ISBN-10:
0895986728
ISBN-13:
9780895986726
Pub. Date:
01/28/2000
Publisher:
Perfection Learning Corporation
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

by Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Overview

Samuel Taylor Coleridge [RL 10 IL 10-12] A sailor kills a good-luck omen—an albatross. Theme: consequences of disrespect for life. 52 pages. Tale Blazers.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780895986726
Publisher: Perfection Learning Corporation
Publication date: 01/28/2000
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 51
Sales rank: 236,188
Product dimensions: 4.90(w) x 7.40(h) x 0.40(d)

About the Author

Samuel Taylor Coleridge was born in the English town of Ottery St Mary, where his father was a vicar, in 1772. The youngest of ten children, he attended school with Charles Lamb and spent two years at Jesus College, Cambridge where he was introduced to radical politics and theology by the poet Robert Southey. He first met William Wordsworth in 1795 and they published a joint poetry collection, Lyrical Ballads, in 1798; this highly praised volume, which started the English Romantic Movement, contained the first version of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. Alongside finding success with his poetry, Coleridge’s critical work, especially on Shakespeare, was highly influential. However much of his life was blighted by illness, opium addiction, financial problems and depression. He died of heart failure in London in 1834.

Table of Contents

To the Author of 'The Robbers' [sonnet; 1794?]
Sonnet: To a Friend Who Asked, How I Felt When the Nurse First Presented My Infant to Me [1796]
This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison [1797]
The Dungeon [1797]
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner [1797-98, revised later; marginal glosses added 1815-16]
On a Ruined House in a Romantic Country [No. III of 'Sonnets Attempted in the Manner of Contemporary Writers,' 1797]
Christabel [Part 1, 1797; Part II, 1800; 'The Conclusion to Part II,' 1801]
Frost at Midnight [1798]
France: An Ode [1798]
Lewti; or, The Circassian Love-Chaunt [1798]
Fears in Solitude [1798]
The Nightingale [1798]
Kubla Khan [1798]
The Ovidian Elegiac Metre [1799]
Something Childish, but Very Natural [1799]
Love [1799]
Dejection: An Ode [1802]
The Pains of Sleep [1803]
To William Wordsworth [1807]
The Knight's Tomb [1817?]
On Donne's Poetry [1818?]
Youth and Age [1823, with additions in 1832]
Cologne [1828]

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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This digitized copy is a real let-down. Why even waste time creating this. The geniuses at google took something that reflected what some would call an elequent use of the english language and made pure rubbish from it. Great job.
Tullius22 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
It's magnificent--a true English epic. I 'cannot choose but hear'. (10/10)
tess_schoolmarm on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is my all time favorite epic poem for many reasons, among them being the beauty of the words. Coleridge eloquently tells the rough and tough story of the sea with deaths and shootings in a refined manner. Not only is his choice of words well above the average cut, but the order in which he places the words delights the reader. This is a yearly read for me.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If not for this poem iron maiden never would have made it into an amazing song 10/10
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is my favourite poem ever. Ill try not to sound too English majory, but i really koved Coleridge's vivid usage of imagery. I also loved the divinity of nature intertwining with the divinity of Christ through the metaphor of the Albatross. Grest poem. It will always be my favourite
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The illustrations are amazing and poetry also
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