ISBN-10:
0136000975
ISBN-13:
2900136000975
Pub. Date:
02/11/2008
Publisher:
Pearson
Roman Art / Edition 5

Roman Art / Edition 5

by Nancy H. Ramage
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Overview

This exceptionally well-illustrated text explores Roman art in the traditional historical manner —with a focus on painting, sculpture, architecture, and minor arts. It assumes no prior acquaintance with the classical world, and explains the necessary linguistic, historical, religious, social, and political background needed to fully understand Roman art. In-depth information, historical photographs, drawings, engravings, and illustrations of architectural monuments, sculptures, paintings and decorative arts in all areas. Chronological presentation of material features: the Villanovan and Etruscan Forerunners 1000-200 BC.; the Roman Republic 200-27 BC; Augustus and the Imperial Idea 27 BC-AD 14; The Julio-Claudians AD 14-68; The Flavians: Savior to Despot AD 69-98; Trajan, Optimus Princeps AD 98-117; Hadrian and the Classical Revival AD 117-138; The Antonines AD 138-198; The Severans AD 193-235; The Soldier Emperors AD 235-284 AD; The Tetrarchs AD 284-312; Constantine AD 307-337 and the Aftermath.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 2900136000975
Publisher: Pearson
Publication date: 02/11/2008
Series: MySearchLab Series for Art Series
Edition description: Older Edition
Pages: 384
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 1.25(h) x 9.00(d)

About the Author

Nancy H. Ramage is the Dana Professor of the Humanities and Arts Emerita at Ithaca College, where she was department chair for eleven years, and where she won the Excellence in Teaching Award. She was a Visiting Fellow at Clare Hall, Cambridge University, and is now a life member of that college. An art historian who specializes in Roman art, she also writes and lectures on the history of collecting, and on the influence of the Romans on 18th and 19th century decorative arts. She was an academic trustee of the Archaeological Institute of America, and was head of their lecture program for several years. She serves on the governing board of the Wedgwood International Seminar, and on the Council of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University, where she received her doctoral degree. Professor Ramage has worked at the Archaeological Excavations at Sardis, Turkey, for many years, and has written about the sculpture and pottery from that site. Among her numerous honors and awards, she has been a Getty Museum scholar, a recipient of several grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, and a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, London.

Andrew Ramage is professor emeritus of the History of Art and Archaeology at Cornell University, where he was previously Director of the Archaeology Program and Chair of the Department. He previously taught at the University of Michigan and the University of Massachusetts in Boston. At Harvard University, where he earned his doctorate, he was keeper of the coins at the Fogg Art Museum. He is Associate Director of the Harvard/Cornell Archaeological Exploration of Sardis, in Turkey, and is writing a book about the houses and workshops of the early Lydians who lived there. He is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London, and a life member of Clare Hall, Cambridge University. The Ramages have written several books together; they have six granddaughters.

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

Preface

This book grows from three roots: first, our teaching, which, time and again, has proven to be a rich field for learning, and for thinking of ways to explain a problem in as straightforward a manner as possible; secondly, our firsthand experience working at Roman sites, primarily in England, Italy, and Turkey; and thirdly, the frequent discussions we hold about Roman affairs – at the bottom of a trench, or over the dinner table. Nancy Ramage's participation in the work of the British School at Rome enabled her to live, so to speak, with the art and the ruins; and our joint work at Sardis, Turkey, has given us the opportunity to participate in an on-going excavation, and to see the results of a group effort unfold over many years.

The book is intended first and foremost for students and readers who are launching into the study of Roman art perhaps for the first time. We assume intelligent readers, but we have tried to explain what may riot be obvious in terms of background, be it linguistic, historical, or religious. With a view to showing something of the long study of Roman monuments, we have chosen some of the illustrations from older photographs, engravings, and drawings, which seem to capture the spirit better than modern ones. The architectural remains have been cited and illustrated as their importance requires, but we have tried to illustrate sculpture or painting from collections in the United States, Britain, and Canada, where possible, so that North American and British students will have a better chance of looking at some of the originals.

Of the many scholars who taught us about Roman art, we wouldespecially like to share our warm appreciation here for the inspiration of several mentors who are no longer living: Doris Taylor Bishop, George M. A. Hanfmann, A. H. McDonald, and John B. Ward-Perkins. For specific ideas, we gratefully acknowledge assistance from Ellen, Roger, and Edward Hirschland, David Castriota, J. Stephens Crawford, Caroline Houser, Barbara K. McLauchlin, Elizabeth J. Sherman, Andrew Stewart, Susan Woodford, and the anonymous readers for the press, who made many valuable suggestions. We are also grateful to Norwell F. Therien, Jr., at Prentice Hall, and to Rosemary Bradley and Ursula Sadie at Calmann and King, London, for their outstanding assistance. Our children, Joan and Michael, have been most patient and supportive. We also thank our friends and colleagues with whom we have discussed problems of Roman art - but do not saddle them with responsibility for the positions taken here. And finally, we dedicate this book to the memory of our respective fathers, optimis patribus, each of whom set us upon the Roman road.

PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION

The authors would like to extend their sincere thanks to those friends and scholars who have provided suggestions and ideas for the second edition. Among them are: Frederick M. Ahl, Elizabeth Bartman, Larissa Bonfante, Richard Brilliant, Nancy T. de Grummond, James Higginbotham, Catherine HobeyHamsher, Mary Hollinshead, Eric Hostetter, Michael Koortbojian, Robert D. Markham, Carol C. Mattusch, John G. Pedlep, Roberto Marini, Christopher Parslow, Christopher Simon, E. Marianne Stern, Alice Taylor, Rolf Winkes, Susan Wood, and Susan Woodford; and Elisabeth Ingles, for her help in the final stages.

Nancy Ramage would also like to record her appreciation to the National Endowment for the Humanities, and to Elaine Gazda and Miranda Marvin, for the opportunity to participate in a seminar in Rome on "The Roman Art of Emulation."

Finally, we thank our students, near and far, for their helpful and gratifying comments; after all, we wrote this book for them in the first place.

PREFACE TO THE THIRD EDITION

What greater satisfaction for two authors than to know that not only American and British students and members of the public are learning from our book, but now, also, students and others who speak French, German, Dutch, and Greek . . . and maybe other languages to come. We are immensely gratified and humbled by this development, and it has been a great pleasure to write the third edition, attempting always to keep the text and the pictures up to standard.

We are most grateful to those who have shared observations with us for this latest edition, including Albert Ammerman, Elizabeth Bartman, Kevin Glowacki, Naomi Norman, Paul Rehak, Christopher Roosevelt, Susan Schilling, Jocelyn Penny Small, R. J. A. Wilson, Susan Woodford, Fikret Yegul and especially Carol Mattusch and Richard Mason; and Elisabeth Ingles, Susan Bolsom and Ursula Payne for their fine work on the book. Nancy Ramage would also like to acknowledge her appreciation to Ithaca College for a Faculty Summer Research Grant to help in the preparation of this edition. And we thank our students at Ithaca College and Cornell University for their intelligent and thoughtful comments and lively discussions through many courses taught over the years.

We dedicate this book to the memory of our four parents, including, this time, our mothers, who lived to see the book and who shared with us our joy in its wide readership.

Table of Contents

1. The Villanovan and Etruscan Forerunners 1000-200 BC.
2. The Roman Republic 200-27 BC.
3. Augustus and the Imperial Idea 27 BC-AD 14
4. The Julio-Claudians AD 14-68.
5. The Flavians: Savior to Despot AD 69-98.
6. Trajan, Optimus Princeps AD 98-117.
7. Hadrian and the Classical Revival AD 117-138.
8. The Antonines AD 138-193.
9. The Severans AD 193-235.
10. The Soldier Emperors AD 235-284 AD.
11. The Tetrarchs AD 284-312.
12. Constantine AD 307-337 and the Aftermath.
Roman Emperors.
Ancient Authors.
Glossary.
Select Bibliography.
Photographic Credits.
Index.

Preface

PREFACE:

Preface

This book grows from three roots: first, our teaching, which, time and again, has proven to be a rich field for learning, and for thinking of ways to explain a problem in as straightforward a manner as possible; secondly, our firsthand experience working at Roman sites, primarily in England, Italy, and Turkey; and thirdly, the frequent discussions we hold about Roman affairs – at the bottom of a trench, or over the dinner table. Nancy Ramage's participation in the work of the British School at Rome enabled her to live, so to speak, with the art and the ruins; and our joint work at Sardis, Turkey, has given us the opportunity to participate in an on-going excavation, and to see the results of a group effort unfold over many years.

The book is intended first and foremost for students and readers who are launching into the study of Roman art perhaps for the first time. We assume intelligent readers, but we have tried to explain what may riot be obvious in terms of background, be it linguistic, historical, or religious. With a view to showing something of the long study of Roman monuments, we have chosen some of the illustrations from older photographs, engravings, and drawings, which seem to capture the spirit better than modern ones. The architectural remains have been cited and illustrated as their importance requires, but we have tried to illustrate sculpture or painting from collections in the United States, Britain, and Canada, where possible, so that North American and British students will have a better chance of looking at some of the originals.

Of the many scholars who taught us about Roman art, wewouldespecially like to share our warm appreciation here for the inspiration of several mentors who are no longer living: Doris Taylor Bishop, George M. A. Hanfmann, A. H. McDonald, and John B. Ward-Perkins. For specific ideas, we gratefully acknowledge assistance from Ellen, Roger, and Edward Hirschland, David Castriota, J. Stephens Crawford, Caroline Houser, Barbara K. McLauchlin, Elizabeth J. Sherman, Andrew Stewart, Susan Woodford, and the anonymous readers for the press, who made many valuable suggestions. We are also grateful to Norwell F. Therien, Jr., at Prentice Hall, and to Rosemary Bradley and Ursula Sadie at Calmann and King, London, for their outstanding assistance. Our children, Joan and Michael, have been most patient and supportive. We also thank our friends and colleagues with whom we have discussed problems of Roman art - but do not saddle them with responsibility for the positions taken here. And finally, we dedicate this book to the memory of our respective fathers, optimis patribus, each of whom set us upon the Roman road.

PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION

The authors would like to extend their sincere thanks to those friends and scholars who have provided suggestions and ideas for the second edition. Among them are: Frederick M. Ahl, Elizabeth Bartman, Larissa Bonfante, Richard Brilliant, Nancy T. de Grummond, James Higginbotham, Catherine HobeyHamsher, Mary Hollinshead, Eric Hostetter, Michael Koortbojian, Robert D. Markham, Carol C. Mattusch, John G. Pedlep, Roberto Marini, Christopher Parslow, Christopher Simon, E. Marianne Stern, Alice Taylor, Rolf Winkes, Susan Wood, and Susan Woodford; and Elisabeth Ingles, for her help in the final stages.

Nancy Ramage would also like to record her appreciation to the National Endowment for the Humanities, and to Elaine Gazda and Miranda Marvin, for the opportunity to participate in a seminar in Rome on "The Roman Art of Emulation."

Finally, we thank our students, near and far, for their helpful and gratifying comments; after all, we wrote this book for them in the first place.

PREFACE TO THE THIRD EDITION

What greater satisfaction for two authors than to know that not only American and British students and members of the public are learning from our book, but now, also, students and others who speak French, German, Dutch, and Greek . . . and maybe other languages to come. We are immensely gratified and humbled by this development, and it has been a great pleasure to write the third edition, attempting always to keep the text and the pictures up to standard.

We are most grateful to those who have shared observations with us for this latest edition, including Albert Ammerman, Elizabeth Bartman, Kevin Glowacki, Naomi Norman, Paul Rehak, Christopher Roosevelt, Susan Schilling, Jocelyn Penny Small, R. J. A. Wilson, Susan Woodford, Fikret Yegul and especially Carol Mattusch and Richard Mason; and Elisabeth Ingles, Susan Bolsom and Ursula Payne for their fine work on the book. Nancy Ramage would also like to acknowledge her appreciation to Ithaca College for a Faculty Summer Research Grant to help in the preparation of this edition. And we thank our students at Ithaca College and Cornell University for their intelligent and thoughtful comments and lively discussions through many courses taught over the years.

We dedicate this book to the memory of our four parents, including, this time, our mothers, who lived to see the book and who shared with us our joy in its wide readership.

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