Waiting to Exhale

Waiting to Exhale

by Terry McMillan

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback)

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Overview

The critically acclaimed novel about four women who learn how to carry on while leaning on each other from the #1 New York Times bestselling author of How Stella Got Her Groove Back and I Almost Forgot About You.

When the men in their lives prove less than reliable, Savannah, Bernadine, Gloria, and Robin find new strength through a rare and enlightening friendship as they struggle to regain stability and an identity they don’t have to share with anyone. Because for the first time in a long time, their dreams are finally off hold...

“Hilarious, irreverent...Reading Waiting to Exhale is like being in the company of a great friend...thought-provoking, thoroughly entertaining, and very, very comforting.”—Susan Isaacs, The New York Times Book Review

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780671851538
Publisher: Pocket Books
Publication date: 08/28/1996
Pages: 155
Product dimensions: 6.91(w) x 4.46(h) x 3.01(d)

About the Author

Terry McMillan is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Waiting to ExhaleHow Stella Got Her Groove Back, A Day Late and a Dollar Short, The Interruption of Everything, I Almost Forgot About You, and the editor of Breaking Ice: An Anthology of Contemporary African-American Fiction. Four of Ms. McMillan’s novels have been made into movies: Waiting to Exhale (Twentieth Century Fox, 1995); How Stella Got Her Groove Back (Twentieth Century Fox, 1998); Disappearing Acts (HBO Pictures, 1999); and A Day Late and a Dollar Short (Lifetime, 2014). She lives in California.

Hometown:

Danville, California

Date of Birth:

October 18, 1951

Place of Birth:

Port Huron, Michigan

Education:

B.S. in journalism, UC-Berkeley, 1979; M.F.A. in film, Columbia University, 1980

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Waiting to Exhale 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 47 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I remember being a kid and reading this book just because i saw the movie. But now that im older and have read it again i see it in a whole new light. Many of these stories are true and i have witnessed them. Just an amazing story to show how we as women take crap we shouldnt and how not ALL men are dogs and scum. Which is absolutely true. And we all need those special whom we can lean on and share the good as well as the bad with. Excellent story, i love terry mcmillan
mommypete More than 1 year ago
I just love this book. It waas just like the movie. I will read this book again one day.
peachesLM More than 1 year ago
I thought this was a very interesting book. The only thing I didn't care for was the way men got away with the things they did. I love the fact that these women were liberated and didn't take any mess from these guys. If I had to read it again I would, no questions asked. La Chandra Mathews
SeriousGrace on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is the ultimate chick lit story. Four women, all in their mid to late 30s, all searching for something have a friendship in Phoenix, Arizona. It's that friendship that gets them through all circumstances they deal with. Okay, I'm being coy. The circumstances mostly involve men. They all want a man to call their own. That's the one thing they all have in common (besides age and race). Sex and the relentless chase. They all want to be in a relationship solid enough to breathe easy in. Savannah is independent and a little jaded by men. She definitely reminded me of someone I know. Bernadine (Bernie) has been left by her husband for a younger woman, a white woman. Speaking of the movie, she has the scene we all can't forget: torching her husband's belongings in the back seat of his expensive vehicle, then selling everything else for a dollar at a tag sale. Robin's story is told from her perspective. She is a little naive when it comes to men. She believes in the power of astrological signs and smooth lines. Gloria is my favorite. Single handedly raising her teenager son, the father of her child has just told her he is gay.
RachelPenso on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This was the perfect book to read after the last one that was so depressing. A book about friendships between women and relationships with men. I always enjoy books that feature close friendships between women. They remind me to be eternally grateful that I can experience the same thing.
LisaMaria_C on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is the tale of four black women who are friends in early 1990s Phoenix, Arizona. I can't say I found any of the woman all that likable; they're so whiny and man-hungry. We first meet Savannah, never married and without children at thirty-six. She's affluent, doing well in her career in public relations, but tired of being single and of the faults of "buppie" (young black urban professional) males. She tells us, "I worry about if and when I'll ever find the right man, if I'll ever be able to exhale." Her friend from college Bernadine is being divorced by her husband who has insulted her by leaving her for a "white woman." Because, she imagines, he needs a white woman to treat him like a king. (Frankly, the racism of these characters was a major turn off for me.) Gloria, a working mother, is using food to fill up the emptiness inside, while Robin uses sex. I do like the sisterly solidarity between the four, but for me the plot is creaky, their voices too similar, this doesn't strike me as all that well-written and all the male bashing got old as the women move from one jerk to another.
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<3 <3 <3
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