The Murder of King Tut: The Plot to Kill the Child King - A Nonfiction Thriller

The Murder of King Tut: The Plot to Kill the Child King - A Nonfiction Thriller

by James Patterson, Martin Dugard

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Overview

Since 1922, when Howard Carter discovered Tut's 3,000-year-old tomb, most Egyptologists have presumed that the young king died of disease, or perhaps an accident, such as a chariot fall.

But what if his fate was actually much more sinister?

Now, in THE MURDER OF TUT, James Patterson and Martin Dugard chronicle their epic quest to find out what happened to the boy-king. They comb through the evidence—X-rays, Carter's files, forensic clues—and scavenge for overlooked data to piece together the details of his life and death. The result is a true crime tale of intrigue, betrayal, and usurpation that presents a compelling case that King Tut's death was anything but natural.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780316034043
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
Publication date: 09/28/2009
Pages: 352
Product dimensions: 5.60(w) x 8.30(h) x 1.20(d)

About the Author

James Patterson has had more New York Times bestsellers than any other writer, ever, according to Guinness World Records. Since his first novel won the Edgar Award in 1977 James Patterson's books have sold more than 300 million copies. He is the author of the Alex Cross novels, the most popular detective series of the past twenty-five years, including Kiss the Girls and Along Came a Spider. He writes full-time and lives in Florida with his family.

Hometown:

Palm Beach, Florida

Date of Birth:

March 22, 1947

Place of Birth:

Newburgh, New York

Education:

B.A., Manhattan College, 1969; M.A., Vanderbilt University, 1971

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The Murder of King Tut: The Plot to Kill the Child King - A Nonfiction Thriller 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 258 reviews.
kanellio65 More than 1 year ago
With the hugely successful and amazing non-fiction book, AGAINST MEDICAL ADVICE in 2008,Patterson showed another side to his mystery writing. Patterson co-authors with Martin Dugard and they present their theory of how Tut, so often known as "the boy king", died and why. James Patterson writes in the prologue how important research is in ANY kind of book that is written. Martin Dugard makes the trips to London, to Egypt, and to Tut's tomb, while Patterson concentrates more on the books and online references and data in order to get the historical background correct. The book is cleverly and yet cohesively divided into three time periods and goes back and forth between the three, and even includes maps to help visualize locations. Present day is one of the time periods and is where Patterson explains how he got the idea to do this book. Their details enabled me to get a mental image of the pyramids, the time periods, and most of all, brought about in me a sympathy for young King Tut. In the end, Patterson does give his idea of what actually happened to the young king. The second time period is from 1891 to 1939 and takes place initially in London and moves on to Egypt. This part is the amazing story of Howard Carter and how he started out as a sketch artist in London getting paid to sketch people's pets and was then hired to be a sketch artist on an expedition to Egypt. Howard Carter is one of the most famous Egyptologists of the 20th century and the way he started out, with a fascination for Egypt and his drawing skills to become who he was, is so interesting and reads like a really good novel. He spent years excavating tombs in the Valley of the Kings in Egypt until he "struck gold" in November of 1922.It was then that Carter found King Tutankhamen's burial site. The third and oldest time period of the book is 1492 BC to 1319 BC where we meet young Tutankhamen. This part amazed me as it described how the city of Armana had been built by Pharaoh Akhenaten and Queen Nefertiti. Their relationship was detailed down to how the Pharaoh was dying from sand that was eating away the enamel in his teeth allowing disease and decay to poison his body. I had never heard of such a thing but it certainly makes sense. This oldest part also told how and why Tut married his half sister as well as told how and why the tomb was so hard to find. There seemed to be some reason for people to want to totally erase everything there was about King Tut. He was just beginning to acquire the skill he needed to lead when he died, very mysteriously during the night. After Nefertiti (who was Tut's stepmother) and Tut died, Armana was destroyed by one of the people involved in Tut's murder, if you are to believe the conspiracy, and that seemed such a waste. The way that Patterson weaves these three parts together was very well done and I found myself thinking I really was just reading a really good mystery. The research that Dugard did is a huge part of what makes this a successful story. Even if you aren't an expert about this subject, and I am not, you have to have that research to make it feasible. AND, if you don't have a master storyteller like Patterson to add his research and then his writing skills to put the pieces together fluently and fabulously, then you wouldn't have THE MURDER OF KING TUT-and a really, very good book. I found this to be a great end of the summer read!(Review by Karen Haney, edited to meet size requirements)
grumpydan More than 1 year ago
James Patterson and Martin Dugard's non-fiction thriller "The Murder of King Tut" reads like a Patterson novel but filled with facts. The authors have the theory that Tut was murdered and develop that idea with thorough research. The book has you going through three time period. The period of Tut, which was quite fascinating to read; the tale of Howard Carter, the archeologist obsessed with finding the tomb in the early part of last century and present day (Patterson's life being consumed by the mystery of Tut). In Patterson's usual style, the chapters are short, making it an easy read. He presents his theory, but I am not sure he convinced me. It was a thrilling read and I enjoyed it much better than some of his other recent works.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
James Patterson tried to draw readers into the story with an introduction that detailed his fascination with the death of King Tut. That's truly where the drama ended. By the conclusion of the book, I was asking why it had been written. Patterson talks about all of the projects he has going on at any given time. I think he should focus on a few good books rather than hordes of mediocre ones.
LitLoverKP More than 1 year ago
Did Patterson actually do ANY research for this book? His theories are preposterous and with no citations as to where his theories come from how is any intelligent human being supposed to follow through on the research and see where the ideas came from originally (preferably from an expert in the field)? It received one star only because it wouldn't let me post without one. UGH!
Silvia More than 1 year ago
Another great book by bestselling author James Patterson. I truly enjoyed reading this book and could not put it down. This is a great nonfiction Thriller and brings to life the history of Eqypt. I still wonder if the Child King Tut got really killed or if he died of the accident. This will still be out for debate. I would recommend this book to anyone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read some reviews and honestly you guys do not undrstand the world of forensics. No one knows what happened, aside from king tuts head wounds. But thats what makes this book incredible, James took little information and made a very plausible explanation of the occurance. Of course you would not realize that if you have no perception of how scientists do it. Thats all explanations on the matter will be, theories. Therefore get over yourselves and stop being negative towards a book you have no comprehension of and stop reviewing poorly.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think I will like this book because I love history,espcially about Egyt and stuff about the Civil War.
Nicole Cater More than 1 year ago
This was a good entertaining look at the possible murder of Kin Tut. I enjoy ancient history and this was not at all dry as so many books can be. I'm not sure if I believe Patterson's theory, but it is a interesting one and he did do his research. I especially liked his account of Tut's life in story form, it made the book zip by. It's worth a read if you are a nut for history, and enjoyable whether you think he 'solved the case' or not.
KennyS More than 1 year ago
Maybe because of who the author is created a higher expectation for me, but I was left a little wanting. I wished more coul've been given to Tut's death and the conspiracy around it. I enjoyed Carter's part of the story but wished there was more about the murder, since it IS in the title.
roseofscotland More than 1 year ago
No one really knows for sure what went on during the end of the Amarna Period. Mummies are missing. We do have King Tutankhamun's mummy and the treasures of his burial chambers, but these things can add more questions than answers. What happened to the mummies of Nefertiti and her daughters? Was Aye a friend to the royals or an enemy? There are differing opinions yet Patterson states his conclusions as if he is a final authority and no one need study these things any longer. He is a mystery writer not an Egyptologist who has spent years studying the subject! If you are an Egyptophile of this period then you know that Patterson's research was sloppy and his conclusions were made before he had all the facts. Other things which bothered me about this book was the use of Tutankhamun's name as Tut. I do not believe the people of this ancient land used nicknames, especially the royals! His attitude relates a certain disrespect. Also, he makes the change in Tutankhamun's name when the Amarna religion dies but fails to give Tutankhamun's wife the same consideration. Her name became Ankhesenamun and did not remain Ankhesenpaaten. He is cavalier in his conclusions. Who wanted the Pharaoh dead? Aye ... possibly; Horemheb ... possibly; Ankhesenamun ... get a life. The king was the love of her life! I believe (and these are my personal beliefs from personal research) that Aye was true to the royal family, that Horemheb was an enemy of Akhenaten because he tied the Army's hands and lost Egypt's territories by not defending the borders. I believe he followed Tutankhamun because he was the rightful heir and willing to take Egypt back to the power is was before the new religion. (Note the chariots, bows and arrows and throwing sticks buried with the young king!) I believe that Egypt was left with no king apparent when Tutankhamun died, that Ankhesenamun was afraid of remarrying anyone "old" (which is why she sent the letter) and that she did end up marrying Aye before Tutankhamun was buried so that there was a ruling king who was Egyptian and could perform the necessary religious ceremonies to send Tutankhamun on his way. I believe that Horemheb did kill the Hittite prince because as a true Egyptian he would not have an enemy sit on the throne. I also believe there are still missing tombs protecting their royal mummies and many secrets. It will take more time to uncover the complete history. I believe that the young king had an accident with his chariot and this eventually took his life through septicemia. It makes sense. What 19 year old does not believe in his invincibility and takes chances with his life? We see this behavior in our own culture! Until the 20th century we did not have a concept of how infection occurred or how antibiotics worked or that these medications were even available. I also believe that we still do not have all the answers ... but we keep looking for answers and give opinions not conclusions. Even when I started getting uncomfortable with this book I continued to read it through so that I understood Patterson's thinking process. I think he just needed a little spending money and used this book to get him through until his next mystery was published!
JGolomb More than 1 year ago
The premise of "The Murder of King Tut" is very alluring, particularly with the power of two strong names in writing: James Patterson who's written many popular books and Martin Dugard who's written a couple of wonderful epic biographies. The delivery on this promise, however, was a terrible disappointment. I give this 2 stars instead of 1 only because I was able to finish it; mostly due to its 250 pages which are broken up by a very consumable 99 chapterettes. Yes...99 chapters in 250 pages. Mr. Patterson and Mr. Dugard didn't have much to say. The book bounces back and forth between the early 20th century focusing on Howard Carter and his early career and eventual discovery of the tomb of Tutankhamen - and the early 1300s B.C. focusing on the Boy King's birth and demise. The flashbacks to King Tut's era are filled with trite dialogue that I can only guess were drawn 100% from Patterson's imagination. Having read two other Dugard books, I would expect his involvement dealt exclusively with the non-fiction research. Much of Carter's chapterettes were taken from various diaries of his. Without any notes or bibliography, however, it was impossible to tell what was made up and what had at least some foundation in fact. These chapters were, though, interesting. Patterson would have us believe that King Tut was murdered, a common analysis that's not at all unique (just search for books on King Tut). Within the last couple of years, scientists have performed and analyzed a CT scan on Tut's body and concluded that he probably died from an infection caused by a broken leg. While I understand that this recent analysis is open to interpretation, Patterson dismissed it out of hand. I would've liked a little deeper rationale here. Patterson resolves this ancient whodunnit with the most simplistic of conclusions based on a painting within the room that contained the body of the Boy King. After reading about 220 pages and 90+ chapters, I'd come to realize that the masterstroke conclusion of who killed Tut would be as disappointing as the rest of the book. On that, Patterson delivered.
Eyeballs More than 1 year ago
My first Nook book and it was a dud. I was looking for more forensic research but got a pinch of research, a lot of fiction, and a mildly interesting read. I did learn that I like using the Nook. If a reader didn't know a lot about Tut or Howard Carter it could be an interesting primer. If you want more then there must be better resources. There was a TV special that was light years ahead of this, though it drew similar conclusions. How could you not love a who dun it book on Ancient Egypt- now I know, read this one.
Gatsby1970 More than 1 year ago
I was very disappointed in this book. It did not add anything new nor did it reflect any research. Rather than waste ink and paper on writing about himself and his projects, Patterson should have positioned this as what it is: historical fiction with some bits of reality mixed in. Why exactly does he disagree with the findings of an accidental death? Easy to read but that is about it.
lunar33 More than 1 year ago
Instead of being published in book form, this could have been published in Readers Digest...in 2 monthly installments. Nothing new in this book about Tut or Carter. Just the same old story re-hashed to sound like a murder mystery. I'm sorry I purchased it and wasted my money. The author said, this book was the most research he has ever done for a book, he really should stick to fiction that requires no research at all because I feel there was no research done for this book. Just a plot line, some fabricated dialogue between characters and a shiny cover on the book. Save your money or get it at the library
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a great storyline ... I couldn’t put it down! I don’t often re-read books, but this one could be an exception!
Kanellio on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Did you know that James Patterson also writes non-fiction? For many people who never knew that fact, this was an awakening! THE MURDER OF KING TUT is touted as a "non-fiction thriller" and it is every bit of that. With the hugely successful and amazing non-fiction book, AGAINST MEDICAL ADVICE: ONE FAMILY'S STRUGGLE WITH AN AGONIZING MEDICAL MYSTERY in 2008, Patterson showed another side to his mystery writing. In that, he researched and told the story of a medical mystery finally solved when the parents of a child eventually receive the correct diagnosis that their son has Tourette's Syndrome and Obsessive Compulsive disorder. With this child's mystery told, Patterson now has moved on to another child's mystery, the death of young King Tutankhamen. Patterson co-authors with Martin Dugard and they present their theory of how Tut, so often known as "the boy king", died and why.James Patterson writes in the prologue how important research is in ANY kind of book that is written. Martin Dugard makes the trips to London, to Egypt, and to Tut's tomb, while Patterson concentrates more on the books and online references and data in order to get the historical background correct. As he says even in fiction, if the research is correct, the story will be believable and move quickly to a satisfying ending. This book does just that as it moves along quickly and reads like a novel.The book is cleverly and yet cohesively divided into three time periods and goes back and forth between the three, and even includes maps to help visualize locations. It sounds like it might be hard to follow but it wasn't because the characters and settings are so well drawn out that you get these visuals in your mind and can be right where they are as you go from one time period to another.Present day is one of the time periods and is where Patterson explains how he got the idea to do this book. He tells how it became almost all consuming as he learned more and more with the research he and Dugard came up with. The facts they present were interesting to me and not confusing but rather explained so much of what little I already knew about this subject as well as fit in with the other two parts. Their details enabled me to get a mental image of the pyramids, the time periods, and most of all, brought about in me a sympathy for young King Tut. In the end, Patterson does give his idea of what actually happened to the young king but of course you don't think I am going to tell you that, now do you?The second time period is from 1891 to 1939 and takes place initially in London and moves on to Egypt. This part is the amazing story of Howard Carter and how he started out as a sketch artist in London getting paid to sketch people's pets and was then hired to be a sketch artist on an expedition to Egypt. He was needed to sketch the writings and drawings on the walls as once the pyramids were discovered and opened, the air caused them to start to fade and so he was needed to preserve what was there in his drawings. This is what started Carter's lifelong quest to find the tomb of King Tut. Howard Carter is one of the most famous Egyptologists of the 20th century and the way he started out, with a fascination for Egypt and his drawing skills to become who he was, is so interesting and reads like a really good novel. He spent years excavating tombs in the Valley of the Kings in Egypt until he "struck gold" in November of 1922. It was then that Carter found King Tutankhamen's burial site, with everything inside preserved and the mummy of King Tut inside. This part alone was a fascinating read but then there is the third part of this book.The third and oldest time period of the book is 1492 BC to 1319 BC (and I had to stop and remember the smaller the number became, the further along we were in BC) where we meet young Tutankhamen. The description of how the tombs were built was interesting to the point that they were so secretive, the slaves who built them were killed upon compl
readafew on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book from cover to cover. I didn't really know what to expect when I started this one; a book of facts laid out for a lawyer?, a chronicle of the life and times of a boy Pharaoh as we know them?, a historical fiction novel based on what little is known of Tut? It ended up not being any of these things. The story is a 3 pronged attack at the Tut mystery. The first part deals with a tale of the Pharaoh's of ancient Egypt, starting with Tut's grandfather, shortly before he died, and moving along through several Pharaoh's resting the longest, of course, on Tut. The next thread woven through the story is Howard Carter's life and his search and eventual discovery of King Tut's tomb. The last and by far the smallest thread of the book is James Patterson's little story on how he started writing this book and a couple glimpses in his quest to figure out who, if anyone murdered the boy King.The story of Tutankhamun is the driving force of this book and in my opinion it is complete narrative and fully from the imagination of James Patterson, though he used as many known facts about the time and people as were available to give it life. The story was very well put together and I enjoyed looking into the possible Egyptian past. The story of Howard Carter was much closer to a biography and I also enjoyed it quite a bit for very different reasons, mostly it was filling in a lot of holes in my knowledge about Egyptian Archeology during the first quarter of the 20th Century. It also was great to learn more about the actual discovery of Tut's tomb.The parts with James Patterson giving highlights of his participation in the book are very few which is good. The couple actual chapters dealing with this don't really add much to the work other than giving the whole thing a nice sense of balance. At the beginning he claims he'll prove murder and at the end he claims he knows who did it. He gives a big reveal but the text nor any given facts, really support his conclusions. Overall I found this to be a great book worth a read, especially if you have any interest in Egyptology or the Pharaohs in general. Patterson's conclusions don't detract from the book at all.
historybuff1 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The Murder of King Tut is an excellent non-fiction account of the life and tragedy that befell the Egyptian king. Patterson masterfully recounts the story of the murder of King Tut in such a way that it will keep you mesmorized until the end. It is a must read for history lovers.
ilovetoeat on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is my first James Patterson book I ever read. I wasn't really used to his style of writing. I am very interested in King Tut so I finished this book in one setting. I was very confused, because the author jumps from the past, to the late 1800s, to present time. I felt that there could be more to the book and it seems unfinished
masterdeski on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is the first book I've read by James Patterson, and I was unprepared for the choppiness of his chapters. By reading the chapter headings (dates) closely, which I had to remind myself to do, I was able to keep from getting lost in the 'time travel.' Writing style aside, I was awed by the material and his treatment of the ancient Egypt storyline especially. The little bits of day-to-day life in Tut and Ankhe's story are enticing; I regret that Patterson didn't include a bibliography so I can see his source material for myself. As for Carter's storyline, I found it mildly interesting and mostly boring. The two storylines were interwoven very well, however, encouraging quick reading.
starkravingmad on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I purchased this book at a bookstore at JFK airport prior to a flight to LAX. Never having read Patterson, I was primarily interested in the historical nature of the book - a non-fiction thriller set in Egypt's New Kingdom. I was immediately immersed in the narrative and story. It was an extremely fast read - I finished it in a few hours.Patterson does a very good job of describing scenes and events from 100+ years ago to thousands of years ago. You feel as if you were there. However, in the rush to move through the plot, it does leave the reader yearning for a bit more historical fact. There are several sections where the book could have explored more including the very brief mention of the Hitite Prince, and the conquest of Canaan.This book is similar in it's plot as "Pompei" by Robert Harris, with the edge to the latter for introgue and level of detail, and the edge to "Tut" for creativity.Overall, an excellent read.
maunder on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I found this book to be very disappointing. A short book, it interjects the author's discussions with his editor, as well as the struggles of the discoverers of Tut's tomb, into a story of Tut's life and death. Tut's story is interesting, Carter and Lord Carnaervon's story (the tomb's discoverers) are somewhat interesting but Patterson's "struggles" to get this book printed smack of narcissism. I would go elsewhere to learn about King Tut.
suzanne5002 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book seems to have 3 parts to it. Patterson is telling us how he is acquiring all the facts. One is telling how life was during the reign of King Tut & his father & the other one is telling us about the people who involved in the digs to find the tomb. It is quite informative even though who really knows who killed King Tut? Merely speculation. It really is plausible as to who did it and why. It isn't one of your typical Patterson books but then I didn't think it was. But, it was a fast paced read as his other books are.
swanroad on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book replaces The Da Vinci Code in my mind as the worst book ever. Patterson asserts that King Tut was murdered and talks about a wound on the back of the mummy's head. Yet, in his imagined murder scenario, the boy king is strangled. huh? The author inserts himself into the book, with chapters about writing the book and how Tut's story fascinated him; I find this device to be extremely annoying and of no value to the story. The book is already quite disjointed when the chapters alternate between Patterson's fictionalized account of King Tut and the nonfiction account of Howard Carter's work in Egypt.
TomWheaton on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book as I have been to some of the locations in the story line. It was a quick read as most of James Patterson's books are. I read it in one day. I also like that the story was told from King Tut's view and also Howard Carter's.