The Giving Tree with CD

The Giving Tree with CD

by Shel Silverstein

Hardcover(50th Anniversary Edition)

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Overview

The Giving Tree turns fifty! To celebrate the anniversary of this classic favorite by Shel Silverstein, this edition features a beautiful metallic green jacket, a commemorative gold sticker, and a CD recording of Silverstein reading The Giving Tree.

Since it was first published fifty years ago, Shel Silverstein's poignant picture book for readers of all ages has offered a touching interpretation of the gift of giving and a serene acceptance of another's capacity to love in return.

Shel Silverstein's incomparable career as a bestselling children's book author and illustrator began with Lafcadio, the Lion Who Shot Back. He is also the creator of picture books including A Giraffe and a Half, Who Wants a Cheap Rhinoceros?, The Missing Piece, The Missing Piece Meets the Big O, and the perennial favorite The Giving Tree, and of classic poetry collections such as Where the Sidewalk Ends, A Light in the Attic, Falling Up, Every Thing On It, Don't Bump the Glump!, and Runny Babbit.

And don't miss Runny Babbit Returns, the new book from Shel Silverstein!

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780060586751
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 02/18/2014
Edition description: 50th Anniversary Edition
Pages: 64
Sales rank: 77,994
Product dimensions: 6.10(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.00(d)
Lexile: 530L (what's this?)
Age Range: 4 - 8 Years

About the Author

Shel Silverstein 's incomparable career as a bestselling children's book author and illustrator began with Lafcadio, the Lion Who Shot Back. He is also the creator of picture books including A Giraffe and a Half, Who Wants a Cheap Rhinoceros?, The Missing Piece, The Missing Piece Meets the Big O, and the perennial favorite The Giving Tree, as well as classic poetry collections such as Where the Sidewalk Ends, A Light in the Attic, Every Thing On It, Don't Bump the Glump!, and Runny Babbit.


Shel Silverstein 's incomparable career as a bestselling children's book author and illustrator began with Lafcadio, the Lion Who Shot Back. He is also the creator of picture books including A Giraffe and a Half, Who Wants a Cheap Rhinoceros?, The Missing Piece, The Missing Piece Meets the Big O, and the perennial favorite The Giving Tree, as well as classic poetry collections such as Where the Sidewalk Ends, A Light in the Attic, Every Thing On It, Don't Bump the Glump!, and Runny Babbit.

Date of Birth:

September 25, 1930

Date of Death:

May 10, 1999

Place of Birth:

Chicago, Illinois

Place of Death:

Key West, Florida

Education:

Chicago School of Fine Arts; University of Illinois (no degree)

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The Giving Tree with CD 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 50 reviews.
SavanahDayhoff on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Shel Silverstein¿s book The Giving Tree is a wonderful story about friendship and sacrifice. The book¿s characters are a tree and a boy. The book takes the reader through the life of the boy and the tree and describes their friendship. The boy uses the tree¿s leaves to play. He climbs her trunk and swings from her branches. He eats her apples and sleeps in her shade. He becomes a teenager and does not return to the tree. He returns as a young man in need of money, and the tree gives him her apples to sell. He returns as middle-aged man in need of a house, and the tree gives him her branches to build a house. He returns as a old man in need of a boat to go away, and the tree gives him her trunk to make a boat. He returns at the end of his life in need of a place to sit and rest, and the tree gives him her trunk to rest upon. This book makes me think about a child and its provider. Having a child often means giving everything because one wants to make that child happy. I like the lessons that can come from this book about giving and friendship and even greed. The pages are plain, white with black ink, but I think that is all that is necessary. The true purpose of this book is to reach the readers with the message.
scd87 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Yes, yes, the tree may be a little pathetic, and it should stand up for itself. But, all in all, the message of being kind and helping others (even if it may not be easy for you) is something people need to learn. Most people are too self-centred, so I don't worry too much about anyone taking it the wrong way and being as extreme as the tree! But, since there always is that possiblity, I will give the book 3 stars.
elle0467 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a great book about the real meaning of giving and receiving of a boy and an apple tree. The tree eventually becomes a stump that the old man now realizes that he's ruined. A story of love that will compell readers to go to the next page.
bfadkins on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a story about the gift of giving and the capacity of love. This story is told through the life of a boy. The tree gives the boy all her bounty throughout all his years. This book is great for all ages.
lbush005 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Shel Silverstein is a genius. Sad story, great morals. Human kind can be so selfish, and kids (at any age really) should learn to respect the earth as well as others. Everyone has feelings-- and apprently, so do trees.
PKKingster on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The Giving Tree is a book that tells the tale of a boy growing up with a tree, and the ways in which the tree sacrifices himself for the boy's happiness. It provides very little in the form of text, but so much in the form of emotion and displays of loyalty. Going back through this picture book as a high school student, though, could be quite beneficial. Alongside the themes of emotional tugging at work, students can also begin to pick up a type of critique against the way in which we tend to abuse our natural resources, among other things. I think going back and looking at "children's" literature in a high school setting can be beneficial in looking to see what else is there beyond the surface, and The Giving Tree is the best example out there.
C.Martinez on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The giving tree is a wonderful book about how love never dies. Love will live on even though it can be forgotten. It is a good parallel to Gods love and showing how God loves us and will never leave us. God gives us everything he has he gave us the world.
lmaddux on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Teaches children to be giving. And also for them to appreciate the things that people give them. Not to take them for granted.
carriedold on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A classic, a good lesson on sharing and love.
ktextor on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a story of a boy and his tree that is constantly giving to th little boy. In the beginning a place to play, to an apple and shade. As he gets older though he begins using the tree for things that he needs but the tree never turns him down and is always willing to give. It tells the story of the tree never complaining and always being happy when that boy came to see it. Beautiful story.
aflanig1 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A great story that teaches about selfishness, giving, love and friendship
JoseDelAguila on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A classic book for all ages¿for mothers and fathers! A moving parable about the gift of giving and the capacity to love, told throughout the life of a boy who grows to manhood and a tree that selflessly gives him her bounty through the years. All ages
LainaBourgeois on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The tree always provides the boy with what he wants: branches on which to swing, shade in which to sit and apples to eat. As the boy grows older, he requires more and more of the tree. The tree loves the boy very much and gives him anything he asks for. In an ultimate act of self-sacrifice, the tree lets the boy cut it down so the boy can build a boat in which he can sail. The boy leaves the tree, now a stump. Many years later, the boy, now an old man, returns, and the tree sadly says: "I'm sorry, boy... but I have nothing left to give you." But the boy replies: "I do not need much now, just a quiet place to sit and rest." The tree then says, "Well, an old tree stump is a good place for sitting and resting. Come, boy, sit down and rest." The boy obliges and the tree was very happy.
joyceclark on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
My six year old son's reaction to this book: "What the heck?!? I liked this book up until the end, but now I don't get it." I agree. Giving is one thing; martyrdom is quite another.
vossc2009 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a book I loved when I was growing up. It has great lessons in it and I think it is awesome for any age!
nkertz on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
this book is about a tree that loves a boy and gives him everything she can. this is a book for all ages because anyone can relate to it. this book can be used in a lesson about the environment and how people take from it and never give back. iit can also be used for a lesson about love and friendship and sacrificing thing for the ones you love. this book is very touching and after first reading it it brought tears to my eyes because it is full of emotion and voice.
sarahbatte on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
About a boy who finds a tree when he is very young. He makes friends with the tree and continues to take from the tree throughout his life. The tree gives and gives to the boy untill he dies and the tree has nothing left to give. I can see why some people see subliminal messages inside this book.
hmr83 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The Giving TreeShel SilversteinThis fiction picture book may lack an impressive word count, but makes up for it with a moral lesson for readers of all ages. Immediately, the reader is introduced to a talking apple tree. Silverstein writes of a young boy and his lifelong relationship with this tree. The tree lets the boy climb in her branches, eat of and eat of her apples, but as the boy grows older, that is not enough. The boy constantly takes from the tree, and eventually the little boy, now a grown man, wants to build a boat to escape his horrible life. So the tree tells the boy to cut her down and sail away. Eventually the boy comes back to the tree, but she has nothing left to give but a stump, perfect for resting upon, and that's just what the boy needs. Although I have heard many odd interpretations of this story, I like the first one I hear in high school best. My high school librarian told me that this book was about the sacrifices parents make for their children. I think the author raises an issue central to our generation. We are selfish, self-centered, egotistical, and ethnocentric kids who take take take, but never give. I know there are countless short stories, novels, and other forms of literature that express the dangers of living a selfish life, but I have never read a book that made my heart twinge with such simplicity. I think that it is very important to teach The Giving Tree to young adult readers because they are so selfish. Although it may not stink with a lot of students, hopefully it will make the students ask themselves how they treat their own parents. It's a valuable lesson that I learned later than I should have. I would recommend this book to anyone, any age, in any situation. The central ideas of love and sacrifice are things that we encounter everyday, and we need to appreciate them.
Khoffy on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I read this book to my classroom and had a fantastic discussion about the moral message of The Giving Tree and the implications about our world and our interactions with the environment. My students really connected with the actions of the little boy and the consequences that they had for the tree.
fatlamb on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Interested to read this book due to a class discussion we had. Two clear and distinct compelling sides from colleagues. First point of view, a beautiful yet gut wrenching story of a tree who does everything "she" can for a little boy, from apples to eat then sell, to branches to swing on and play to cutting down all the branches to use for a house, etc... The story is takes you on a journey from childhood to old age. Second point of view, the selfish child takes and takes everything that he wants from the tree, to the point where co-dependance and abusive comes to mind. The giving nature of the tree (female) and the destruction of the boy (male). This book falls under the category you either love it or hate it.I enjoyed reading this powerful and moving story, the illustrations black and white so simple with ink drawings it does not take anything from the story, the illustrations and the story work well together, not over powering each other, I think the simplicity of the drawings makes the story stronger. Controversy surrounds this book and I wonder if it is due to making one think, I sure took a look at myself after reading this book. I do believe this book has the appeal to children but is written for adults. I can see why this book is loathed and loved by so many, for me the story is so good it hurts. Age kindergarten and up.
SarahChaisson on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A young boy plays by this tree. Over time the tree and the boy both fall in love with one another. They are best friends. As the boy gets older he comes to visit the tree less and less. The boy, who is now a teenager, finally comes to visit and tells the tree he doesn't want to play but he tells the tree all the things he needs. The tree gives the boy all his apples, leaves, and eventually even his trunk. The boy, now an old man, now comes to the tree everyday and sits with his friend on his trunk.
AllisonHood on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Wow!! This was an incredible story. It teaches the importance of relationships that are built over lifetimes. This book enables readers to develop narrative. I often ask my children to describe to me the story after I read it. A special book to share and read aloud to your child.
jshillingford on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Well done morality tale about taking things for granted, and the need to appreciate nature. Wonderful. Simply wonderful.
TeachersHelper More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful book for any age. It was drawn to my attention by a fourth grader who asked me if I have read this book yet. I hadn't do I purchased it. I am very happy that I had. Great, Great story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Have always loved this book. Great value with lots to consider!