Magic Tree House Fact Tracker #16: Polar Bears and the Arctic: A Nonfiction Companion to Magic Tree House #12: Polar Bears Past Bedtime

Magic Tree House Fact Tracker #16: Polar Bears and the Arctic: A Nonfiction Companion to Magic Tree House #12: Polar Bears Past Bedtime

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Overview

The #1 bestselling chapter book series of all time celebrates 25 years with new covers and a new, easy-to-use numbering system! Getting the facts behind the fiction has never looked better. Track the facts with Jack and Annie!!
 
When Jack and Annie got back from their adventure in Magic Tree House #16: Polar Bears Past Bedtime, they had lots of questions. Why is the Arctic so cold? What did the first people of the Artic eat? How do polar bears cross thin ice? What other animals live in the Arctic? Find out the answers to these questions and more as Jack and Annie track the facts.
Filled with up-to-date information, photos, illustrations, and fun tidbits from Jack and Annie, the Magic Tree House Fact Trackers are the perfect way for kids to find out more about the topics they discovered in their favorite Magic Tree House adventures. And teachers can use Fact Trackers alongside their Magic Tree House fiction companions to meet common core text pairing needs.

Did you know that there’s a Magic Tree House book for every kid?

Magic Tree House: Adventures with Jack and Annie, perfect for readers who are just beginning chapter books
Merlin Missions: More challenging adventures for the experienced reader
Super Edition: A longer and more dangerous adventure
Fact Trackers: Nonfiction companions to your favorite Magic Tree House adventures

Have more fun with Jack and Annie at MagicTreeHouse.com!

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780307975348
Publisher: Random House Children's Books
Publication date: 03/28/2012
Series: Magic Tree House Fact Tracker Series
Sold by: Random House
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 128
Sales rank: 1,018,068
Lexile: 730L (what's this?)
File size: 82 MB
Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range: 7 - 10 Years

About the Author

MARY POPE OSBORNE and NATALIE POPE BOYCE are sisters who grew up on army posts all over the world. They are working on more Magic Tree House® Fact Tracker books to give Magic Tree House readers facts and information about places, time periods, and animals that Jack and Annie discover in the Magic Tree House adventures.

Mary lives in Connecticut. Natalie makes her home nearby in the Berkshire Hills of Massachusetts. Mary is the author of all the Magic Tree House fiction titles as well as many more books for kids.

SAL MURDOCCA has illustrated more than 200 children's trade and text books. He is also a librettist for children'sopera, a video artist, an avid runner, hiker, and bicyclist, and a teacher of children's illustration at the Parsons School of Design. Sal lives and works in New York with his wife, Nancy.

Hometown:

Goshen, Connecticut

Date of Birth:

May 20, 1949

Place of Birth:

Fort Sill, Oklahoma

Education:

B.A., University of North Carolina

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Magic Tree House Fact Tracker #16: Polar Bears and the Arctic: A Nonfiction Companion to Magic Tree House #12: Polar Bears Past Bedtime 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
cjoley on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A book that explores the contributions of a non-western culture is called Polar Bears in the Arctic. It is a Magic Tree House Research Guide that discusses life in the Arctic and how Polar Bears as well as people have survived there for thousands of years. The book is written by sisters named Mary Pope Osborne and Natalie Pope Boyce. Through their research when writing this book, they have become more aware of the effect of global warming on the animals in the Arctic. The book is illustrated by Sal Murdocca. This book is appropriate for second grade through fifth grade readers.The book starts out explaining where the Arctic Circle is and why it is so cold there. The book touches on geographical facts about the location of the equator, North Pole, South Pole, and types of landforms found in the Arctic. The tilt of the earth and its relationship to the sun play a large factor in the temperature at the Arctic Circle. The book goes on to tell about the animals and Arctic people that have lived there for thousands of years. These first people of the Arctic are often referred to as Eskimos, but today they would prefer to be called the Inuit of Canada or Greenland and the Yup¿ik of Alaska. They survived by hunting and eating animals, fishing, and by making their own boats, sleds, houses and clothes. For example, these native people of the Arctic have used animal skins to make clothes and boats. They sewed with needles carved from animal bones and thread made of animal tendons. They did not travel by car because they did not have roads. They made dogsleds out of wood and animal bones to transport people around the arctic. Despite many changes and the availability of gas, oil, fish and minerals, many Arctic natives prefer to live like their ancestors did and follow the same customs and are proud to be related to the first people to live in the Arctic. The book describes the animal life in the Arctic. The polar bear, whale, hare, fox, weasel, lemming, wolverine, wolf, seal, narwhal, walrus, all live in the Arctic and each has their own way of surviving the freezing cold weather. The book talks about the animals that hibernate, and the ones that migrate to warmer weather when the temperatures drop too low. It also talks about the effects of global warming on the animal life in the Arctic. I would use this book with a science lesson on animal life around the world. I would also use it as part of a study on how native people of the Arctic lived. They did not use modern conveniences to survive. They made all of their own things out of animal skins, bone, or items from nature. I would also use it to illustrate the effects of global warming.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I like it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Stupid
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is the best book ever!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ghuhgygfy
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ok nubmerb 1 if you dont like the magic tree house then why read it and what dog do you have let me guess those annoying tiny dogs i hate those dogs
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book reminds me of my dog it is so cute Ps. I don't really like the magic tree house
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A small igloo that keeps food from rotting.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I hate it