The Cleansing

The Cleansing

by Bill Rogers

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Overview

Christmas approaches. A killer dressed as a clown haunts the streets of Manchester. This is his reckoning. DCI Tom Caton and forensic profiler Kate Webb must follow the trail from the site of the old mass cholera graves, through the penthouse opulence of canalside apartments, to the Victorian Gothic grandeur of the Town Hall. Time is running out for Tom, Kate, and the City.

The first in the acclaimed British Crime Fiction Series - the DCI Tom Caton Manchester Murder Mysteries. Winner of the 2011ePublishing Consortium Writers Award 2011, shortlisted for the Amazon Breakthrough Debut Novel Award, and the LongBarn Books Debut Novel Award.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781909856158
Publisher: Caton Books Ltd.
Publication date: 07/16/2014
Pages: 364
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.75(d)

About the Author

Bill Rogers is the British Crime Fiction author of the bestselling DCI Caton Manchester Murder Mysteries. His first novel "The Cleansing" received the ePublishing Consortium Writers Award 2011, and was shortlisted for the Amazon Breakthrough Debut Novel Award, and the LongBarn Books Debut Novel Award. In addition to the nine bestselling crime novels he has written "Breakfast at Katsouris" an anthology of short stories, "The Cave" a novel for teens, young adults and adults, and "Caton's Manchester" - a unique guide to the City of Manchester, England, through a series of walks incorporating crimes scenes in his novels.
A former Principal Inspector of Schools for the City of Manchester, Bill lives in and works in the North West of England.

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The Cleansing 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Eyejaybee on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
An interesting novel, and notably adept for a debut. The characterisation was a little on the wooden side, and Rogers' attempts to give his protagonist depth by referring to his book clubs, musical tastes and visits to the gym perversely served more to heighten his two dimensional aspects. He was more successful with the hints about Caton's personal tragedy in the past, with fleeting references to the loss of his parents, that did serve to render some depth to him.The procedural aspects of the police operation were covered well and the plot, though strianing credibility in places, showed good planning. Not the most dynamic or gripping novel I have read this year, but I was sufficiently impressed to look for his other books,