Roots-Thirtieth Anniversary Edition: The Saga of an American Family

Roots-Thirtieth Anniversary Edition: The Saga of an American Family

Paperback(Anniversary)

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Overview


One of the most important books and television series ever to appear, Roots, galvanized the nation, and created an extraordinary political, racial, social and cultural dialogue that hadn’t been seen since the publication of Uncle Tom’s Cabin. The book sold over one million copies in the first year, and the miniseries was watched by an astonishing 130 million people. It also won both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. Roots opened up the minds of Americans of all colors and faiths to one of the darkest and most painful parts of America’s past. 

Over the years, both Roots and Alex Haley have attracted controversy, which comes with the territory for trailblazing, iconic books, particularly on the topic of race. Some of the criticism results from whether Roots is fact or fiction and whether Alex Haley confused these two issues, a subject he addresses directly in the book. There is also the fact that Haley was sued for plagiarism when it was discovered that several dozen paragraphs in Roots were taken directly from a novel, The African, by Harold Courlander, who ultimately received a substantial financial settlement at the end of the case. 

But none of the controversy affects the basic issue. Roots fostered a remarkable dialogue about not just the past, but the then present day 1970s and how America had fared since the days portrayed in Roots. Vanguard Press feels that it is important to publish Roots: The 30th Anniversary Edition to remind the generation that originally read it that there are issues that still need to be discussed and debated, and to introduce to a new and younger generation, a book that will help them understand, perhaps for the first time, the reality of what took place during the time of Roots.
 

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781593154493
Publisher: Da Capo Press
Publication date: 05/28/2007
Edition description: Anniversary
Pages: 912
Sales rank: 1,252,337
Product dimensions: 5.70(w) x 8.10(h) x 2.00(d)
Lexile: 1330L (what's this?)

About the Author


Alex Haley taught himself to write during a twenty year career in the U.S. Coast Guard. After retiring, he worked as a freelance magazine writer. His first book was The Autobiography of Malcom X, on which he was collaborator and editor. Roots: The Saga of An American Family was his second book, for which he was awarded special recognition from the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award committees. He also wrote A Different Kind of Christmas, and Queen, a sequel to Roots. Haley died in 1992.

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Roots-Thirtieth Anniversary Edition: The Saga of an American Family 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 114 reviews.
Star_Dreamer More than 1 year ago
As a young girl I remember sitting in front of the television with my family to watch Roots when it had been made into a series. Over the years I have often wanted to read the book and find all the missing parts that the limited series had left out. I am so very glad that I did. The author took me to a time when human slavery was a common place, and allowed me to feel the attrocities that took place during that time. I felt the pain, love and courage of the people and was very glad to be transported to a era that has long been forgotten and should never be. If you would like to read a book that is a fantastic read as well as a eye opening experience, read this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Roots, by Alex Haley, is an unforgettable novel that might even have you reaching for the tissues. This book tells us about Americas past when we were still thirteen colonies and when slavery was a big issue for the new country. Roots opens up a perspective on slavery that most have never experienced before and some who probably never will. The book Roots by Alex Haley is a book filled with exiting characters, a suspenseful plot that will keep you turning the pages, and a theme like no other. The characters in this touching novel are very well detailed by the author, it's almost like your right there looking the characters in the face. The main character is Kunta, a small village boy who is very well disciplined, his mom Binta, his dad Omoro, and his three younger brothers, Lamin, Swadu, and Mali. When Kunta becomes older and earn his manhood his little brothers look up to him as a role model. The plot in Roots is like no other, it takes place in two places, in his home country of Africa and then the slave based America. It is extremely detailed, it's like you are there right next to the characters! The plot of Roots changes rapidly sometimes and is slow, saddened and mellow, and sometimes it is exciting, energetic. The theme of Roots is sometimes exciting and sometimes it is mellow. In Roots the theme changes rapidly and can sometimes surprise you. For instance one moment Kunta could be running away from slave catchers and then the next thing you know he could be in a cage with his feet and hands locked together in chains. The book Roots can have you reaching for the tissues or sometimes have you laughing. I recommend this book because it is a very good experience for someone who takes the time to read this book. Alex Haley's Roots, has an exciting plot of characters, a plot like no other, and a theme that can change on you within seconds.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Alex Haley was my great-uncle, and although I never got to met him, this book helped me get to know him though his writing. This book is an exceptional story about my family's history and I am so proud of my uncle Alex for writing it.
MrsNave More than 1 year ago
I absolutely loved reading this book.  The movie does not do this book justice, but then what movie ever does. I recommend this book to anyone and everyone I talk to.  Read it its good. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book, Roots by Alex Haley is just a phenomenal book in my opinion and I recommend this book to anyone that wants to learn a little bit about the history of African American slavery In America. This book tells the story of Kunta Kinte (Toby Waller), and a couple of generations after him. This book has a good sense of feel; you can also create imagery of what's going on in the story. This book is powerful enough to make you abhorrent, and bleak.    Since the book is set up the way that it is, you can see how far the African race has come in America. The plot starts from Africa itself, maybe not as far back as the very beginning of the slave trade, but you are still taken through the process of being nabbed, crammed into a tiny slot on a slave ship, and taken to a foreign country for labor. This is a true story that was passed down, so most likely there isn’t anything false about what the book tells you.   Other pieces of history are in the story, I’m not going to tell because I don’t want to give the story away, there definitely are though. The conflicts are what makes the book even more interesting because you can actually put yourself into the setting and understand how the characters felt, and also real people in that time. “A story to remember” is what I call this book. If you didn’t know, there is a movie to this novel. I recommend that you read the book and then watch the movie to see the differences in between the two. The novel has more information in it, which is why you should choose to read the book if you are to choose only one to view. Out of all the other novels on the topic of African-American slavery, this is the most interesting and I highly recommend it. O-Boothe
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Of course I had seen the mini series many many times, but had never read the book. As always the book has more detail, and is even better than what I already loved. I highly recommend this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I haven't finished it yet, but so far I think it's very good, & plan to pass it on to my friends. I saw the movie & it was very good too, although extremely sad in places.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thnx for making the best book ever , Mr or mrs haley
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
After reading the book I watched the DVD. Both were great.
Guest More than 1 year ago
the book is just as riveting as the movie.it brings to life the hardships faced by the black Americans so many years ago.following the lives of these people as they fight for their freedom shows us how strong one can be when they have to.they never let anyone or anything stop them from achieving what they wanted.i can't imagine being manhandled like these people were.everyone should read this book and find out how the black people have earned their rights in America.i believe that it should be required reading for high school students studying American history.
Krista23 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A great historical read, very captivating and heart-wrenching. Slavery in it's very rawest and developed through following the family through generations of trying to reach liberation in the United States.
cbl_tn on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Roots is one of those books that's been around so long that I thought I knew a lot about it before I picked it up to read it. I had always assumed it was a novel, so I was very surprised to learn that the publisher markets it as non-fiction, and that the Library of Congress classifies it as non-fiction. Alex Haley called it "faction". Now that I've read it, my opinion hasn't changed. I would call it historical fiction. While the last 35 pages, where the author himself makes his appearance, is more memoir than fiction, those 35 pages represent less than 4% of the book's total. The rest of the book tells the story of Haley's ancestors embellished with thoughts, feelings, conversations, and detailed descriptions of their physical appearance. Although Haley does discuss his research process and some of his sources, he does not provide enough detail for other researchers to easily retrace his steps. These are characteristics of fiction, not non-fiction.Even though I disagree with the way the book is marketed, I do like the way it's written. The characteristics that make it questionable as non-fiction are what give the book its emotional impact. Who can read it without being moved by the tragedy and dignity of Kunta Kinte's life, or Matilda's faith, or Tom's quiet strength, or the family's joy when freedom finally comes? It's one of the most influential books of the last quarter of the 20th century, and it continues to inspire Americans of all ethnicities to learn more about our own family histories and how our lives are shaped by those who came before us.
EmaNoella on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A beautiful compilation of the story of an American citizen from the very beginning, the roots. From the first African to arrive here to the man who wrote the book, each generation is well described and interestingly realistic to what could have veer possibly happened. Though the dialogue can be co siderably hard to read for it is written in slang, the book was written with a rather simple vocabulary which I am very grateful for considering it's great length. This saga can make anyone appreciate the African American culture and respect them for all the hardships their ancestors have lived.
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