Sustainable Process Integration and Intensification: Saving Energy, Water and Resources

Sustainable Process Integration and Intensification: Saving Energy, Water and Resources

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Overview

In its second edition, Sustainable Process Integration and Intensification continues the presentation of fundamentals of key areas of both fields. Thoroughly updated and extended to include the latest developments, the reader also finds illustrated working sessions for deeper understanding of the taught materials.The book is addressed to graduate students as well as professionals to help the effectively application in plant design and operation.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9783110535358
Publisher: De Gruyter
Publication date: 04/23/2018
Series: De Gruyter Textbook Series
Pages: 324
Product dimensions: 6.69(w) x 9.45(h) x (d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Prof. J. J. Klemes, DSc head of SPIL, NETME Centre, FME, Brno University of Technology, VUT, Czech Republic. He has a long-term research record in Process Integration, energy saving, pollution reduction, integration of renewable sources, waste to energy and susceptibility issues.

Prof. P. S. Varbanov SPIL, NETME Centre, FME, Brno University of Technology, VUT, Czech Republic. His main focus lies on energy efficiency, waste to energy and renewables, energy supply networks.

Prof. S. R. Wan Alwi Director of Process Systems Engineering Centre (PROSPECT), Universiti Teknologi Malaysia. Her research focuses on process integration, pinch analysis and resource minimisation.

Prof. Z. A. Manan Faculty of Chemical and Energy Engineering and Process Systems Engineering Centre, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia. His research focuses on Planning, Design and Engineering of Sustainable Systems and Processes.

Table of Contents

Preface to the 2nd edition v

Preface vii

1 Process Integration and Intensification: An Introduction 1

1.1 Process Intensification 1

1.2 Process Systems Engineering and Process Integration 3

1.3 Contributions to Pis and PI to energy and water saving 4

1.4 What is Process Integration? 4

1.5 A short history of the development of Process Integration 5

1.6 The aim and scope of this textbook 8

2 Setting energy targets and Heat Integration 13

2.1 Introduction 13

2.1.1 Initial development of Heat Integration 14

2.1.2 Pinch Technology and targeting Heat Recovery: The thermodynamic roots 14

2.1.3 Supertargeting: Full-fledged HEN targeting 15

2.1.4 Modifying the Pinch Idea for HEN Retrofit 16

2.1.5 Benefits of Process Integration 16

2.2 Pinch Analysis for maximizing energy efficiency 17

2.2.1 Introduction to Heat Exchange and Heat Recovery 17

2.2.2 Basic principles 19

2.2.3 Basic Pinch Technology 28

2.3 Summary 65

3 Synthesis of Heat Exchanger Networks 71

3.1 Introduction 71

3.2 HEN synthesis 71

3.2.1 The Pinch Design Method 72

3.2.2 Methods using mathematical programming 93

3.3 Grassroots and retrofits; impact of economic criteria 97

3.3.1 Network optimization 97

3.3.2 The Network Pinch 98

3.4 Summary 100

4 Total Site Integration 103

4.1 Introduction 103

4.2 What is a Total Site and what are the benefits? 104

4.2.1 Total Site definition 105

4.2.2 Total Site Analysis interfaces 106

4.3 HI extension for Total Sites: Data extraction for Total Sites 107

4.3.1 The algorithm 107

4.3.1 Step-by-step guide 107

4.3.3 Working session 113

4.4 Total Site Profiles and Total Site Composite Curves 116

4.5 Site Utility Grand Composite Curve (SUGCC) 123

4.6 Modeling of Utility Systems 124

4.6.1 A flexible steam turbine model for cogeneration evaluation 124

4.6.2 Utility network modelling: Simulation and optimization 130

4.6.3 Utility system: An illustrative example 132

4.7 Targeting of Combined Heat and Power generation (CHP, Cogeneration) during process design 135

4.7.1 Targeting CHP using the SUGCC 135

4.7.2 Choice of optimal steam pressure levels 137

4.8 Advanced Total Site developments 139

4.8.1 Introduction of process-specific minimum allowed temperature differences 139

4.8.2 Retrofit of industrial energy systems at the site level 140

4.8.3 Numerical tools for Total Site Heat Integration 141

4.8.4 Power Integration 147

4.8.5 Targeting for Low CO2 Emissions with CO2 Emission Pinch Analysis 159

4.9 Summary 166

5 An Integrated Pinch Analysis Framework for Low CO2 Industrial Site Planning 171

5.1 Introduction 171

5.2 Framework for Low CO2 Emissions Industrial Site Planning 171

5.3 Case Study 174

5.3.1 Stage 1: Baseline study 175

5.3.2 Stage 2: Targeting for Total Site Heat Recovery with cogeneration using TSHI (Tool 1) 177

5.3.3 Stage 3: Targeting for hybrid power system integrating RE resources with PoPA (Tool 2) 179

5.3.4 Stage 4: Targeting for low CO2 emission with CEPA (Tool 3) 181

5.3.5 Summarized network diagram 186

5.4 Conclusion 186

6 Introduction to Water Pinch Analysis 191

6.1 Water management and minimization 191

6.2 History and definition of Water Pinch Analysis 192

6.3 Applications of Water Pinch Analysis 193

6.4 Water Pinch Analysis steps 194

6.5 Analysis of water networks and data extraction 195

6.5.1 Analysis of water networks 195

6.5.2 Data extraction 197

6.5.3 Example 198

7 Setting the maximum water recovery targets 205

7.1 Introduction 205

7.2 Maximum water recovery target for single pure freshwater 209

7.2.1 Water Cascade Analysis technique 209

7.2.2 Source/Sink Composite Curves (SSCC) 212

7.2.3 Significance of the Pinch region 213

7.3 Maximum water recovery target for a single impure freshwater source 214

7.3.1 Pinched problems 214

7.3.2 Threshold problems 221

7.4 Maximum water recovery targets for multiple freshwater sources 221

7.5 Working session 225

7.6 Solution 225

8 Water network design/retrofit 231

8.1 Introduction 231

8.2 Source/Sink Mapping Diagram (SSMD) 231

8.3 Source and Sink Allocation Curves (SSAC) 233

8.3.1 Example of network design using SSCC for utility purity superior to all other streams 236

8.3.2 Freshwater purity not superior to all other streams 240

8.3.3 Simplification of a water network or constructing other network possibilities 244

8.4 Working session 247

8.5 Solution 247

8.6 Optimal Water© software 249

9 Design of Cost-Effective Minimum Water Network (CEMWN) 253

9.1 Introduction 253

9.2 Water Management Hierarchy 253

9.3 Cost-Effective Minimum Water Network (CEMWN) 255

9.4 Industrial case study - a semiconductor plant 265

9.4.1 Using CEMWN targets as reference benchmarks 279

10 Conclusions and sources of further information 287

10.1 HEN targeting, synthesis, and retrofit 287

10.2 Total Site Integration 288

10.3 Total Site methodology addressing variable energy supply and demand 289

10.4 Utility system optimization accounting for cogeneration 290

10.5 Maximum water recovery targeting and design 291

10.5.1 Recommended books for further reading 291

10.5.2 State of-the-art review 293

10.6 Analysing the designs of isolated energy systems 294

10.7 PI contribution to supply chain development 295

10.8 Hydrogen networks design and management 295

10.9 Oxygen Pinch Analysis 296

10.10 Pressure drop considerations and heat transfer enhancement in Process Integration 297

10.11 Power (Electricity) and Hybrid Pinch 299

10.12 Computational and modeling tools suitable for applying PI 300

10.12.1 Heat and power PI applications 300

10.12.2 Water Pinch software 301

10.13 Challenges and recent developments in Pinch-based PI 302

10.14 PRES Conferences on Process Integration, Modelling and Optimisation for Energy Saving and Pollution Reduction 303

Index 309

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