how overcoming a weakness will usually create a strength. Here are the stories and their morals: How the Whale Got His Throat -- If you get too greedy, you will bite off more than you can chew. By taking on less at a time, you can absorb more in total. How the Camel Got His Hump -- If you are lazy and procrastinate, you will just have to do without in the future and be less attractive in order to make up for it. Having resources for times of scarcity is always helpful. How the Rhinoceros Got His Skin -- Being too aggressive will cause you to experience retribution from those you harm. With more flexibility, you can be more agile. How the Leopard Got His Spots -- You have a better chance of success if you blend in, rather than trying to stand out individually too much. The Elephant's Child -- If you are too nosy, you can get into mischief. Having a keen nose can help you sniff out and execute more opportunities. The Sing-Song of Old Man Kangaroo -- Be careful what you wish for, you may get it. Being boundless gives you the chance to explore more. The Beginning of the Armadillo -- Versatility is more valuable than knowing just one way to handle a situation. How the First Letter Was Written -- Miscommunication is easier to accomplish than correct communication. Double-check to be sure the message is understood. How the Alphabet Was Made -- Choose combinations of communication that are unambiguous, or you will find yourself confusing everyone. This story is a brilliant essay on how one might go about inventing written language. The Crab that Played with the Sea -- Consider the consequences of your actions before you act, or you may see the actions rebound against you. The Cat that Walked by Himself -- The benefits of helping others greatly improve one's own life. The Butterfly that Stamped -- Actions taken for the right reason have just consequences while actions taken for pride tend to boomerang against us. Each story contains a prose tale, followed by a brief poem. The illustrations are explained in the caption at the end. The style of the stories includes lots of funny repetition, especially in the names of rivers and the features of the animals being described. With each re
HomeSchoolBookReview More than 1 year ago
In this collection of well-known stories including "The Butterfly that Stamped," "How the Whale Got his Throat," and "The Sing-Song of Old Man Kangaroo," we learn how the camel got his hump, how the leopard got his spots, and how the elephant got his trunk. These are questions that children have asked for centuries around the world, but it took Nobel Prize winning English author Rudyard Kipling to give them answers in these lively, hilarious stories that are drawn from the oral storytelling traditions of India and Africa and filled with mischievously clever animals and people. They have entertained young and old alike for over one hundred years with their intertwined little pearls of wisdom about the pitfalls of arrogance and pride and the importance of curiosity, imagination, and inventiveness. We have previously read and enjoyed Kipling's The Jungle Books ("Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" is one of my favorite stories of all time), and the Just So Stories are a worthy and delightful follow up. It is important, of course, to remember that these stories are just myths or legends and told with a dose of tongue in cheek humor. In fact, there will be a few inside jokes that only adults will understand--nothing risque or inappropriate, just some plays on words that may be over the heads of some children. However, when we explained them to Jeremy, age twelve, he found them funny. In Hand that Rocks the Cradle, Nathaniel Bluedorn noted, "This story of how the leopard got his spots, how the elephant stretched his nose, et cetera. These stories are told in easy flowing language."
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was surprised to find the N word used. I guess my folks changed the stories when I was little, because I wasnt expecting it. Beware when you are reading to your kids.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Just So Stories are a collection of short 'Creation stories'. How the camel got his hump, How the leopard got his spots, etc. They are meant to be read aloud and the audio version is fantastic.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love it !
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Some awkward spacing but at least the words are all there, readable if imperfect.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was hoping to see illustrations having to do with the stories but there were none at all. The stories are pretty much the same as the other versions though.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wow i loved this book nd stories!!!!!! Nd for all of u ppl who said it had crapy words...hello its supposed to b like that!!!!!! Duh!!!!!!!!!! Ok good night:)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved it! Even better than the Jungle Book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I hate digitized versions...no pics...lots of texts errors...i wanted pdf scanned original pages
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The begining of the armadillos is probably my favorite especially when painted jaguar was confused about which one was tortoise and which was a hedgehog
Torie Tonelli More than 1 year ago
Great book!!! I think every kid should read it!
Margaret Ogden More than 1 year ago
I have looked at many copies before finding one that was not rotten with transcription errors. This one has the original pictures with no random font changes. Kipling deserves a clean transcription like this.
Guest More than 1 year ago
great way to learn something of the past. by listening to an authors words from the past to under stand the past
Guest More than 1 year ago
I haven't read this book in at least 30 years, but it was one of my favorites and I can still remember some parts from the all the wonderful stories. A definite read for children.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Children love to hear the stories in this book. It is written like no other book I have read. Read it OUT LOUD and with enthusiasm. Listen to the sounds of the words from your own voice and you and your children will see why it is treasured.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Kipling, unfortunately, has been too long forgotten by parents when it comes to reading to children. Though the Jungle Book is wonderful his other works should not collect dust on the bookshelf. This is a truly outstanding selection. The cadence of his prose inspires animation in the reader and the listener. If you haven't read to your children in a while, pick this one up. Relive your own sense of wonder as a child, stir your child's imagination, and watch the love of reading blossom.
DGibson on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Quirky and whimsical stories that give explanations for such things as an elephant's trunk, a camel's hump, or the tides. The tales themselves have a distinct non-Western feel, and could easily be mistaken for older, traditional tales despite being written by a Brit in the early 1900s. The tales are unique but written in an odd almost oral style that takes some getting used to. They might be better read aloud than read internally. Having enjoyed the tales as a child I am uncertain if they would still be appealing to modern children or if they're still appreciated even in the modern age.
dmmjlllt on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
My grandmother gave me this book, and while Kipling's stock has fallen somewhat precipitously since her day, this (along with the Jungle Book) remains a brisk seller and a staple of bookstore children's departments. And it's not too difficult to see why, when you read it. It's delightful.The conceit is that of a collection of origin stories: "How the Leopard Got His Spots", "How the Camel Got His Hump", things along those lines. They are of course, absurd and whimsical, and one of the joys of them is that they are whimsical in an Edwardian way. There is a way of being silly and madcap that belongs properly to our own era, not too difficult to find, and you find yourself subconsciously expecting that sort of feel here. What you get is different, in a different tone, let's say. Almost like a familiar melody transposed into a different key. It's refreshing and fun. He's sort of made up his own sort of traditional-storytelling diction, as well, which works like a charm.The best story, for my money, is "The Elephant's Child", but there are few true stinkers here. A true classic that deserves to be rediscovered.
Terpsichoreus on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Beautiful and wonderful. Works of genius by a man who freed himself enough that he could give himself up to that genius instead of trying to make sure that it came out perfectly. As pleasing as his other works are, none I've read can match the joy, humor, simplicity, and odd truth of these.Like children's literature should be, these stories never lose their humor or punch. Despite some redundancy with actual myths and some cases of artificially lowering complexity for children and hence growing transparent, eminently enjoyable.
Embejo on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
My favourite was `How the Camel Got His Hump¿. The stories are short and funny, and each have a little message or something for the reader to think about. We have an edition illustrated by the author and he¿s written lovely captions too.I¿m so glad we own a copy of this one as I¿m sure they are stories we¿ll read again. And again. And again as each child grows into them.
lauraejensen on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A bizarre collection of fantastical explanations for things such as how the camel got his humps. Clever, and imaginative, useful in the classroom as vocabulary building, and how-to's, as well as creative writing. Some of Kipling's attitudes are questionable, and may need to be filtered.