The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2009

The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2009

Paperback(First Edition)

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Overview

Elizabeth Kolbert, one of today's leading environmental journalists, edits this year's volume of the finest science and nature writing. Bringing together promising new voices and prize-winning favorites, this collection is "a delight for any fan of popular science" (Publishers Weekly).

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780547002590
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date: 10/08/2009
Series: Best American Science and Nature Writing Series , #2009
Edition description: First Edition
Pages: 354
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.90(d)

About the Author

Elizabeth Kolbert was a political reporter for the New York Times for fourteen years before joining the New Yorker in 1999. Her series on global warming, "The Climate of Man," was awarded the American Association for the Advancement of Science's magazine writing award. Her stories have also appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Vogue, and Mother Jones. She is the author of Field Notes from a Catastrophe. Tim Folger is a contributing editor at Discover and writes about science for several magazines.

TIM FOLGER is a contributing editor at Discover and writes about science for several magazines. He lives in New Mexico.

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From the Publisher

"[Elizabeth] Kolbert has pulled together a magnificent display of writing. There;s not a weak piece in the bunch...the collection is a joy to read and one to savor." - Publishers Weekly

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The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2009 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
bezoar44 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Perhaps this is just a matter of personal taste, but I found this 2009 entry in the Best American Science and Nature Writing series less compelling than average. One advantage of the essay as a form is that it doesn't require that a piece of writing have a narrative arc, that is, tell a story that moves from one point to another. An essay can also circle around a subject, exploring it from different angles. But many of the pieces in this collection didn't manage either to take me on a journey or provide multiple views of a single topic. Several felt more like feature articles in a daily newspaper; interesting snapshots, but nothing memorable. The best essays included: Atul Gawande, 'the Itch', on the mechanism and possible cures for persistent itching; Sue Halpern, 'Virtual Iraq', on the use of virtual reality to treat veterans with PTSD; Michelle Nijhuis, 'To Take Wildness in Hand', on the challenge that global climate change poses for how we think about ecosystem and species conservation; Benjamin Phelan, 'How We Evolve', on the measurement of ongoing human evolution; David Quammen, 'Contagious Cancer', on the unusual problem of cancerous tumors that spread like infectious parasites; and Patrick Symmes, 'Red is the New Green', which paints a bleak picture of Cuba's environmental treasures as the Castro regime nears its end.
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