The Lost Explorer: Finding Mallory on Mount Everest

The Lost Explorer: Finding Mallory on Mount Everest

Audio Other(Other - Abridged, 4 Cassettes)

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Overview

On June 8, 1924, George Leigh Mallory and Andrew "Sandy" Irvine were last seen climbing toward the summit of Mount Everest. Clouds soon closed around them, and they vanished into history. Ever since, mountaineers have wondered whether they reached the summit.

On May 1, 1999, Conrad Anker, one of the world's strongest mountaineers, discovered Mallory's body lying facedown, frozen into the scree and naturally mummified at 27,000 feet on Everest's North Face. The condition of the body, as well as the artifacts found with Mallory, are important clues in determining his fate. Seventeen days later, Anker free-climbed the Second Step, a 90-foot sheer cliff that is the single hardest obstacle on the north ridge. The first expedition known to have conquered the Second Step, a Chinese team in 1975, had tied a ladder to the cliff, leaving unanswered the question of whether Mallory could have climbed it in 1924. Anker's climb was the first test since Mallory's of the cliff's true difficulty. In treacherous conditions, Anker led teammate Dave Hahn from the Second Step to the summit.

Reflecting on the climb, Anker explains why he thinks Mallory and Irvine failed to make the summit, but at the same time he expresses his awe at Mallory's achievement with the primitive equipment of the time. Stunningly handsome and charismatic, Mallory charmed everyone who met him during his lifetime and continues to fascinate mountaineers today.

The Lost Explorer is the remarkable story of this extraordinarily talented man and of the equally talented modern climber who spearheaded a discovery that may ultimately help solve the mystery of Mallory's disappearance.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780684872490
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio
Publication date: 11/01/1999
Edition description: Abridged, 4 Cassettes
Pages: 5
Product dimensions: 4.16(w) x 7.07(h) x 1.23(d)

About the Author

David Roberts is the author of seventeen books on mountaineering, adventure, and the history of the American Southwest. His essays and articles have appeared in National Geographic, National Geographic Adventure, and The Atlantic Monthly, among other publications. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

David Roberts is the author of seventeen books on mountaineering, adventure, and the history of the American Southwest. His essays and articles have appeared in National Geographic, National Geographic Adventure, and The Atlantic Monthly, among other publications. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

David Roberts is the author of seventeen books on mountaineering, adventure, and the history of the American Southwest. His essays and articles have appeared in National Geographic, National Geographic Adventure, and The Atlantic Monthly, among other publications. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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Lost Explorer 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was well written and really gripping. For the first time this was a book I could not put down before finishing.
mewilbur on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The story of the disappearance of George Mallory and his climbing partner, Sandy Irvine, while ascending or descending Mount Everest on June 8, 1924 has fascinated mountain fans for decades. They were last seen ascending the upper reaches somewhere between the "First" and "Second Steps." Did they make it to the summit? Did the accident which took their lives occur on the way up or on the way down? Ultimately these questions cannot be answered; however, until the May 1999 NOVA/BBC sponsered search for Mallory's and Irvine's remains there was little evidence on which to base speculation. This book tells the story of Conrad's Anker's discovery of Mallory's body, his carefully reasoned suggestions about whether they were the first to summit Everest and the scenario of their demise; and it tells the story of George Mallory, the most gifted mountaineer of the first half of the twentieth century and the only man to have been a part of all three British reconnaissance and summit attempts of the 1920s. It's a good quick read for the armchair adventurist.
Jen42 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is a nice companion to Ghosts of Everest - it takes a less romanticized view of the same project, and comes to what feels to me like a more likely conclusion. Ghosts of Everest brought me to my fascination with Everest, but I really like Anker's style and impressions. If you read one, I very much suggest reading the other.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great book.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
it was a well writen book it was easy to read all their facts were correct as far as i know. it gives a very insightfull look into mallories life
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