Print Technology in Scotland and America, 1740-1800

Print Technology in Scotland and America, 1740-1800

by Louis Kirk McAuley

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Overview

In Print Technology in Scotland and America Louis Kirk McAuley investigates the mediation of popular-political culture in Scotland and America, from the transatlantic religious revivals known as the Great Awakening to the U.S. presidential election of 1800. By focusing on Scotland and America—and, in particular, the tension between unity and fragmentation that characterizes eighteenth-century Scottish and American literature and culture—Print Technology aims to increase our understanding of how tensions within these corresponding political and cultural arenas altered the meaning of print as an instrument of empire and nation building. McAuley reveals how seemingly disparate events, including journalism and literary forgery, were instrumental and innovative deployments of print not as a liberation technology (as Habermas’s analysis of print's structural transformation of the public sphere suggests), but as a mediator of political tensions.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781611485448
Publisher: Bucknell University Press
Publication date: 11/07/2013
Series: Transits: Literature, Thought & Culture, 1650-1850
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 326
File size: 7 MB

About the Author

Louis Kirk McAuley is assistant professor of English at Washington State University.

Table of Contents

Contents

List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Chapter One: Noise (and Noise Abatement) in Scotland and America
Chapter Two: To “Bring Forward a General Scream”: George Whitefield, Mob Rules, and the Noise of Religious Enthusiasm
Chapter Three: The “Torrent’s Roar”: Agricultural Improvement, Colonial Administration, and the Reorganization of Noise in James Macpherson’s The Poems of Ossian
Chapter Four: Creating a “Perfect Union of Opinion”: The Polygraph, Thomas Jefferson, and the Presidential Election of 1800
Chapter Five: “Periodical Visitations”: Crises of Representation in Charles Brockden Brown’s Arthur Mervyn
Bibliography
About the Author
Index

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