ISBN-10:
0520236947
ISBN-13:
9780520236943
Pub. Date:
07/01/2008
Publisher:
University of California Press
This Is Not a Pipe / Edition 2

This Is Not a Pipe / Edition 2

Paperback

Current price is , Original price is $24.95. You

Temporarily Out of Stock Online

Please check back later for updated availability.

Overview

What does it mean to write "This is not a pipe" across a bluntly literal painting of a pipe? René Magritte's famous canvas provides the starting point for a delightful homage by French philosopher and historian Michel Foucault. Much better known for his incisive and mordant explorations of power and social exclusion, Foucault here assumes a more playful stance. By exploring the nuances and ambiguities of Magritte's visual critique of language, he finds the painter less removed than previously thought from the pioneers of modern abstraction.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780520236943
Publisher: University of California Press
Publication date: 07/01/2008
Series: Quantum Books , #24
Edition description: Second Edition, 25th Anniversary Edition
Pages: 104
Sales rank: 232,730
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.26(d)

About the Author

One of the most important theorists of the twentieth century, Michel Foucault's (1926-1984) many influential books include Discipline and Punish, The Archeology of Knowledge, The History of Sexuality, and The Discourse on Language.

Table of Contents


List of Plates     vii
Acknowledgments     ix
Translator's Introduction     1
Two Pipes     15
The Unraveled Calligram     19
Klee, Kandinsky, Magritte     32
Burrowing Words     36
Seven Seals of Affirmation     43
Nonaffirmative Painting     53
Two Letters by Rene Magritte     55
Notes     59
Index     65
Plates     66

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

This Is Not a Pipe 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
NameD More than 1 year ago
more than just a playful essay, this title may be the most intriguing work on aesthetics ever written. what does it mean to represent and to affirm? in a painting of an original and a representation, why do we assume that the one we look at as the original is just that, wouldnt it be just as true for that one to be the representation? and much more, im not sure what else i can say to pay homage to an essay that is far greater than anything i will probably ever write, but it's really good, im a fan
Anonymous More than 1 year ago