The Mystery of the Yellow Room (Detective Club Crime Classics)

The Mystery of the Yellow Room (Detective Club Crime Classics)

by Gaston Leroux, John Curran

NOOK BookePub edition (eBook - ePub edition)

$11.99 View All Available Formats & Editions

Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
WANT A NOOK?  Explore Now

Overview

One of the defining novels of the entire crime genre, Gaston Leroux’s The Mystery of the Yellow Room has inspired readers and writers including Agatha Christie and John Dickson Carr, and is now republished in hardback in the Detective Club series with a brand new introduction.

Breaking down her door in response to the sounds of a violent attack and a gunshot, Mademoiselle Stangerson’s rescuers are appalled to find her dying on the floor, clubbed down by a large mutton bone. But in a room with a barred window and locked door, how could her assailant have entered and escaped undetected? While bewildered police officials from the Sûreté begin an exhaustive investigation, so too does a young newspaperman, Joseph Rouletabille, who will encounter more impossibilities before this case can be closed.

The Mystery of the Yellow Room by Gaston Leroux, best remembered today as the author of The Phantom of the Opera, has been deservedly praised for more than a century as a defining book in the ‘impossible crime’ genre, as readable now as when it first appeared in French in 1907.

This Detective Club classic includes an introduction by John Curran, who discusses how the book impressed and influenced a young Agatha Christie, was lauded by genre giants including John Dickson Carr, Ellery Queen and Julian Symons, and remains to this day one of the most effective and enjoyable locked room mysteries ever written.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780008167042
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 08/09/2018
Series: Detective Club Crime Classics
Sold by: HarperCollins Publishers
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 256
Sales rank: 567,440
File size: 3 MB

About the Author

John Curran is the long-time literary advisor to Agatha Christie's estate, often giving talks and appearing on documentaries about her life. He has spent the last few years unpicking the notebooks and deciphering Agatha Christie's handwriting for this, his first book.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Mystery of the Yellow Room 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Enjoyable story. Terribletranslation to ebook withmany errors making reading a challenge
Illuminator More than 1 year ago
This particular version is scanned so poorly that it is virtually unreadable. If you want this story, buy a different version. Note to B&N: Why would you allow a book like this a place in your inventory?
Elizabeth Smith More than 1 year ago
If I may be so bold as to suggest it, I believe The Yellow Room rivals even Agatha Christie's finest. The literary style is easy to read (even with all the typos from digitizing.) If you like mysteries, read this one!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Really good mystery; really badly scanned edition. Look elsewhere for a copy.
Janet Showalter More than 1 year ago
I have repeatedly tried to read past page 56 in this version, but to no avail for I'm continually returned to page 28. I suggest that you Google the title and read it for free.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was a.good book but eerily similar to Poe's "Murders in the Rue Morgue". Even the main characters are uncomfortably similar.
atimco on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
"The presbytery has lost none of its charm; nor the garden its brightness."These enigmatic words are just one of the many tantalizing clues scattered throughout Gaston Leroux's famous detective novel, The Mystery of the Yellow Room. Published in serial form in 1907 and in its entirety in 1908, this book has become one of the pivotal works in the genre, and is the great-grandfather (or at least the great-uncle!) of all "locked room" mysteries. In an isolated chateau in the French countryside, the beautiful Mademoiselle Stangerson is attacked in her locked chamber. When her father and servant break into the room in response to her desperate cries for help, they find no trace of her assailant ¿ though there is just one door, all the windows have grills, and there is nowhere in the small room for the would-be murderer to hide. It is a most perplexing case for the police... but not for the young reporter Joseph Rouletabille, who manages to insinuate himself into the household to unravel the baffling case. Many of the hallmarks of the mystery genre are present in this story. The tale is narrated by Rouletabille's friend St. Clair, who is very like Holmes' Watson: slow on the uptake and providing a perfect foil to the detective's genius. He is us, of course, carried along wondering at the detective's crazy fancies which all turn out to be spot-on. Naturally! In addition to the stock character of the clueless friend, Rouletabille also has a professional rival in the famous detective Frederic Larsan, who has been called in specially for the case. Rouletabille is keen to prove his mettle to the older and more experienced Larsan. Rouletabille's particular forte is not, like Holmes', a vast knowledge of the minutiae of crime-scene evidence. Rather, Rouletabille's methods are based on what he calls "pure reason," and on taking that reason "by the right end." Leroux, who is probably better known for The Phantom of the Opera, certainly has a gift for creating haunting ideas. There is something so creepy about his description of the "cry of the Good Lord's Beast," and the recurring hint of the "perfume of the Lady in Black" (which is the title of the book's sequel). Leroux is not afraid to hint at supernatural occurrences, but he never overdoes it and the result is quite pleasingly atmospheric. There are certainly several very improbable coincidences that happen along the way to make the mystery possible, but they are forgivable. This translation (which I believe is the older American one) has a few lamentable mistakes in grammar, with several dangling modifiers and awkward constructions. This translation also repeatedly calls Mlle. Stangerson's assailant "the murderer," though the term is technically incorrect according to the events of the story. I found it slightly annoying, but ignorable. I would have given this book four stars if it were not for these issues. I listened to this on audiobook, read by Robert Whitfield, and enjoyed his reading very much. I loved his French pronunciations of the characters' names. It's interesting to think that I absorbed this story in much the same fashion as it was first published: in serial form. I listened to it for an hour a day on my commute. The technology changes but the stories don't. I would recommend this to fans of mysteries, but not to those looking for a good place to start in the genre. I have a high tolerance for ramblers, and this narrative does ramble at times. But I'm looking forward to the next two books in the series; though Rouletabille lacks the straightforward charm of a Roderick Alleyn or Lord Peter Wimsey, I found his youthful exuberance and boldness amusing. And I confess, now I'm curious about the perfume of the Lady in Black! Overall, this is an enjoyable tale that keeps its secrets till the very end.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago