Race Against The Machine: How the Digital Revolution is Accelerating Innovation, Driving Productivity, and Irreversibly Transforming Employment and the Economy
Race Against The Machine: How the Digital Revolution is Accelerating Innovation, Driving Productivity, and Irreversibly Transforming Employment and the Economy

Race Against The Machine: How the Digital Revolution is Accelerating Innovation, Driving Productivity, and Irreversibly Transforming Employment and the Economy

by Erik Brynjolfsson, Andrew McAfee

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Overview

"We're entering unknown territory in the quest to reduce labor costs. The AI revolution is doing to white collar jobs what robotics did to blue collar jobs. Race Against the Machine is a bold effort to make sense of the future of work. No one else is doing serious thinking about a force that will lead to a restructuring of the economy that is more profound and far-reaching than the transition from the agricultural to the industrial age. Brynjolfsson and McAfee have hit the ball out of the park on this one. It's a book anyone concerned with either business, or more broadly, the future of our society, simply must read." - Tim O'Reilly

"This is, quite simply, the best book yet written on the interaction of digital technology, employment and organization. Race Against the Machine is meticulously researched, sobering, practical and, ultimately, hopeful. It is an extremely important contribution to the debate about how we ensure that every human being benefits from the digital revolution that is still gathering speed. If you read only one book on technology in the next 12 months, it should be this one." -Gary Hamel

"In social science inquiry, we badly need the right people asking, and answering, the right questions. That's precisely what Brynjolfsson and McAfee do in this important treatise on the intersection of technology and the economy. Moreover, they're tackling the most important question of the present and the future: where are the new jobs going to come from?" - Jared Bernstein

"Race Against the Machine is a portrait of the digital world - a world where competition, labor and leadership are less important than collaboration, creativity and networks." - Nicholas Negroponte
Product Description
Why has median income stopped rising in the US?

Why is the share of population that is working falling so rapidly?

Why are our economy and society are becoming more unequal?

A popular explanation right now is that the root cause underlying these symptoms is technological stagnation-- a slowdown in the kinds of ideas and inventions that bring progress and prosperity.

In Race Against the Machine, MIT's Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee present a very different explanation. Drawing on research by their team at the Center for Digital Business, they show that there's been no stagnation in technology -- in fact, the digital revolution is accelerating. Recent advances are the stuff of science fiction: computers now drive cars in traffic, translate between human languages effectively, and beat the best human Jeopardy! players.

As these examples show, digital technologies are rapidly encroaching on skills that used to belong to humans alone. This phenomenon is both broad and deep, and has profound economic implications. Many of these implications are positive; digital innovation increases productivity, reduces prices (sometimes to zero), and grows the overall economic pie.

But digital innovation has also changed how the economic pie is distributed, and here the news is not good for the median worker. As technology races ahead, it can leave many people behind. Workers whose skills have been mastered by computers have less to offer the job market, and see their wages and prospects shrink. Entrepreneurial business models, new organizational structures and different institutions are needed to ensure that the average worker is not left behind by cutting-edge machines.

In Race Against the Machine Brynjolfsson and McAfee bring together a range of statistics, examples, and arguments to show that technological progress is accelerating, and that this trend has deep consequences for skills, wages, and jobs. The book makes the case that employment prospects are grim for many today not because there's been technology has stagnated, but instead because we humans and our organizations aren't keeping up.

Product Details

BN ID: 2940013250932
Publisher: Digital Frontier Press
Publication date: 10/28/2011
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 3 MB

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Race Against The Machine: How the Digital Revolution is Accelerating Innovation, Driving Productivity, and Irreversibly Transforming Employment and th 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed reading this book, which i purchased and read after hearing both Andrew and Erik speak at the MIT CIO conference last week. The book is well organized and very rasonable in its conclusions, implications, and recommendations. While it ultimately serves as a celebration of the potential role technology based innovation can play in our eceonomies and lives, it is also very realistic and clear eyed in identifying the potential negative disruptions (especially in employment) that will come with this, and put forth some great suggestions for addressing them. It's a quick and cogent read, and i really enjoyed it. Anyone interested in this topic - and most of us should be - will enjoy it as well.
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DigiCR More than 1 year ago
Why can I get this book in paperback from Amazon and not from Barnes & Noble.B&N only sells the digital version? I don't get it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It is extremely annoying to HAVE to read a book in digital form. While I get that this goes along with the book's topic, I refuse to buy a kindle or a nook simply to read a book. One less sale. One less mind edified.