The Golden Rules Of Human Resource Management

The Golden Rules Of Human Resource Management

by Ali Asadi Mba Ma (It)

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Overview

This authoritative volume on human resource management is highly recommended reading for business owners, HR professionals, and others who are responsible for the human resource function within their organizations. Written by an acknowledged expert in all areas of business management, The Golden Rules of Human Resource Management is a well-organized guide to understanding this vitally important area of your business. Covering such topics as hiring, orientation, mentoring, performance, and so much more, the author has given us a much-needed reference that you will turn to again and again.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781468585247
Publisher: AuthorHouse
Publication date: 04/30/2012
Pages: 140
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.33(d)

Read an Excerpt

THE GOLDEN RULES OF HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

WHAT EVERY MANAGER OUGHT TO KNOW ...
By ALI ASADI

AuthorHouse

Copyright © 2012 Ali Asadi, MBA, MA (IT)
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-1-4685-8524-7


Chapter One

Section 1

Hiring

1. Why Is Hiring So Important?

Hiring employees is easy! Correcting mistakes is what takes time. Any business that is not solely managed by family will need to hire employees. The decision will impact your business—one way or the other.

If you are a large business, one hiring error may not matter too much, unless it is the CEO! However, for entrepreneurs and SMEs, each worker represents a major fraction of the workforce. In a small organization, each employee represents a major fraction of the human resource. This means that while hiring correctly is important for all organizations, it becomes critical for small ones.

Most business leaders—at least the ones who are progressive—recognize that it's employees who make the company. No matter how good you are, unless you are running a mom-and-pop store, your employees will face customers.

Employees will generate invoices. Employees will handle complaints, and employees will produce goods.

Entrepreneurs who ignore employees and the critical importance of getting the right employees will soon be without both the employees and their business!

Take your time to hire. It is better to go with a vacant chair for a few days than it is to fill it with the wrong person.

Hiring a new employee takes preparation. Other employees also watch. Therefore, it is extremely important that you have an established system in place for bringing in a new worker.

The Golden Rules

• The wrong employee costs you time, money, and future business.

• Do not initiate the hiring process without preparation.

• Get as many great employees as you can hire.

• Even if you are running a small store, put a hiring process into place.

• A wrong hire is disruptive to your business. It could cost 3 to 15 times the worker's salary to get a replacement. Choose with care.

• Employees meet more of your customers than you do. Your customers' impression of your business depends on your employees.

• A bad employee can affect many others. Hire with care.

• Your best practices will remain theories unless great employees put them into practice.

• By having a well-defined hiring process, you will find it easier to track the progress of recruitment throughout its various stages.

• Nothing you do will be more important than getting the right people into the right jobs.

• The more carefully you plan the hiring process, the fewer problems you will encounter during and after the hiring.

Remember, wrong employee selection will:

* Make you lose customers

* Add stress to the environment

* Waste your training and mentoring

* Miss opportunities

* Possibly add to your legal and financial burdens

2. Timing Your Hiring Actions

On some occasions, it is very clear that you need to hire a new worker. The vacancy exists due to promotion or maybe someone has left or has been fired. On all of these occasions, you should be in a position to anticipate the vacancy and take actions to start the hiring process in time.

A process that starts under control will go better. If you can anticipate and plan your hiring actions,you will generally get a better candidate than if you run out in the street when the chair falls vacant. Remember—and we will emphasize this time and again—a planned and controlled process will get you better results every time.

If you are creating a new position, timing can be more difficult. Slowly, over the course of day-to-day business, you realize that you are understaffed in a specific area. Do remember that employees have to generate much more than their salary in output just to cover the wages you give them. Be sure you have the work available for them to contribute enough.

Do the math. Apart from the salary and bonuses and any other perks, do you have the space, furniture, and workstation that will be essential for your new employee? Consider the training required to bring the employee up to speed. If the training program is run on predetermined dates, it makes no sense to make new hires report much ahead of that date unless you can put them to work before the training session.

Many times seasonal issues also dominate your hiring decisions. Stores take on extra help before the holiday season starts, and so do many businesses. Financial consultants need more accountants just before the close of the year. These needs can be planned for—and therefore done better. Select your hires well before the season starts, and you will get the best ones.

The Golden Rules

• Make sure you start the hiring process in time.

• Ensure you have the resources-more so if you are creating a new job. There are many hidden and visible expenses before an employee becomes productive.

• Be aware of your seasonal needs.

• Dovetail your new employee's arrival with the start of scheduled training programs.

3. Determine Your Needs

Determine what jobs you need done and what skills are needed.

The first step in the hiring process is to determine your needs. Write out the qualifications (duties/responsibilities, skills/expertise needed, experience and education/training required or desired) for the position you are trying to fill. Pay some attention to the type of personality of the individual you are looking to hire. For example, you need a different personality for a researcher as compared with a salesperson. Prioritize the needs and the qualifications you seek, and this will help you create a good job description.

Identify the responsibilities in each area where the need exists and the skill that is required to fulfill this gap. Look at education, knowledge, and skills, (such as bookkeeping, computer usage capability—what hardware/software?), communicating (writing, speaking, making presentations), leading/supervising.

For each area of responsibility, determine the personal characteristics required for each job (such as attention to detail, organized, personable, persuasive, insightful, able to work independently).

You should consider the result that you expect from that job and then go backward to find out the qualifications needed for it. Sometimes, you need to have two people for the job.

Consider that the job must be doable. Do not be a perfectionist and expect too much from a single person. If you find the work description is getting too complex, consider creating two jobs.

Keep in mind that knowledge and the ability to do the job are not the same things.

The Golden Rules

• Tabulate and prioritize your requirements.

• Identify responsibilities and the skills required.

• If needed, break up complex jobs into two.

4. Sample Job Rating Form

Once you have defined the requirements of the job, prioritize your hiring criteria and make a rating form based on the requirements you have tabulated. The values will form a typical 5-point Likert Scale, with 1 representing "weak" and 5 representing "strong." You can give ratings the following objective values:

1—Low requirement, an unimportant criterion

2—Below-average requirement, not critical

3—Acceptable, required criterion

4—Above-average, important requirement

5—Essential requirement

How can you ever place any requirement in the low-requirement category? Here's an example: if you are recruiting security guards, physical attributes are important, but educational requirements are relatively unimportant. However, if you are recruiting knowledge workers, then the opposite will apply.

The Golden Rules

• Defining the requirements of the job well will allow you to frame a comprehensive job-rating form.

• Since the requirements are different for different jobs, the job-rating form will change as well.

5. Defining the Job

This is another step that helps you think more about your needs and the job you are seeking to fill. Once a need for a new employee has been established, you start the process of the actual hiring. If you are a large, well-established organization, your task is in some ways easier, while in others it may well be more complex.

It is easier in large organizations because there are well-defined qualifications, duties, responsibilities, and salary bands in place. It may be more difficult because the procedures may be lengthier. Autonomy to one HR manager may be subject to validations and approvals.

As mentioned earlier, your staffing decision can be more critical to your company if you are small. Therefore, preparation and careful selection are important. However, remember that a small firm needs greater flexibility than a larger organization. Be sure that you leave flexibility in your job definition.

Create a detailed job description—If the position has become vacant due to a promotion, you should ask the person promoted to write a detailed job description for you. Sometimes, you will be surprised at the level of detail you will get—something an HR manager may never otherwise know. People who are being promoted will naturally do their best for your company. In fact, every time you promote employees, you should ask them to detail their previous job requirements explicitly.

Do not restrict yourself to the previous employee alone; ask the boss to give you a job description as well.

In the case where you are creating a new job, you have more work writing a good job description. Write what you can decide on, discuss it with other managers in similar businesses, and discuss it with the person the new hire will be working with. Another good place to look for job specifications can be the classified ads for similar positions placed by other companies in the same business.

Once your job description is clear, work out the salary package and the other tangible/intangible benefits you will be offering the individual. A number of websites allow you to research salary packages. If your employees can research salaries, so can you! Knowing what others pay could be helpful too.

Appendix A gives you a sample job description and the work you need to do before placing an ad. Take a look.

The Golden Rules

• A well-defined job will get you better-qualified candidates.

• Ensure you leave scope for additional duties in the job description.

• Ask the previous incumbent (where possible) to give you a job description. Ask the boss as well.

• Check out what the industry does as well.

• Research the salary and fix the salary band and benefits you will offer.

6. Writing Job Ads

A well-written job ad has other advantages besides attracting the applicants you want. By being specific, it gets you responses from those who meet your basic criteria—thereby saving you time reading piles of CVs or interviewing candidates who do not meet your requirements. A good ad also works as a banner for your company even though some people who read it may not be interested in applying.

We know that good employees are critical to a company. Therefore, the success of a job ad can be best ascertained by the quality of the candidates it is likely to bring in. For example, if you are looking for top-quality researchers, your ad will emphasize the field of research, facilities, intellectual freedom, previous patents, and support staff. If this is done well and the ad is displayed in the right media, you can be sure to get good responses.

The media you use—print or online—will depend on the job you are offering. For most jobs, the norm now is to use both media. This way you reach both the Internet users and people who do not use the Internet. An online ad can be more detailed and have links to a greater amount of information, whereas a print ad is often smaller and more direct due to the higher costs involved. For print ads, be sure to give offline methods of applying (fax and surface mail) besides giving an email address and a website.

Even when you are writing for the Internet, do not make your ad overly detailed and long. It will turn off many prospects. Use bulleted text, white space, and indenting to make your text easier to read. Give a great title that attracts attention (both print and online).

You can combine several vacancies in one ad, but be sure that they are targeting similar groups. If you need administrative and accounting staff they can fit together, this ad cannot contain a posting for a CFO or an IT head because they may not be looking at the media where your ad is published.

The Golden Rules

• Write a conversational advertisement—do not make the advertisement too complex or stiff.

• Use the direct pronoun "you." You are selling your company to the would-be hire. Employ sales language to attract the best possible talent. This is particularly important if you are looking for special and hard-to-find talent. As an example, we could say "On this job, you will have complete freedom to research and publish." Contrast this with "Candidate will be allowed to research and publish."

• Keep the ad precise, without any fluff-stay to the point and crisp.

• Double-check for errors.

• Avoid giving a sales pitch; do not make inflated claims about a great work environment and benefits.

• Describe benefits and career-advancement opportunities.

• Offer multiple contact methods.

• Combine vacancies but sensibly; you cannot expect facility management people and database administrators to scan the same advertisement spaces.

7. Posting a Job

A key decision to be made early in the hiring process is whether you are going to post a job to the external world or first declare the vacancy internally.

There are pros and cons to each option, and in some cases one or the other approach may be nearly mandatory. There are cases where the morale of your existing employees makes it necessary that you give them an opportunity to be promoted first. Only when a suitable internal candidate is not found should you go for an external hire. Following this policy allows you to retain experience not to mention avoiding trouble with unions.

Especially in a large organization, it makes more sense to promote an employee than to hire a newcomer. You know the person; the employee knows the company and its culture and in all probability knows part of the job anyway. Getting the employee to be productive in the new position will be far faster than starting someone from ground zero. There will be cases where it is absolutely necessary to bring in fresh blood. Your organization may be small with insufficient numbers of employees to really promote anyone. The job description may be something totally new, or you may want to break away from the traditional way of doing things. Steve Jobs did that when he brought in John Sculley from Pepsi to run Apple.

If you decide on an internal selection first, the office email and bulletin board are obvious choices to let employees know. Word of mouth also works in small organizations. However, make the requirements of the job and the qualifications and experience required very clear. Give adequate time for people to update their resumes and apply.

If you decide to look outside for your new employee, your methods will depend on the job you are advertising.

Since you are looking for the best-possible person to fill a vacancy, pay some attention to the way you publicize it. For someone to fill a technology position, online job portals and social networking sites will provide good results. For really senior-level positions, a headhunter or a consultant may give far better results. Quite often, your own employees may refer a good prospect.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from THE GOLDEN RULES OF HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT by ALI ASADI Copyright © 2012 by Ali Asadi, MBA, MA (IT). Excerpted by permission of AuthorHouse. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Contents

Preface....................xiii
Section 1 Hiring....................1
1. Why Is Hiring So Important?....................1
2. Timing Your Hiring Actions....................3
3. Determine Your Needs....................4
4. Sample Job Rating Form....................5
5. Defining the Job....................6
6. Writing Job Ads....................8
7. Posting a Job....................10
8. Creating Structured Application Forms....................12
9. Shortlisting Candidates....................14
10. Interviewing Candidates....................16
11. Conducting Tests....................20
12. Reference Checks....................21
13. Making a Decision....................23
14. Making a Job Offer....................24
Section 2 Orientation and Onboarding....................26
15. Orientation Essentials....................27
16. Training....................29
17. Setting up a Mentoring Program....................31
Section 3 Performance Management....................32
18. The Criticality of Performance Management....................33
19. Communication....................34
20. Ensure Receipt of Communication....................34
21. Coaching Your Employees....................36
22. Monitoring Performance....................37
23. Measuring Performance....................38
24. Performance Evaluation....................40
25. Handling Poor Performance....................43
26. Communication and Feedback....................43
27. Following Up on Performance....................46
28. Handling Complacency....................47
29. Managing Change....................48
30. Pay and Performance....................49
31. Delegation....................51
32. Discipline and Termination....................52
33. The Exit Procedure....................55
Section 4 Retaining Good Employees and Maintaining Relations....................57
34. Good Workplace Communication....................57
35. Managing Employees....................59
36. Employee Motivation....................62
37. Benefits and Perks....................63
Section 5 Information Technology & Human Resource Management....................66
38. Information Technology in the Workplace....................66
39. IT in HR Administration....................68
40. Major Software in Use....................69
41. Attendance and Time Policy....................71
42. Need for IT/Internet Policy....................72
43. Monitoring Devices in the Workplace....................74
Section 6 HR & Labor Laws....................76
44. Labor Laws in the USA....................76
Appendix A Sample Job Description....................83
Appendix B Sample Job Application Form....................87
Appendix C Sample Evaluation Sheet....................92
Appendix D Record of Reference Checks....................94
Appendix E Sample Job Offer letter....................96
Appendix F Thank You letter to All Unsuccessful Applicants....................98
Appendix G Sample Employee Evaluation Form....................100
Appendix H Sample of Employee Performance Improvement Plan....................109
Appendix I Sample of Warning Letter to Employee....................111
Appendix J Sample of Overtime Form....................113
Appendix K Sample of Internet Usage Policy....................114
References & Bibliography....................117
Index....................119

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