The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Paperback(Unabridged)

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Overview


Great title poem plus "Kubla Khan," "Christabel," 20 other sonnets, lyrics, odes: "Frost at Midnight," "The Nightingale," "The Pains of Sleep," "To William Wordsworth," "Youth and Age," more. All reprinted from authoritative edition.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780486272665
Publisher: Dover Publications
Publication date: 09/18/1992
Series: Dover Thrift Editions Series
Edition description: Unabridged
Pages: 80
Sales rank: 127,897
Product dimensions: 5.19(w) x 8.25(h) x (d)
Age Range: 14 Years

About the Author

Samuel Taylor Coleridge was born in the English town of Ottery St Mary, where his father was a vicar, in 1772. The youngest of ten children, he attended school with Charles Lamb and spent two years at Jesus College, Cambridge where he was introduced to radical politics and theology by the poet Robert Southey. He first met William Wordsworth in 1795 and they published a joint poetry collection, Lyrical Ballads, in 1798; this highly praised volume, which started the English Romantic Movement, contained the first version of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. Alongside finding success with his poetry, Coleridge’s critical work, especially on Shakespeare, was highly influential. However much of his life was blighted by illness, opium addiction, financial problems and depression. He died of heart failure in London in 1834.

Table of Contents

To the Author of 'The Robbers' [sonnet; 1794?]
Sonnet: To a Friend Who Asked, How I Felt When the Nurse First Presented My Infant to Me [1796]
This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison [1797]
The Dungeon [1797]
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner [1797-98, revised later; marginal glosses added 1815-16]
On a Ruined House in a Romantic Country [No. III of 'Sonnets Attempted in the Manner of Contemporary Writers,' 1797]
Christabel [Part 1, 1797; Part II, 1800; 'The Conclusion to Part II,' 1801]
Frost at Midnight [1798]
France: An Ode [1798]
Lewti; or, The Circassian Love-Chaunt [1798]
Fears in Solitude [1798]
The Nightingale [1798]
Kubla Khan [1798]
The Ovidian Elegiac Metre [1799]
Something Childish, but Very Natural [1799]
Love [1799]
Dejection: An Ode [1802]
The Pains of Sleep [1803]
To William Wordsworth [1807]
The Knight's Tomb [1817?]
On Donne's Poetry [1818?]
Youth and Age [1823, with additions in 1832]
Cologne [1828]

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The Rime Of The Ancient Mariner 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 20 reviews.
drsdata More than 1 year ago
Though hard to follow at times it truly conveys messages of horror,doom sadness, shame and eventual deliverance and a new found respect of gods creatures.Man realizes his actions can influence many others fates.
Gilgamesh-JA More than 1 year ago
Coleridge is an early Romantic poet and The Rime of the Ancient Mariner is easily his most well known work. What makes this slender volume worth owning is the woodcut illustrations of Gustav Dore. They are beautiful works of art on their own and add to the understanding and appreciation of the poem.
Fred76 More than 1 year ago
Thought-provoking tale. Reminds me of the sea and some of the men I sailed with.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This has always been one of my all time favorites. I liked everything about this book. I would highly recommend it to anyone. Cheers
MrsLee on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a scrumptious taste and introduction to the poetry of Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Many of the thoughts and poems seem downright modern to me. I love much of his imagery; the issues and emotions evoked are very moving and worth pondering. I will definitely seek out more of his work to read.
jorgearanda on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Most of Coleridge's poems in this (very cheap) collection do little to me. Christabel and Kubla Khan in particular are florid but insipid. The narrative in the Rime of the Ancient Mariner (which is its call to fame) is somewhat engaging, but falls flat as many times as it rises.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A most excellent story combined with rhythm and rhyme
Wanderlust_Lost on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A classic collection. What better way to wind down a rainy afternoon than by escaping into the rich fantasy world of an opium addict?Coleridge really knew how to interest his readers interruptions from Porlock or no.
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dem2cs More than 1 year ago
I cannot believe some teachers still require reading this. I have alway thought of my time reading it was pure torture.